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midlife crisis member
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Discussion Starter #1
I posted this in the "My Project Boat" thread but most people quit reading that thread a long time ago so here it is again.

My boat came with a new, never used genoa. It's not dacron except for a foot or so along the foot. It's a clear material with white mesh. I am sure it's an inexpensive sail.

My boat has a furler on it and the sail has a wire in the luff that I think the sail is supposed to furl on. There is no foil. Part of the sail will be exposed to the sun when furled sisnce it doesn't seem to have any protective material along the leech or foot.

So,
A) is the sail material any good?
B) should I furl it or remove it after each sail?
 

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With out having it in front of me, it looks like a mylar film jib with some sort of structural cloth in the middle. So in reality, it should be a better sail than a dacron. Yes, I would take it off while it is stored for a longer period of time.

Please note, I could be wrong on the material too.

marty
 

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midlife crisis member
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Discussion Starter #5
With out having it in front of me, it looks like a mylar film jib with some sort of structural cloth in the middle. So in reality, it should be a better sail than a dacron. Yes, I would take it off while it is stored for a longer period of time.

Please note, I could be wrong on the material too.

marty
The structural cloth is on one side of the film, not in the middle...In other words, one side is smooth, the other side mesh.
 

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Thanks Courtney.
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Looks like and open scrim mylar. I agree with G- the construction looks odd. Might be "home made" or from a "less well know loft". If it is any type of mylar you will either want to add UV protection or take the sail down when not in use. UV will degrade mylar very quickly. I have a mylar genny on my boat that is on a furler with UV protection and does nicely. Larger mylar sails almost do better on a furler so tey don't get creased in the process of hoisting and dousing each use.
 

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Headsail

Hi All Thumbs,

The sail you sent photos on is a small headsail. Because it is small it can be constructed the way it is, without many panels. The strength in the sail comes from the imbedded fibers in the cloth. The other material is there just to increase it's longevity and make it abrasion resistant. For the size headsail it is, I believe it probably cost less than $500 when it was new. The plastic will degrade if left uncovered in the sun. The wire luff replaces the function of the foil for the furling system to work. You should have a top and bottom swivel that attach to the head and tack of the sail. If this is the only headsail with your sloop, you have a couple of choices....put it up and take it down each time you use it, what I would do....or modify it to stay on the furler. You should add some lightweight sun cover to the foot and leech if you do that.

What I would do is use it as is a few times as is and determine if you like the way it operates and how the boat operates...then decide to modify it or not. Adding the sun protection might cost between $50 and $100 for that sail.

Hope this helps!

121Guy
 

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This is a pretty common cloth used in genoas trying to get by with a PHRF cruising sail credit or on dinghies where the loads are small. There do appear to be seams but they are widely spaced relative to the side of the sail.

The cloth itself is a laminated sail cloth consisting of mylar on both sides of a linear, non-woven polyester thread mesh. Used properly the mesh is typically oriented to take the primary load path the direction (luff and leech) and the mylar addesses loads on the bias. In this case there are no diagonal fibers which I would think is better suited for a radially cut sail. Bainbridge makes a fabric called 'DAX' which has diagonal fibers and which would be far better suited for this crosscut application.

Jeff
 

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midlife crisis member
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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
It has a few panels. Also several "pleats" to give it some shape. It's made by Sobstad Storer Sails. No way it's home made, it's got a Storer logo on it and it came in a Storer bag. Actually, I just found the company:Sobstad Sailmakers - Racing and Cruising Sails I had been googling Storer and wasn't having much luck. searched Sobstad and voila!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
The boat isn't really a dingy but it's not huge either. It's a 20 footer. The sail area for this jib is around 100 sq. feet.
 
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