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My experience is pretty limited but I haven't seen a roller furler set up below deck like this.
Am I seeing this right?
1995 Hunter Legend 35 5.png
 

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below deck furler, or under deck furlers. some boats have that setup. the idea is to get the foot of the sail as close to the deck as possible for better performance. the deck creates a fence fon the bottom of the sail so air does not spill onto the other side of the sail known as a deck sweeper. furler is in the anchor locker or a separate locker with a drain
 

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I've seen below deck anchor windlass too. Not sure I find either all that necessary, but it's done.
 

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It's not a modification it's from the factory, original equipment
Yes, I think Dufour does this, or maybe it's just the windlass. Dusty recollection from the last time I was actually able to visit a boat show.
 

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Lots of high-end yachts have clear decks. Winches under the deck too.
138483
 

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I've a feeling that artist has never even seen a sailboat. Even the cockpit seats are below decks, it seems.

Go to St Barts.


:)
 

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Hello,

Lots of boats come from the factory with below deck curlers. My 2002 c&c 110 came from the factory like that. Salona boats have below deck, and, as mentioned, some Dufour models as well. It is less common than above deck, but not what i would call rare.

The advantage is increased sail area. The disadvantage is more difficulty furling the sail. The furling line must make 2 90 degree turns before it is lead aft.

Personally i am a fan of below deck furlers.

Barry
 

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Also seen on a Jeanneau Sun Odyssey 45.1 - predecessor of my 45.2, same hull, a few differences - such as this.
 

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The only way a foresail is going to really take advantage of a sail's foot sweeping the deck is eliminating the lifelines too. It's a pet peeve of mine to see the foot wrapped over the lifeline, just like in Mark's photo above. Makes no sense to me and has to increase wear on the sail.
 

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Does attaching the tack closer to the deck really improve performance? I thought maybe adding a foresail pendant would increase performance due to more sail up high... as well as reducing chafe from the lifelines.

below deck furler, or under deck furlers. some boats have that setup. the idea is to get the foot of the sail as close to the deck as possible for better performance. the deck creates a fence fon the bottom of the sail so air does not spill onto the other side of the sail known as a deck sweeper. furler is in the anchor locker or a separate locker with a drain
 

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Deck sweeper headsails give a significant performance benefit, not just due to maximizing sail area. There is also the "end plate" effect, ensuring flow along the bottom of the sail stays attached to the sail rather than spilling off the foot. Sometimes you can see the spillage happening when the sail is eased out in the form of a patch of ripples on the water below the sail. The performance gain is likely much more than .1 knot!

There are certainly downsides to deck sweepers. They do tend to get fouled on the stancheons when grinding to close hauled. On race boats the bow or mast man has to "skirt" the sail on tacks. That problem can be reduced by installing rollers on the lifelines at each stanchion. This helps the sail flip over the stancheon instead of hooking on it.

The other downside is the reduction in visibility. On a headsail with an elevated foot and higher clew you have some visibility to leeward under the sail.

I am not sure how much benefit a recessed furler is on a cruising Hunter. Cruising headsails tend to have a higher clew so they furl cleaner, so you won't be getting the end plate benefit, but you still have the aforementioned downsides, plus a great gaping hole in your deck letting water into your anchor locker. The only benefit you get is slightly more sail area.

Sent from my SM-G981W using Tapatalk
 

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Deck sweeper headsails give a significant performance benefit, not just due to maximizing sail area. .....The performance gain is likely much more than .1 knot!

I agree.

As I am a light handed cruising boat doing long passages I have a high cut foot on my genoa so I can easily see under it. I would never have to go forward to see other boats. When I was on racing boats we always have crew on the bow at starts because you can't see a thing to leeward from the helm.

The performance difference between my high cut genoa and deck-sweeper must be substantial.

Mark
 
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I agree.

As I am a light handed cruising boat doing long passages I have a high cut foot on my genoa so I can easily see under it. I would never have to go forward to see other boats. When I was on racing boats we always have crew on the bow at starts because you can't see a thing to leeward from the helm.

The performance difference between my high cut genoa and deck-sweeper must be substantial.

Mark
Deck sweeper headsails give a significant performance benefit, not just due to maximizing sail area. There is also the "end plate" effect, ensuring flow along the bottom of the sail stays attached to the sail rather than spilling off the foot. Sometimes you can see the spillage happening when the sail is eased out in the form of a patch of ripples on the water below the sail. The performance gain is likely much more than .1 knot!

There are certainly downsides to deck sweepers. They do tend to get fouled on the stancheons when grinding to close hauled. On race boats the bow or mast man has to "skirt" the sail on tacks. That problem can be reduced by installing rollers on the lifelines at each stanchion. This helps the sail flip over the stancheon instead of hooking on it.

The other downside is the reduction in visibility. On a headsail with an elevated foot and higher clew you have some visibility to leeward under the sail.

I am not sure how much benefit a recessed furler is on a cruising Hunter. Cruising headsails tend to have a higher clew so they furl cleaner, so you won't be getting the end plate benefit, but you still have the aforementioned downsides, plus a great gaping hole in your deck letting water into your anchor locker. The only benefit you get is slightly more sail area.

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Thanks for the info, guys. I get it now why headsails attached to the deck surface can improve performance. Even with a jib pendant, I can't see very well. It might be worth getting some of those rollers to reduce wear on the headsail.
 
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