SailNet Community banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Reaction score
1,114
Unless you already have substantial amounts of sea time this is not going to be possible. At a minimum to operate in the US you would need a OUPV license, but this restricts you to no more than six pays passengers. For anything larger you need a tonnage license.

Tonnage licenses are broken down two ways, first by the size of the vessel (25, 50, 100) then by where (inland, coastal, near coastal). Each size/location license has its own requirements, but to operate in Hawaii you would at a minimum need a 25/Near Coastal license. The requirements for this license are as follows...

1) Must be able to document 720 days of experience on a vessel 360 of these days must have been on ocean or near coastal waters
2) Must have 90 days within the last 3 years
3) Your tonnage is determined by the U. S. Coast Guard depending on your experience for a 100 Gross Tons license, 180 days must be on vessels of 51 gross tons or above OR 180 days must be on vessels of 34 gross tons or above for a 50 gross tons license 180 days must be on a vessel of 26 gross tons or above. If all your time is on a vessel of 16 gross tons or less the license will be limited to 25 gross tons.
4) If you plan on operating an Inspected sailing vessel you must have a sailing endorsement, the required seatime for this is 360 days of sail or sail auxiliary time (these may be part of the 360 days and may be prior to license issuance.


The Yachtmaster license is a nice thing to have, and anyone working in the yacht market is wise to get both, since different ports have different requirements, and having both makes things easy. But for a US flagged ship in and out of a US state, a USCG license is a requirement.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Reaction score
1,114
The definition of a 'day' is a little odd. I have never seen and actual definition from the CG, just rumors of how it works. In my experience I have never seen a license denied for lack of days, but I have seen them whack off some. In my case they disallowed some day trips while allowing others, and counted some that were on boats under 16'. Luckily I had a few hundred extra days logged so it wasn't a big issue.

Frankly I am of the opinion that they just don't care all that much about these small licenses for recreational users. Unless you have experience working commercial ships no company will hire you to operate their vessels, so it's pretty clear from the application that you will be working small recreational vessels and I think just let it slide. So long as it seems like you are a reasonable operator.

This is doubly true for an OUPV. where the most common holder is running fishing charters in a small day boat. No real fear of a major environmental spill or loss of life while shoreline fishing.

The first license they seem to be serious about is the 200tonn. Since that is the first 'ocean' license, where you can go out of range of a helicopter.
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Reaction score
1,114
In Hawaii I would expect boats to be bigger, and by the time you get to a charter boat larger enough to crew charter instead of bareboat you are probably already talking about 6 passengers at a minimum. Someone brings a kid and all of a sudden you have to get a new captain onboard. Legally fine, but as a business practice a pain. So I would imagine that most of the charter companies are looking for someone with at least a 25tonn just to make their life easier.

The other issue of course is that charter companies know that someone with just an OUPV has pretty limited experience with bigger boats, and are likely to be gun shy about hiring someone to operate their boats with such a small license.

Certainly get the OUPV as soon as possible, and start logging time on larger boats (you would be amazed at how small a boat qualifies for the 100 ton).
 

· Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
Reaction score
1,114
So basically any time out in the ocean should count?
Pretty much.

And keep in mind that a when the USCG talks about tonnage it has to do with Gross Tonnage, which is a measurement of cargo capacity, not displacement. This leads Naval Architects to play all sorts of games to make sure a boat measures in at 99 tons, or 199 tons.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top