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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In 1-2 years I plan to sell everything I own and move to Hawaii. The ultimate goal is to work my way into being a captain of a charter boat, ideally catamaran, then save to buy my own boat to charter and see the world. While still here on the mainland I want to do everything I can to streamline this idea. I've been reading up, but I am a little confused. Most of the jobs over there require a Captains license. I've taken basic sailing lessons but otherwise have zero water experience, so the USCG experience requirements seem way far off. Should I go for a Yachtmaster license? What's the difference? I don't want to get over there and find out it's a joke......
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thank you very much, although a little disheartening, that was exactly the information that I was looking for. Guess I better get to work on logging some sea time. A long ways off but time is on my side. Cheers.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I've been doing some more reading up on the experience needed. As far as I can find, for a Master Near Coastal 100gt License (which is what appears to be what I will eventually need). I'll need to figure out how to log 360 days outside USCG borders and at least 180 on a boat over 50gt. Probably working as a deck hand, which hopefully I can do when I get to Hawaii. But, the requirements for the other 360 of the 720 days experience are pretty loose. (on a boat over 16ft and going back to the age of 14). Is there any reason that I can't log my family's 19ft ski boat to satisfy those days? I've probably taken it out over 500 times on over a dozen different bodies of water. Am I missing something?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thank you all for your input. I just got off the phone with a gentleman in Maui who posted an ad on craigslist looking for a captain. He said that if I can attain a 100 tonn Near Coastal license I would be hired in a day. So I suppose thats the route I'll take. Continuing sailing lessons here in Portland starting next week to log more days, gotta figure out how to get off-shore for a while. I'm assuming once I get over there I'll need to cut my teeth under someone and learn the waters anyway. If I can get on the right boat, I should be able to kill two birds.

My biggest obstacle, as far as I can see, is the stipulation that "The operator must have at least 360 days of on the water experience outside the boundary lines established by the US Coast". I cannot seem to find those boundry lines defined anywhere. Can anyone elaborate on that? A determined distance off-shore?
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
Hmmm.... I do only have partial vision in one eye. The other one is perfect. Guess I'll have to read up on the vision criteria. I pass the dol test, but they only require one eye.

No drugs, prescription or otherwise. Not worried about the physical part but it would sure suck to put in all the work and get denied because of my eye.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
"Vision must be at least 20/200, correctable to 20/40 in each eye. Color sense must be satisfactory (Waivers are available in some cases)"

That's what I found. Not sure if I can meet that criteria or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #25 ·
Found this too.

"Not meeting a vision, hearing, or general physical condition requirements does
not automatically disqualify the applicant."

I can see fine with both eyes open and my peripherals are good on both sides. More red tape to cut through.
 
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