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Discussion Starter #1
Hey everyone, I have come here not as a sailer but as a consultant working for a sailing center in New England. We are building a new sailing center in our community right along the waterfront. One of our biggest issues is what to use as fill for the boat yard. We don't want grass because that has to be mowed often and can grow up high under the boats. We also have had issues with gravel beating up the boats. So I was wondering if you could possibly recommend me materials you have seen used or use yourself that work well.

Basically what are the best materials for sailing boat yards?
 

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Whats wrong with concrete? Its a stable base, grass doesn't grow in it, pitched correctly its dry. I'd stay away from asphalt, its black so it absorbs solar radiation, gets hot and soft, then the boats topple over. I don't like sand or dirt, it blows around and gets on the fresh varnish.
 

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Whats wrong with concrete? Its a stable base, grass doesn't grow in it, pitched correctly its dry. I'd stay away from asphalt, its black so it absorbs solar radiation, gets hot and soft, then the boats topple over. I don't like sand or dirt, it blows around and gets on the fresh varnish.
The boat yard is about 30,000 square feet, and since we are right on the waterfront we want a surface that is as pervious as possible (lets as much water soak in as possible). The new pervious asphalt they have would be perfect except like you said it gets hot, soft, and hard at different times. We want as little storm water as possible to run differently into the lake, the more that enters the ground before the lake the better.
 

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The boat yard is about 30,000 square feet, and since we are right on the waterfront we want a surface that is as pervious as possible (lets as much water soak in as possible).
Wow. As a consultant to a boatyard, I would think you'd know a little more about what goes on in them. Do you have any idea what kind of chemicals and poisons are deposited onto the ground in a boatyard on a daily basis? You might want to look into your state's regulations about capturing and treating boatyard wastewater. :rolleyes:
 

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Just make concrete pads for the boats and keep the grass mowed around them. Grass looks good, absorbs water, and helps keep the radiant heat down in summer. Maybe give the live-aboards a spot for a garden.
 

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Some places (not boatyards, AFAIK) are now using lattice-pattern concrete pavers which let some grass grow - and water drain - through the holes, while presenting a solid enough surface for motor vehicles (or, presumably, boat trailers and cradles).
But I think you're going to have a hard time beating the cost of gravel.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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My Church is next to firm that has an interesting parking lot that drains. It is a green parking lot ? The Phone # is 859 447 94zero7 Pohl Rosa In Lexington, KY. I am not sure this would be a good thing for large amounts of weight. They did the lot behind their building and it has held up. Not sure what it is made out of ? It is light gray and at first looks like gravel but it is not. They have used snow plows on it. They park cars and have lines painted on it.
Pads and grass seem like the least expense.
I will find out more if you want but it seems like we should be getting the consulting bonus ? LoL
Kind Regards, Lou
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Wow. As a consultant to a boatyard, I would think you'd know a little more about what goes on in them. Do you have any idea what kind of chemicals and poisons are deposited onto the ground in a boatyard on a daily basis? You might want to look into your state's regulations about capturing and treating boatyard wastewater. :rolleyes:
I'm actually a student at a nearby university who was asked to take the current sailing center design and add more green building aspects to it. It's also a small sailing center boat yard that is only used to store the boats. Thank you to the person who mentioned concrete pads and grass, that's a viable option. Sorry I'm ignorant on boat yard practices, I am and environmental science student, not a sailor. Which is precisely why I came here for advice.

Can anyone tell me what is commonly used in boat yards?
 

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My Church is next to firm that has an interesting parking lot that drains. It is a green parking lot ? The Phone # is 859 447 94zero7 Pohl Rosa In Lexington, KY. I am not sure this would be a good thing for large amounts of weight. They did the lot behind their building and it has held up. Not sure what it is made out of ? It is light gray and at first looks like gravel but it is not. They have used snow plows on it. They park cars and have lines painted on it.
Pads and grass seem like the least expense.
I will find out more if you want but it seems like we should be getting the consulting bonus ? LoL
Kind Regards, Lou
This is actually incredibly helpful as it has reminded me of a parking lot I have seen in the past that sounds similar to what you are talking about. Also, I am not getting paid for this work, it's part of a class I have to take.
 

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It's also a small sailing center boat yard that is only used to store the boats. Sorry I'm ignorant on boat yard practices...
Then it is not a "boatyard." A boatyard is where boats are hauled out and set in cradles or stands to have maintenance and repairs performed upon them. You are talking about a dry storage facility.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Then it is not a "boatyard." A boatyard is where boats are hauled out and set in cradles or stands to have maintenance and repairs performed upon them. You are talking about a dry storage facility.
Boats are stored and repaired in this area
 

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Boats are stored and repaired in this area
Jeezus, this is like pulling teeth. :rolleyes:

OK, well many boatyards use concrete, some use gravel. But as this will be a new facility and as apparently work is going to be allowed to be done on the boats, you would do well to find out what the environmental regulations are regarding boatyards in your area (some of them may involve suitable yard surface materials.) But you cannot simply pave over a piece of land, commence boatyard operations and have every bit of anti fouling paint, oil, solvents, fuel etc. end up in the bay or river. There are federal and state laws governing this kind of thing. You may very well find yourself with some serious hurdles to jump.
 

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sunfish?junior?
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Everyone is new at and learning something new until they are dead. Some are zombies the walking dead. :laugher You will have a lot to discover and learn.
That place I mentioned has a web site.
You might want to start asking the City and State what options are legal. You may not be able to use all the space ? The nice thing is you have a clean slate ? No buildings or underground or overhead lines ? Will you have a road, rail, crane ? How big are the boats ? Will you stack them?
Kind Regards, Lou
 

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Farr 11.6 (Farr 38)
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If I had to design a paving material for a marina working area, I would use a based of a foot or two of a self compacting stone like #2 rock. I would then put down filter cloth to make future restoration easier. Then I would put down a foot or so of #2's. This would allow the water to filter through the stone, eliminate dust, and should compact to support the weight leg of a jackstand or wheels of a travelift.

For perhaps 20 feet along the water's edge I would replace the stone above the silt cloth with fill dirt and turf to filter any fine sediments.

While permiable concrete works reasonably well for a driveway or parking area, the dust of a boat yard would clog it quickly making it non-pourous rather quickly.

If you have non-work areas then permiable concrete might work.

Jeff
 
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What Jeff said is the way to go.
Pads will not work as different boats take up different size spaces. Boats are hauled at different times and they are crammed in pretty tight and will be packed differently every year.

The best you can do is make sure you have good drainage. Jeff's plan will compact down and be almost like concrete pretty quickly. Also you have the option to dig a hole to drop a rudder.

Jeff may weigh in but in some cases putting some drainage pipes in the mix to direct the water properly and some grading may be necessary.

Dress it up with some trees and grass around the trees and rail-road ties with some grass in between. Also if you are going to have boaters around don't forget the dog "park" and a place for some grass and grills. Keep these two areas on opposite sides of the space.
 

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Bill SV Rangatira
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The boat yard is about 30,000 square feet, and since we are right on the waterfront we want a surface that is as pervious as possible (lets as much water soak in as possible). The new pervious asphalt they have would be perfect except like you said it gets hot, soft, and hard at different times. We want as little storm water as possible to run differently into the lake, the more that enters the ground before the lake the better.
concrete footings for boat bays and permeable paving for the driving area
 

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Wow. As a consultant to a boatyard, I would think you'd know a little more about what goes on in them. Do you have any idea what kind of chemicals and poisons are deposited onto the ground in a boatyard on a daily basis? You might want to look into your state's regulations about capturing and treating boatyard wastewater. :rolleyes:
Fstbttms is correct. All run-off, whether it is poisonous or not, needs to be managed. Natural vegetation and landscape design can help in this endeavor. If your state regulations do not already specify what is required they will one day soon, so use a little foresight in your plans. You'll find examples from the Department of Natural Resources in Maryland, for example.
 

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Don't call me a "senior"!
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If the proposed facility allows hull work I would be a bit surprised if you can get permits for it with a permeable surface, particularly near the water. A few years of copper and lead leaching into the soil would make for "Superfund" designation in pretty short order.
 
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