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Discussion Starter #1
Hello everyone.

I have just joined the forum, and I'd like to start by saying I know very little about owning a sailboat, but I have the opportunity to obtain a 24 ft Hutton centreboard, however it does not have a trailer and I need to move it. I am looking at ebay and other sites but I need to know what size trailer is the minimum for me to move this boat? Ideally, I would like to buy a trailer that I can transport it to it's new home, while I do the refit, and then use for launching and recovering. So, as a minimum, I know I need a galvanized trailer, but should I aim for a single or dual axle, rollers or skid, etc etc. Any advice is appreciated.

Many thanks, Mark
 

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Welcome aboard!

It doesn't seem like you're asking about size, as much as features. If you're going to trailer your boat to/from every use, get the best trailer you can afford. Just be sure your tow vehicle can handle it. If you're only using it for storage and launch/hauling at the beginning and end of the season, you might get away with a cheaper trailer. Put the quality of the breaks on your list too.
 

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I think one of the 1st steps is fining out what the boat weighs.

I would think any number of trailers for popular boats like Catalina and Oday 22's and 25's could be made to work with some time and effort.
 

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OK, I'm new, so don't trust what I'm about to say. But, in the interest of getting the conversation going, the trailer will need supports on the sides to hold the boat up, and a support down the middle for the keel to rest on. The keel needs to be fully supported, at a minimum. Depending on the shape of the keel (I can't quickly find pics of one out of the water), you will likely need something even longer. I'd look to have support for as much of the boat's length as possible. But, as a starter measurement, measure from the bow to the end of the keel, or to a point about 3/4 of the boat's length. If there's an engine hanging off the back, I'd want a trailer that comes farther back so there is more support as you're moving the boat.

If you haven't seen it, I thought this might be of interest:

Brisbane Boat Sales - John Crawford Marine - Used Second Hand Boats

More fundamentally, though, do you NEED the trailer? If not, it may be easier to hire someone to move the boat for you. In the US, a used trailer for a 25' sailboat (I was looking for one for my Catalina 25) will cost AT LEAST $1200, and typically closer to $1800-$2000. I paid someone to move my Catalina about 60 miles and it was $500. I then avoided the headaches of finding a place to store the trailer when it wasn't in use.
 

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Freedom isn't free
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I'm not directly familiar with the boat, but just looked at some pictures... seems like a cruiser sized 24 footer... Nice layout actually.

My bet is the boat is over 3000lbs, so you're likely in the 2 axle category for the boat (to be safe).

Comparable trailers would be Catalina 25 trailers (which are common enough). Also the swing keel catalina trailer should work for the centerboard version of the boat you have. Not sure if the boat is a keel/centerboard, or what, but I suppose it sits higher on the trailer than it's flat bottom, so you'll need at least 18-24 inches that the bunks will sit higher than the keel/centerboard rest.

Other similar boats? Oday 23. Perhaps the Oday 25 (might be overkill though).

But look for tandem axle trailer, prefer extendable tongue, surge brakes, and adjustable bunks/stands. A decent area for a keel rest would be helpful too.

This is one from Triad, designed specifically for the Cat 25... you'll have to look to see what actual draft you have board up. Good luck as these trailers new are $3500 to $4500, and more depending on options.
 

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Boat trailers aren't designed to fit specific boats, They're designed to fit specific types of boats, e,g, deep draft vs. shoal draft sailboats. The crucial concern is that you find a trailer that is designed and built to carry a boat of your boat's type, and with it's displacement. If you find a trailer that will fit your type of boat and that will carry it's weight, then the trailer should have numerous adjustments that will adapt it to fit your specific boat. Begin by ascertaining the displacement of the boat. Then look for a trailer that is designed to carry that type of boat. Finally, check the trailer manufacturer's specifications plate to determine the trailer's load carrying capacity.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
Thanks everyone. On further research, the displacement of the trailer sailer variant is 2700lbs or 1225kg. The draft keel up is 12" or 30cm. I will need a trailer for moving the boat before and after each trip but the tow vehicle is not an issue.

Thanks again to everyone for their input. I'll be leaning towards a galv dual axle braked trailer with rollers as they look more adjustable.

For anyone's interest, there is a good Hutton website with reviews and some images at

Huttons Haven!

Thanks again everyone. This is a great forum, I'll be checking in regularly.
 

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In your neck of the woods, you may want to check around with a bunch of marinas to see if there are any trailers laying around. Maybe even a custom trailer.
 

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Mark,

Go to the marina and find one on a trailer. Bring your camera, tape measure and a sketch pad. I bought my 25' boat with no trailer, no truck, no sailing experience. Sounds moronic, I know, but it was all thought out. So, within 2 weeks I had to buy a dually trailer, retrofit it to accept a boat that was 90 miles away and deliver it to the marina so they could load it before snow fell. Snow, that's the frozen white stuff you see on TV. That was in late November, autumn to us. I had noticed an identical boat just 40 miles away, while I was looking at another. Off I went with the items I mentioned. That week, I found a powerboat trailer for $900 (US), raised the rollers on steel posts to the correct height and added brakes. December 8th we towed her home. That was a week before first snow.

Nice looking boat.

Don
 

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Discussion Starter #10
Thanks, I'll be going past a marina today hopefully to start snooping. Also, good pics. Especially the one with the snow. Even though I'm an aussie, I recognised it as I have seen a picture of snow before !!!!:)
 

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If you are going to trailer regularly long distance, you may want the trailer brake. However, if you are going to be using the trailer rarely and locally, you can get away without the brake in a boat of that weight. Most of the weight should be on the keel. It will help distribute weight if you use bunks rather than rollers.
 

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Discussion Starter #12
Success! I have purchased an old (2003) galv dual axle trailer which just needs a few slight repairs and the addition of brakes. Ebay purchase, very happy. Thanks for all of your input. Now I can go and get the boat.
 
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