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I like my keel deep and heavy for safety and upwind performance, encapsulated for easy maintenance (no bolts or leaks to worry about), and made of lead so they will not rust and be a total PITA to maintain.
 

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I prefer a well designed keel. A full keel can be designed to sail quickly and well, and a fin can be poorly designed and be a dog. So for me quality of design is paramount.
 

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Have moderate aspect fin ( by modern standards ) with bulb but encapsulated. Bottom half of cavity is pored lead. The bulb bolted on ( it's split in half. Then whole thing glassed over again.
Allows excellent avs. Very good pointing ability. Moderate draft of 6 1/2' no no keel bolts.
Have had full, modified full, very high aspect fin in past. Current design fits current use of half BWS and half coastal. If I was going more coastal would go keel/ centerboard. Agree some interesting spots in the nucks and crannies.
Find the asymmetric horizontal wing keels a fascinating idea. Bottom flat. Top curved. Just like a true wing. Deploy one on the leeward side and away you go. The stronger the wind the faster you go. The faster you go the more lift. Flat sailing not dependent on just keel weight but not foiling so usable in a seaway. Pull them in when downwind. No wetted surface so no parasitic drag from a keel.
 

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Boy, as noted at the top of page three by now not posting here Valenti, about post by t34c Robert Gainer. Jeff saying the same as I am feeling. An old timer, now gone with good info! Just as this person will be missed with his opins on different boat designs, things etc....

As far as which keel, will still to my lackadaisical way of saying on initial posts. Opinions are like a-holes, we all them, they all stink!

ALL keels, no matter the design, have plus and minus's. Choose your poison, do not look back!

marty
 

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On my current boat, I procrastinated for a long time whether to go for a single keel or twin keels. Going for for twin keels was one of the best decisions I made .In the last 32 Years ,I have never paid to tie to a dock, which has given me the freedom to cruise 11 months a year( which is what a cruising boat is for). I have only paid for two haulouts in that time ( only because I was in an area where the tide was too little ,and I had 4,000 miles of windward sailing ahead of me.)
I lose only about 5% performance over a single keel, and then only to windward. Rolling is greatly damped by twin keels.
In the 80's, 80% of the boats I did went for single keels. Now 80% want twin keels, and those who went single keel, wish they had gone for twin keels.
The advantage is mainly where there is lots of tidal range.
 

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I prefer the least amount(depth) of keel, that will give me good all around sailing performance, while allowing access to shoal areas for anchoring and exploring.

The centerboard boat I own is a good compromise. When we're out coastal sailing, the board goes up and down, a lot.
 

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We chose this boat specifically for this area. Lots of shallow, uncharted waters with coral heads etc. What we like about our keels are that they only draw a meter of water, which is pretty good for a 40 ft. boat, and they are just over an inch thick, and solid fiberglass. Guess I could say my favorite keels are ones with water under them.
 

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We draw 6.5ft, which is not a lot in the grand scheme of things. However, there are often anchorages or mooring fields, where the best tucked in spots are the exclusive domain of the stinkpots and cats. We just convince ourselves we're pretty cool, when we have to anchor out among the schooners or the big dogs from the New York Yacht Club. :)

We did anchor once, in the outer harbor of Edgartown, among the New York Yacht Club summer flotilla. Our puny little 54ft looked like a dinghy among the city of multi-deck yachts, lit up like a skyline. I wish I had a pic. Hilarious.
 

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Was in Sag Harbor last summer. With 6 1/2' feet anchored to the left of the marinas. We were the size of the dinghies.
 

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But I have this vision "What if you were anchored in Porto Fino on your 160' mega yacht. The crew was ashore and you were sitting on the stern, nice glass of Montrachet in your hand and,,,,you were depressed. What now?

Doesn't, have anything to do with draft but it came to mind reading about feeling your boat was small.

In my experience you can get by just fine almost anywhere with 6'3" draft.
 

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In my experience you can get by just fine almost anywhere with 6'3" draft.
Yes, but you are on the left coast. On the right coast, it helps to have less draft for some of our crowded anchorages. This poor fellow needed to draw less than 4' at the edge of the Cuttyhunk Town mooring field. Note the mooring ball off his stern. (BTW, he didn't need a tow, he waited for the tide and took a mooring in deeper water.)
 

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Bob you know the old joke about why you never ask your wife to measure anything. I was trying to be humorous. Oh well.....

I really appreciate what you said and I'm sure Carl does as well. It was nice so you need to be careful.
 
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