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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Here's a silly question.

I live in the city in a rental apartment and I don't own a car. I'm on the market for a 27-30ft sailboat and they're sometimes sold with a trailer. What do I do with it? Local marinas are happy to store it in their yard for a fee but only if it's registered and insured. They'll use it for winter storage but there is no cost advantage.

Is there any value in keeping a trailer around?
 

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One of None
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Not many 30 ft boats can be on a trailer.. at least not the type cars pull. From around 26ft up most are lifted in slings to and from the water. Or some yards use a hydraulic trailer. Boats need insurance!
 

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As Denise said, few 30ish footers will be on a trailer, so at this point I suspect you're worrying about nothing.

Should you actually find a boat with a trailer and don't want to store it, I'm sure it (the trailer) would be an easy sell, especially if it's a boat that is truly practically 'trailerable' - but again that isn't going to apply to a whole bunch of 30 footers...
 

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I had a Chrysler 26 that was on a trailer. It wasn't the kind of trailer that one backed into the water, but rather it still had to be launched with a crane in slings, etc. Kind of nice for those that have room to store the boat next to their house etc. in the winter.
 

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In most states trailer registration and insurance are very cheap. It is the storage that will cost you, but winter storage of boat on a trailer is still cheaper and safer then leaving it in water. Trailer is a good thing.
 

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It would make an easy cheap way to store the boat off season so I think keep it. It is a selling point when you decide to move up(and you will want to move up!). As Krisscross says there are different kinds of trailers, some for launching, some you can tow with it and lift the boat off with a crane, and others that are more of a "yard trailer" not meant for use on the street. Also if your apartment complex has a large parking lot, you may be able to put the boat in a back corner off season, and it would be handy to have it so close. If you don't have a car you can always rent a U-Haul and tow it to or from the marina with that at the beginning or end of season. Home Depot and Lowe's also rent trucks by the hour and are heavy duty so will tow a bigger boat than a normal car could anyway.
 

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There is always a demand for sailboat trailers, selling it would be no problem. To be very desirable it would need brakes. There should at least be a square plate just behind the wheel where brakes can be attached. Older trailers may not have the brakes or fittings, but are still good for yard trailers. Launching in slings from the trailer is no problem at most marinas, I do it just to keep my valuable trailer from rusting out so quickly.

To have your boat on a trailer nearby is so fantastic, you can work on it whenever you want, plus of course always keep an eye on it and check that all is well. Sometimes I take a sleeping bag and sleep on it for fun, make coffee in the morning. Or hang out for a bit and dream or think of possibilities - where could I add a wood stove??

I can see four of mine just looking out the kitchen window! :cool:
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all. I should have said New York City and I didn't mean trailer sailer. More stuff like J/30 and the alike or ULDBs. It's not very uncommon for them to have a trailer. It makes totally sense if you have a place to put it for cheap. The marinas here will store it on their yard for a fee ($350-$500 a season) but only as long as it's registered and insured. They'll happily use it for winter storage but will give no credit for it. Basically, keeping the trailer is at first glance just a cost factor with no immediate benefit... But maybe I'm missing something and hence my question.
 

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One of None
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The reason larger boats are not towed behind personal vehicles is beam (width) and horsepower to move 8-10,000 lbs of weight.
Towing a Big Boat on the Road? BoatUS Trailering Club Offers Discount Wide-Load Permit Service : BoatUS Press Room

J/30 certainly doesn't seem to be "trailer-able" What's a "ULDBs".?


Unless you are looking at Marine facilities that do not have yard storage you will never need or want a trailer. this is what/ how it's done at most marine yards. (sales promo, No involvement on my part)
 

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Lighter, of course, than non ULDBs but by that size the beam limitation is usually the bigger deal for routine towing - Ford, GM and Dodge etc will be pleased to sell you a tough enough vehicle!

I think having a suitable trailer for your boat would be a big advantage come storage, project, rehab times - yard daily fees add up pretty quick. But not having anywhere to store it between times would be problematic.
 
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