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Broad Reachin'
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I love learning about sailboat design, seeing how it gets implemented, and ultimately put to use by sailors through blog stories and posts on forums like SailNet.

Recently I asked Bob Perry to share his unique design perspective on sailboat rigs and what each variation means for putting pen to paper. Here's what came of it: Sailboat Rigs According to Perry

Hope you enjoy reading it as much as I did!
 

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I thought the term "Slutter" was kind of appropriate for such a half-assed combo. :D
 

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Hey, we have a Slutter! :)

I've not heard the term before and find it hilarious. I think I will find a few other reasons for it over time. Anyway, true to Bob's point, we have a removable inner forestay, intended solely for a storm or heavy weather sail. The tack is approx 4 feet behind the forestay and the hounds are pretty close to the top of the mast. It would never be used along with the genny. In fact, I've never used it at all.

If Bob is around, I would find it interesting to hear more about how you technically differentiate a cutter from a sloop with an added staysail. Is there a mast placement range? Does the foot of the main playa role? It would seem that the cut of the sails alone wouldn't be sufficient, but that may be it.
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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Not to intrude into Bob's area of expertise, but it is my understanding that in a boat designed as a cutter the mast will be set further aft so the proportions of the sails are different.
 

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Not to intrude into Bob's area of expertise, but it is my understanding that in a boat designed as a cutter the mast will be set further aft so the proportions of the sails are different.
this is also my knowledge...
but if i look at the images to that article, i doubt it - those masts seem to be set like on any other sloop...
it is different with these type of boats, i guess... ;)
 

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grumpy old man
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It's a grey area. Not sure there is any need to get technical with it. But if pressed I use station 4 as the mast location for a cutter. If the mast is forward of Sta 4 I call the boat a sloop. Interestingly almost all the early IOR boats with their big fore triangles had the mast at Sta 4. I called these boats sloops.

I think the terms are malleable and in most cases they work and we know what we mean.

In the example Vimes posted I'd call that a cutter. But, I am pretty certain that anybody connected with that project doesn't give a rat's patootey what I choose to call it.

" Bob who?"
 

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"or the worst one, “cutter rigged ketch”. We already have all the terms we need to describe rigs that have been around for 200 years."

Gee Bob, what have you got against Nauticat 33's and most of the other Nauticats ;) They have only been around for 40 years but that's what many of them are. Steve with "True Blue" who used to post here a lot before his wife drove him off to the 'Dark Side' had a good picture of his 33 as his avitar with all 4 sails flying. I have never rigged the inner forestay on mine but the deck and mast (as with most Nauticats) is ready for it.

Now I'm certainly not going to argue what is 'really' a cutter or not but I just couldn't resist a comment - that's all it is :)
 

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grumpy old man
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Stan:
I don't think it's important what you call your boat. Call it "Fred" if you like.
Why would you ever think I have anything against Nauticats? They are not my kind of boat but they have great appeal to many and they are very well done. I like them just fine.
 

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That was a great read . I wish I had read it 20yrs. ago . For a while I just dropped the Yankee instead of reefing the main first , and yes I got crazy weather helm ! Thanks Bob now I have to go buy a new Yankee cut to BP specs.
 

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"or the worst one, "cutter rigged ketch". We already have all the terms we need to describe rigs that have been around for 200 years."
if you quote something, do not rip it out of its context...
you missed that part just before your quote:
"I'll tell you what annoys me a wee bit. I hate those cute names like "slutter" and "cutter rigged sloop" ...

so in the end, it reads:
"I'll tell you what annoys me a wee bit. I hate those cute names like "slutter" and "cutter rigged sloop" or the worst one, "cutter rigged ketch". We already have all the terms we need to describe rigs that have been around for 200 years."
 

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Okay, so cutter, sloop and slutter are grey. Maybe it's just me, but I'm really starting to like the term slutter. Although, I think it has nothing to do with sail plan at all.
 
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Maybe get Walt Schultz here to talk about slutters? Thought he was the one to use the term first and put them on Shannons.
Have mast head sloop with 130,solent, and separate detachable stay for nice orange storm jib. Three stays for three head sails. Still think of it as a masthead sloop. Have hydraulic backstay but doesn't do much but get rid of headstay sag. Think main advantage for cruiser of fractional rig is you can really change shape of mast.
Think sloop mast forward of station four. Think cutter mast at station four or aft. Ketch mizzen in front of rudder post and >20% of sailplan. Yawl mizzen behind rudder post. Schooner foresail smaller or equal to mainsail. Think headsails in modern rigs are not major determinants as you can add and subtract but it's hard to move a mast. Then again I may have my head up my butt.
 

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A ketch with a mizzen that is the same hight and area of the main is almost a schooner, or a sketch.
It IS a schooner - an equal masted schooner. A ketch, by definition, has the mizzen mast smaller than the main mast (and ahead of the rudder post).

Some of the old time "ship" sized schooners had up to seven equal masts.

I like the term Slutter simply because of the pejorative connotations it implies - it's just a bit of fun. The one that really grates on me is "cutter ketch" instead of double headsail ketch.

I'm a natural born spelling Nazi but I think this stuff transcends that. Nautical, aviation, engineering lingo - anything where clarity and certainty of speech can save or cost lives - should be used correctly and corruptions, no matter how trivial, should be condemned.
 

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Thank you Bob Perry!
"I hate those cute names like "slutter" and "cutter rigged sloop" or the worst one, "cutter rigged ketch". We already have all the terms we need to describe rigs that have been around for 200 years. A sloop is a sloop. If someone chooses to add a staysail it's still a sloop."
- Bob Perry
We have a friend who insists calling his boat (sister ship to ours) a cutter rigged ketch. It drives me crazy.
Thank you Bob Perry!
 
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