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Master Mariner
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Discussion Starter #1
Are cruisers soon to find no discharge zones world wide for their watermaker brine?
 

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bell ringer
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The story never really says what the problem is. Just basically saying that the brine is "saltier" seems meaningless. And it is worth noting that boating No Discharge Zones do in fact have LOTS of treated sewage being discharged from municipal treatment plants.
 

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Master Mariner
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Discussion Starter #3
The story never really says what the problem is. Just basically saying that the brine is "saltier" seems meaningless. And it is worth noting that boating No Discharge Zones do in fact have LOTS of treated sewage being discharged from municipal treatment plants.
Actually I think it does mention something about metals that are expelled in quantities sufficient to be mined from the brine.
If the tree huggers think the copper leaching from our antifouling paint is so bad that we shouldn't be using it, what do you think they'll do when they get a grip on this?
 

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bell ringer
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Actually I think it does mention something about metals that are expelled in quantities sufficient to be mined from the brine.
It does. But I just assumed that was because the written was only interested in trolling the tree huggers etc and couldn't be concerned that pretty much all the metals that come into the RO plant leave with the brine water.

I have sold chemicals to RO water plants before. Except for cleaning chemicals, most of what they use are flocculants that make it easier to separate the the "stuff" out. They are pretty much the same flocculants that a water or wastewater treatment plant uses to do the same thing.
 

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Master Mariner
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Discussion Starter #5
It does. But I just assumed that was because the written was only interested in trolling the tree huggers etc and couldn't be concerned that pretty much all the metals that come into the RO plant leave with the brine water.

I have sold chemicals to RO water plants before. Except for cleaning chemicals, most of what they use are flocculants that make it easier to separate the the "stuff" out. They are pretty much the same flocculants that a water or wastewater treatment plant uses to do the same thing.
I may be way off, but I got the impression that these metals were from the water, not additives. I can't see why the desert countries couldn't expel the brine into the sand. Maybe the vegetable matter from the sea water would revitalize the sand? Not my field of expertise, but an interesting thought, don't you think?
 

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They make 95 million cubic meters of fresh water while dumping 142 million cubic meter of brine. Pretty good efficiency IMHO. If this is really a problem, suck raw sea water into the discharge pipe to dilute the brine. The solution to pollution is dilution.
 

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Wonder if some enterprising lad would think to capture the discharge and further evaporate it into desirable sea salt. Perhaps there’s an economy, if it’s half way there already. The additional water vapor, from evaporation, will increase cloud coverage, thereby cool the earth down. The tree huggers would have an organism. Of course, the socialists will be upset that anyone took the risk and made a good return on their investment, so it will eventually close.
 
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