SailNet Community banner
41 - 52 of 52 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,704 Posts
Interesting that one of the knots I use frequently on my boats which is not mentioned by any other contributors is the rolling hitch which is very useful for unloading another line (winch overwinds, siezed knots, etc) and also for attaching a line to the middle of another.

An example of the second application is anchoring stern-to (mediteranean anchoring I belive it's called). An anchor out the front, two stern lines to the dock but then, to position your boat nicely between your neighbours you may need to apply some sideways tension. A rolling hitch onto the middle of the appropriate stern line will let you accurately position the boat when the new line is attached to the middle of your toerail.

I haven't got a picture of the knot but will try to describe it: Holding the new rope against the existing one, make three or four wraps around the existing one in the direction that you wish to apply the pressure. Then take the end over the wraps, past the standing part of the new rope and make another hitch around the original line and pull it tight. The rope is then used by pulling it in the direction of the wraps. Very strong, will never slip and always easy to undo.

There must be a booklet somewhere that describes it better than I did. Learn it, you'll use it more and more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Interesting that one of the knots I use frequently on my boats which is not mentioned by any other contributors is the rolling hitch which is very useful for unloading another line (winch overwinds, siezed knots, etc) and also for attaching a line to the middle of another.

An example of the second application is anchoring stern-to (mediteranean anchoring I belive it's called). An anchor out the front, two stern lines to the dock but then, to position your boat nicely between your neighbours you may need to apply some sideways tension. A rolling hitch onto the middle of the appropriate stern line will let you accurately position the boat when the new line is attached to the middle of your toerail.

I haven't got a picture of the knot but will try to describe it: Holding the new rope against the existing one, make three or four wraps around the existing one in the direction that you wish to apply the pressure. Then take the end over the wraps, past the standing part of the new rope and make another hitch around the original line and pull it tight. The rope is then used by pulling it in the direction of the wraps. Very strong, will never slip and always easy to undo.

There must be a booklet somewhere that describes it better than I did. Learn it, you'll use it more and more.
The rolling hitch is nicely described in Greg's page (still my favorite):
http://www.animatedknots.com/rollin...ge=LogoGrog.jpg&Website=www.animatedknots.com

Edit: I checked back and saw that SD had the rolling hitch in his post #24. He used th name Tautline hitch (same knot).
I did a lot of climbing when I was young and I used prusik knot for this purpose. Now I use rolling hitch as well. Both work well for the purpose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
415 Posts
Can you believe that a lot of real sailors never saw the Ashey's book and they still use the right knot for the right job.
The first book I read about knots was "Rupko Godec: Vozli", published in 1952 in Slovene language. His wife Ančka Gošnik Godec made the drawings for the book.
The book is amazing considering the resource available in a destroyed country, just few years after world war 2. I do not have that book any more, so I can not check if he mentioned any references, but I doubt he knew about Ashley book, which was published just 7 years earlier.
Between 1945 and 1955 the borders were quite sealed and it was not possible to get foreign literature - especially not from the US.
History aside.
I was referring to Ashley #1735 as a rolling hitch. It holds much better then #1734 and I believe also better then #1736 (but this is my opinion).

And tenuki, I believe your training times are over and you became a real AFOC long time ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
980 Posts
Knot Knot Joke

A piece of string walks into a bar.
Bartender says: Hey, you piece if string, get out, we don't serve your kind here.
String leaves, rearranges himself and then goes back in.
Bartender says: Hey, aren't you that piece of string that I just told to leave?
String says: No, I'm a frayed knot.

 

·
Telstar 28
Joined
·
992 Posts
Jim, you are right.
The Tautline hitch is a rolling hitch on a loop. So they are technically two different knots.
However as it is the same basic knot that forms both, so if you know one you know them both.
I am glad that you made it clear.
Well, a Sheet Bend is the same "knot" as a bowline, which is a sheet bend tied to a loop in the bight of the standing portion of the line. This is very true of many knots... however calling a bowline a sheetbend is a big mistake-since they serve very different purposes. :D
 
41 - 52 of 52 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top