SailNet Community banner

1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Hi there my name is Douglas and I'm new to sailnet. I'm writing looking for some guidance as I select a new daysailer. I imagine that at least some of you understand how difficult this can be. No one boat can be all things at all times and there are so many ways a boat can be appealing that the combination of compromises one could make is mind numbing.

I happen to think that the older sloops just have wonderful lines. The overhanging ends, modest beam, performance oriented yachts appeal to me. There is one boat in particular which has caught my eye and it is a mystery to me.

The ad (cl los angeles) reads 1943 pedersen design Viking Sailboat 18ft Sloop HISTORICAL. I know a Viking Yachts, and they started by buying Peterson-Viking (New Jersey!). But that Viking is sport fishing.

The Viking line of sailboats are all plastic as far as I know and most of them are C&C?

Pederson is a Scandinavian name and at least one was a marine architect and did design boats but I get no further.

Also my eye might be way off, but is that sloop only 18 feet? If the add read 25 I wouldn't have thought anything odd looking at the photos.

So I guess all I really know is that she's pretty - and after all what else could we possibly want from a vessel which will be come our life support system for hours (if not days) at a time?

There's a lot you can tell from the photos: self tacking jib with a very simple set up (aleron express 28). Based on the aft leaning rudder shaft (shields) I'd say it was skeg mounted rudder. Which leads me to believe that this has a modified full keel (or so I was taught to call it, though some of the literature of the period described these keels as "fin").

So while much of the yacht is true to the type in the fifties, a pointed cabin top and a club foot should narrow this down.

There are more or less 5 photos attached. I have another photo - a montage, and one of the photos in the montage is also the last (black and white) photo from the ad. The other source does not put a LOA on the boat they only identify it as a "1943 Viking Daysailer".

I'd appreciate any help in learing what I can about this boat. I'd love a line drawing, capabilities etc. Sail area, displacement all that. Who built it?

Thanks for reading...
Douglas
 

Attachments

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
You'll learn a lot more by calling the ad poster and taking a look and asking the ad poster all of these questions. That's what I'd do if I were looking for a boat.
Thanks! I appreciate that and of course I've reached out to the poster. But it was the poster who misidentified the boat in the first place? And the poster came by the boat in a bit of a round about way and I get the impression that if you asked for a sheet you'd get a comforter too :)
 

·
Member
Joined
·
599 Posts
You're right - she is pretty!

But a beautiful yacht is like a beautiful woman - she'll cost your fortune and break your heart ;-)

There are a lot of good threads on this site for inspecting a sailboat - and as this looks like a "woody" if work is needed in can get expensive fast. The photo indicates a 2011 CA reg, and so could be older photos not reflecting her current condition. When you visit her look carefully for the serial number/ID - should be permanently affixed somewhere, often the transom or in the v-berth. That should tell you the manufacturer and the year of manufacture.

Depending on your experience, you may want to ask a couple of sailor friends to come along with you ro check her out.

Finally - I assume you enjoy varnishing? Looks like a lot of brightwork. Not complaining - I love shiny wood - but be aware before you get into it that a lot of ongoing work will be needed to keep her looking pretty!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
You're right - she is pretty!

But a beautiful yacht is like a beautiful woman - she'll cost your fortune and break your heart ;-)

There are a lot of good threads on this site for inspecting a sailboat - and as this looks like a "woody" if work is needed in can get expensive fast. The photo indicates a 2011 CA reg, and so could be older photos not reflecting her current condition. When you visit her look carefully for the serial number/ID - should be permanently affixed somewhere, often the transom or in the v-berth. That should tell you the manufacturer and the year of manufacture.

[snip]
Hey Paul, great eye for the registration, thanks. I suspect from other angels the boat has been kicking around looking for a home. That explains a lot of the mystery and also deepens the concerns. But there's also reason to believe the boat was in fine condition a few years back and that in the intervening years the worst it has suffered is a want of use.

Tacking her in a breeze will tell me a lot and maybe that will be enough to end this madness. The biggest hurdle is to find someone who is competent to survey the boat. I'm smart enough to notice there's a problem when I step on something and it's soft or mushy.

That's the wood part. Another concern I have is that people modify their boats. It would be nice to see an original plan just to know that what I'm looking at is more or less the boat which was designed and built.


Douglas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
267 Posts
DrakeParagon has posted a series of detailed videos of interviews with the owners of the wooden boat "Southern Cross". I found the videos pretty cool and the owner is a real genius when it comes to his little upgrades. Anyway there is some detail about the reality of wooden boat ownership, both positive and negative. Thought you might find it useful, or at least entertaining.

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/cruis...nds-southern-cross-dickerson-41-sailboat.html

Great alias by the way. Are you a programmer?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
DrakeParagon has posted a series of detailed videos of interviews with the owners of the wooden boat "Southern Cross". I found the videos pretty cool and the owner is a real genius when it comes to his little upgrades. Anyway there is some detail about the reality of wooden boat ownership, both positive and negative. Thought you might find it useful, or at least entertaining.

[snip: the robot won't let me quote a hyperlink]

Great alias by the way. Are you a programmer?
In reverse order, yes I broke into programming with what4, a version of fortran. I appreciate the kind words.

Thanks for the tip on the video I am excited to watch it and benefit from first hand experience.

Douglas
 

·
One of None
Joined
·
8,040 Posts
Douglas. it's a wooden boat. It's not likely you will find the plans. You could, if you ARE serious Join the wooden boat forum and start a thread there. Lots of knowledge over there. I'm there.. same name too DeniseO30
anyway. If you don't know about wooden boat construction, how to maintain, repair ribs, planks, etc, Don't! buy it! I saw the ad and at $800.00 it's affordable but.. do not buy it again, if you don't get it out of the water and properly inspected. Another thing. if it is traditionally built hull.. you can't dry it out for repairs unless you plan to refasten and recaulk, paint and relaunch entire hull.

Viking Yachts Job and Employment Web Site there is a short history of what happened to peterson viking.. they are... no more.. unless you want a 40 ft+ yacht.
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,288 Posts
Listen to Denise. Nothing will kill a newbies sailing dreams quicker than an old wood boat.

If you want a long term woodworking project, buy it.

If you want to sail, get a cheap glass boat - you can get them anywhere from free on up. Lots of them look good too.
 

·
Old enough to know better
Joined
·
4,344 Posts
That is a nice looking boat, but I would not worry about a survey. That small of a wood boat a survey would likely be a ten times more than you should pay for it. If you can't stick a screw driver into it, then offer the guy $50 bucks. But don't expect to ever sail it. It is a project you put in your back yard and tinker around with for 20 years, just to get away from the wife. If you want to sail, find something plastic! Unless it has some kind of providence wood boats unfortunately have essentially no value. even worse than fiberglass.

And the survey don't worry about it, get one just before insuring it in 20 years after you have rebuilt it. And I love wooden boats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
[snip] Join the wooden boat forum and start a thread there. Lots of knowledge over there. I'm there.. same name too DeniseO30
anyway. [snip]
I actually tired to post there but the obstacles are too high. Forms points you to the FAQ which has a "push this button and select register" there is no register field on the page which comes up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #13
The Cape Dory Typhoon daysailer is a pretty boat too. Lots of them around.
Yes it is and I haven't ever seen on here on the west coast that I remember. While I do respect what Alberg has done with the cape dory little crusers aren't really my thing. I'd prefer the folkboat over the typhoon. That doesn't make me right and Alberg and the thousands who love their pocket cruser wrong. Just personal preferences.
 

·
Tartan 27' owner
Joined
·
5,241 Posts
In reverse order, yes I broke into programming with what4, a version of fortran. I appreciate the kind words.

Douglas
WAT4, yikes! You are even older than I am! I started out in COBOL.

If it is a Folkboat you want then keep looking for that. Follow your muse.

Also, Wooden Boat Forum should not be that difficult to join for a former bit bender.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
13 Posts
Discussion Starter #16
WAT4, yikes! You are even older than I am! I started out in COBOL.

If it is a Folkboat you want then keep looking for that. Follow your muse.

Also, Wooden Boat Forum should not be that difficult to join for a former bit bender.
ouch! I'm not THAT old... I refused to take cobol or accounting. Right now I'm thinking - 'oh heck no, by all means avoid exposure to women and money'.

There's a folkboat up in Eurika which has just been completely redone and she's a beauty. However there's enough demand for the things that you have to pay a reasonable price. The one thing where plastic has a huge advantage is cost. So the folkboat has to sit beside some pretty nice alternatives price wise. Not that that would stop me if I really wanted one.

They have a very modest SAD, slow disp/lwl and short lwl. Now up in San Fransisco Bay where you routinely sail in brisk conditions all of that works to the boat's advantage. The displacement beats down the bay chop and all those numbers go out the door on a plane. There's almost always enough wind on the bay to get the boat up. Down here in So Cal having enough air is often a concern.

I'm thinking this is the a home for the uldb. I spent some time on a santa cruz 27 in santa cruz. I lot of the time it was fun and always when we were racing. I'm the kind of idiot who gets a kick out of a death roll. But if you put some lubbers in the boat for quiet afternoon and you get any kind of a chop the boat became unpleasant. It wanted six hundred pounds on its rail and can't understand why perfectly good meat is going to waste in the cockpit. And even there getting wet.

All of this is pushing me towards a "modest displacement" performance daysailer. I've spent time on a shields and that would do nicely, except I'd have to get on a waiting list to bring one into the local marina. There are empty slips for 28 footers. Besides 8m should be plenty for me.

Wanting a 8m more than 2 ton eliminates all the the newer metric rockets and I won't pay what a J80 costs. Oh the other hand, I don't want a comfortable cabin. No microwave, no oven, no color tv. A real marine head would be nice, but ...

Anyway the whatisit caught my eye because it seems to me that if I'm looking at 3 ton and 8m this is right in heart of where a wooden yacht can be competitive. And since the Spartan accommodations in an older wooden boat is attractive to me that sort of evens the playing field cost wise.

To give the devil his due I have found a pair of half tonners: newport 27 and a hawkfarm. Both have the kind of numbers I'm looking for (5700 lbs 19 sad 200 disp/lwl). I've never sailed either and hadn't even heard of the hawkfarm until I saw the ad so how either of them sail? The newport's sails look like a patchwork quilt so taking it out wouldn't tell me much either. I'm sure the boat could be put into service, but I'd rather buy a boat with all that done already. I'll refit her after we've had a chance to get to know one another and develop the kind of commitment that warrants the nightmare a major refit can wind up being.

The hawkfarm might be sail away ready but the owner is not being very responsive. Troubles troubles troubles. Boat's a pain in the tootie and I don't even own one :)
 

·
Senior Moment Member
Joined
·
13,288 Posts
WAT4, yikes! You are even older than I am! I started out in COBOL.
No-one's older than COBOL - Grace Hopper created it, along with the term "De-bugging". ;)

Anyone else remember PL1? That was the big new deal when I started at IBM.
 

·
One of None
Joined
·
8,040 Posts
I actually tired to post there but the obstacles are too high. Forms points you to the FAQ which has a "push this button and select register" there is no register field on the page which comes up.
Don't know what your talking about but it's probably a glitz
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
Top