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I am generally in agreement with the thought that there advantages to keeping your systems simple, but I also think there has to be a balance.

This month I read a piece in Cruising World about a couple that is cruising the world in an Beneteau Oceanis 345 (I may have the model number wrong but it was an Oceanis of 34 or 35 feet). That caught my eye right away, as it may be a good coastal cruiser but seemed like a highly questionable choice for blue water cruising.

But then they really got my attention by saying that they found the systems too complicated, removed the engine for more storage, and opted for a sextant over a GPS. The magazine did not offer any counterpoint, although we may eventually see some letters to the editor.

Did anyone else see this? Are these sound judgments or are they simply Luddites?
 

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Señor Member
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Could just be me, but...

My take on the article was that it was a tongue-in-cheek piece on the overall net worth of dockside/marina advice...

PF
 

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Señor Member
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That would explain a lot of things. I'm embarassed if I missed that.
No need for a red face -- I had to think about it before I started to see between the lines. It was thought provoking, though, was it not?
 

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I agree, it was intended as tonque in cheek.


I hope.

I've heard of folks living on 22 ft pop top catalina's with 4hp outboards; but those are the trolls that escaping alimony in the sun, not normal.

I hope.
 

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Once known as Hartley18
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But then they really got my attention by saying that they found the systems too complicated, removed the engine for more storage, and opted for a sextant over a GPS. The magazine did not offer any counterpoint, although we may eventually see some letters to the editor.

Did anyone else see this? Are these sound judgments or are they simply Luddites?
I haven't read the article, but am often amused by the warnings associated with GPS units that they "shouldn't be the only means of navigation". Reading behind the lines there, every modern boatie should be using a sextant - just to make sure the GPS position is right - because a sextant position can't possibly be wrong, can it? ;)

I have yet to meet a stinkpotter who even knows what a sextant is - let alone knows how to use one... :rolleyes:

Very thought-provoking.
 
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