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Discussion Starter #1
This was sort of prompted by "Captain Jack's" thread on the seaworthiness of a "free" boat.

I don't mean this to be a judgement on that boat in particular but I am curious. Although one could repair almost anything, at a certain point it no longer makes financial sense. So what does one do with an old boat no one will take?

I'm sure some of the parts may be useful but once you get down to the hull, it seems to me that that's not going to be so easy to get rid of.

I'm talking about boats say between 20 and 40 feet.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Huh,

Found this on eHow. Local laws might differ but I guess you can just send them to the bottom.

Fiberglass Boats
Fiberglass boats are an interesting exception to normal fiberglass rules. According United States ocean and environment standards, fiberglass materials cannot be dumped overboard. However, boats made of fiberglass do not fall under these guidelines, and legally they can be left derelict as long as they sink and do not continue to float above the water. These fiberglass boats cannot be used to make man-made jetties or reefs.



Read more: How is Fiberglass Disposed of? | eHow


Some of the old iron mines in the Northern part of the state have filled with water and are popular with divers. One of them has a boat on a trailer sitting on the bottom.
 

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This conundrum is why all boat yards have several abandon vessels.
 

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I think that there are many boats out there which need to be scrapped due to their condition (too expensive to restore, serious structural problems). Salvage any useful items, including keels (lead scrap is 75 cents a pound!), cut up the hulls (concrete cutting saw will do it fast and cheap when dealing with thick hulls), or if they can be floated take them out into deep water and sink them. Have done it to a couple of smaller boats I could not sell. Got more for parts than I was asking for the whole thing.
 

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Give it an honorable death. Give it a Viking funeral, then take a trip to your insurance agent with a different story. True, there won`t be any honor in the conversation, but, Hey, all the way to the bank baby. They take your money, so why not take theirs in return.
 

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The ones with lead keels are easy to get rid of. We took a 26 footer to a local scrapyard and he was happy to get it.

Of course we did have a low boy fifth wheel trailer and a one ton truck, along with a crane to set the boat on top it. The scrap yard was five miles inland.
 

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Some years ago I argued for weeks with many members of this forum about the concept of discarding of glass and metal over the side when voyaging instead of saving it for the next available dumpster - I was told that I was seriously contributing to the eco-end-of-the-world and was totally irresponsible and should be ashamed of myself.

Now it seems we're OK with dumping the whole boat "over the side".

Amazing how things evolve.

Nothing has changed for me though - when I'm at sea I still put my glass and metal over the side.;)
 
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