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Discussion Starter #1
When you are storing an engine, unused, please take the precaution of turning it a little say once a month or so, or if you cannot, then run some lubricant on to the top of the pistons (via the inlet valve, or pull the injectors to do it).
If you don't, the motor is likely to corrode internally and will be very difficult to move, if ever.
I speak from recent experience - a guy on the same dock said he had a Volvo MD17D (mine is the MD 17C) and that it only had 2000 hours on it (it does).
He had stored it in his garage for about 7 years, and i made him an offer for it.
I got it home, but it will not turn. There is a slight movement of the flywheel, but now some 2 weeks later, it still had that slight movement and it is not improving.
I have tried flooding it with various releasing agents via the injector ports, but it is not responding to a breaker bar (or other persuasion).
Things do not look good, and to have to break it is a pity as there is very little wrong with it otherwise.

And all for want of just the occasional rotation of the crank!
 

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How was the engine pickled when it was put away? Cylinders should be treated with fogging oil, at a min. There are pickling oils that promise to stay adhered longer, which require pulling the injectors at storage. Too many don't do it.

Good advice to move it occasionally, but that alone isn't going to prevent corrosion. Perhaps it will prevent the seize you're experiencing. It needs to be lubricated. Keeping the motor well above the dew point, or better yet, in a dry environment helps too.

The cheap hack to free a stored seized cylinder is to top the cylinder with diesel fuel and let it sit for a day and work it's way past the rings. Once free, you'll be flushing the crankcase, of course.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
Minn :
I have tried every concoction I can think of or has been recommended for about two weeks.
WD40.
50/50 mix of ATF and acetone.
ACF50.

Still the flywheel barely moves - just the slightest "clunk", and moving about 1/2 a tooth and it's a big flywheel on the MD17D.
I am not optimistic.
The worst that happens is that I break it for spare parts. It is a mine of spares and should keep my own motor - a C model - going for a while yet.
In a week or two we will pull the heads and try a bit more force, and perhaps a bit of heat.
Failing that we will have to drop the sump, disconnect the big ends and take the barrels to a hydraulic press. That will shift the pistons or nothing will.

Rockter.
 

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Pull the head and have a look maybe? Sounds like it wasn’t properly pickled, so may be trash.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
It was never pickled.
If i can get the pistons to move, I can at least get it running, then store it for bits.
If it doesn't run, I will break it and store the bits in a diesel bath, or something.
I cannot go too far wrong, really.
Parts for these older motors are rare, often already worn, and very expensive indeed.
 

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Not familiar with that particular engine but can you remove timing gear/chain. with less parts in the game, a breaker bar over bolts in the flywheel/ ,Goodly whacks with wood club or 4x4 Forth and back. If it's rings but moving a bit. all may be well yet.
 

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...................... Things do not look good said:
All is NOT lost. The prime caution is: DO NOT ***FORCE*** the crankshaft or you will risk breaking your piston rings. Suggestion: 'soak' the cylinders with a table spoon of "Marvel Mystery Oil" or other 'penetrating oil', in each cylinder every few day and GENTLY Rock the crankshaft (nose bolt) back and forth with a socket on a long breaker bar .... it may take some time (days or weeeks) to break loose so dont lose patience. DO NOT Force, DO NOT USE the STARTER until the engine is FREE to spin.

Once loose and relatively easy to turn ... by HAND, start engine AT NO LOAD speed, change oil with a mix of oil ansd 1/4 Marvel Mystery Oil ..... let idle (NO LOAD) while increasing rpm over several HOURS in order to repolish the cylinder walls, piston ring grooves etc. PATIENCE - do nnot rush and do not FORCE.
 

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If/when you get your engine to turn over, crank the engine to build up oil pressure without compression in the cylinders (injectors removed) before attempting to start it. Better for all bearing surfaces.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Chas...
It's just not moving, now some 2 weeks on.
Looks very much like the heads have to come off and I will try persuasion on the top of the pistons.
Failing that, I will drop the sump, disconnect the con-rods, lift the barrels with the pistons and take them to a hydraulic press.

Rockter.
 

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Are the cylinders sleeved? If one had to hydraulically press the pistons out, the walls must be toast. Not sure I'd bother.

However, if you pull the head off, you can more easily keep a covering of penetrating fluid on the pistons.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Minn...
It's a mine of spare parts.
Even a cylinder jacket changes hands for (like) £250.
I have flooded it via the injector ports with copious quantities of releasing fluid.
The piston tops are well-wetted already.

Rockter.
 

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If you're willing to presumably trash the cylinder and piston, get all the current goo out and bath in white vinegar. The longer you leave it, the more rust/material will be eaten away. Diluting the vinegar with 50% water works fine too, just takes longer. Could keep it from getting carried away.
 

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Chas...
It's just not moving, now some 2 weeks on.
Looks very much like the heads have to come off and I will try persuasion on the top of the pistons.
Failing that, I will drop the sump, disconnect the con-rods, lift the barrels with the pistons and take them to a hydraulic press.

Rockter.
If the pistons are as stuck as you say the engine will have to come apart to repair it correctly. The rings may be frozen in their grooves. Even if you get the crank to turn and pistons to move the rings may be stuck and gunked up too much to move in their grooves as needed.

Remove the rod caps. (Keep them in order) They need to be replaced on the same rod and in the same direction. You could mark each one with a center punch or awl to identify their position and direction.

If each cylinder sleeve and piston can come out as a frozen unit that's even better.
If not remove the crankshaft doing the same thing with the main caps as they are removed.

Using a hardwood block (end grain) and a hammer tap on the top of each piston to attempt to move the piston down the cylinder. You may break rings and/or pistons while trying this. Pound only above the piston boss above the holes the piston pin goes through. If you are going this far the rings should be replaced.

If you want to use a press then make a disc a bit smaller that the piston dia. to put in the cylinder on the piston head to spread pressure across the head.
-CH
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Chas :

Thanks.
Soon we will give it a try.
I must say i am surprised. 7 years in a garage and it locks up like that???
 

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I have had some luck after removing the head by filling the cylinders with diesel and leaving the breaker bar under tension from a 2 ton bottle jack, adding just a touch more tension each day if it doesn't seem to be over stressing. It may still take weeks, but the constant pressure, like a prop puller may just do the trick.
Good luck
 

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Is it possible that something other than stuck pistons are cause of the crank not turning? The valve train? Or anything driven by the crank?
-CH
 
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