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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I own a Herreshoff Leeboard Ketch-design #107 in Sensible Cruising Designs-she is professionally built exactly to the plans in carvel planked NZ kauri, and launched in 1980.I have cruised many thousands of miles in this lovely boat and I have strong emotional ties to it.
My predicament is this-I am 75 years old and an illness means I can no longer sail without a crew--A serious illness early last year meant I could no longer visit the boat,but I did have an associate keeping a watch on her for me.
I was cleared of my serious illness in December and on revisiting the boat,while she was still in fine shape,I have noticed a patch of rot in the foredeck approx. 3 square feet in size.-The deck is worn teak over double diagonal half inch timber,and this rot has gone through to the bottom diagonal and is visible from inside the boat.-I do not know if I have rot in other places of the deck.
Prudence tells me I should haul the boat to a shed facility and remove the whole deck and cabin tops,repair any deck beam damage and replace the deck with glassed over ply.There was a time I could do this work but age has caught up and I am no longer physically capable.If these repairs were to be made I would have to employ a boatbuilder to do the work for me and to put it simply I do not have the finances to take this option.
I am left with the idea of placing the boat with a broker at a reduced price to allow for the repairs to be made,my only concern is that due to the deck situation possibly the boat may be "unsaleable"-or-if I source some funds to make the repair,the final selling price may be insufficient to repay these repair costs.
I realise that I am stuck between a rock and a hard place on this one,but I would really appreciate any advice,maybe from folk who have been down this road before and have had experiences.
I live in New Zealand where boatbuilders rates are reasonable but still beyond
my current financial situation.
Sincere thanks in advance
 

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Master Mariner
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I can't say I've been there yet, but?
How about seeking a younger partner. An agreement where he does the work now and general maintenance under your direction and sails with you until you no longer wish to sail, and then he gets the boat. This could serve to insure your knowledge isn't lost and give the right younger person and opportunity to own a classic vessel he normally couldn't afford.
It might take some looking, but in this internet age, it is at least possible.
 

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One of None
Hunter 34
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If it is indeed a Herreshoff , My first suggestion; contact the Herreshoff Museum in Rhode Island Herreshoff Marine Museum & America's Cup Hall of Fame

I'd then then suggest you contact someone that writes well about boats and do a write up to send in when you contact the wooden boat magazine and see it can be featured or at the very least put an ad on WB.

WoodenBoat Magazine | WoodenBoat, Small Boats, Getting Started in Boats, and Professional BoatBuilder

Then Join the wooden boat forum and re-explain the plight. (very common sad to say) :(

http:
//forum.woodenboat.com/index.php


New England USA is and will surely always be the best place for Herreshoff knowledge and collectors. Mystic seaport Museum is also a good place to contract.

Lastly.. photos.. a photo essay from when she was new to now would be a great tool to help you sell her.

The name is what will save and hopefully sell your boat sir. I wish you well!

She look something like this?
 
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Captain Obvious
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Why don't you just pay a yard to repair the 3' rotted section? Then (if you want to sell) the buyers surveyor will pick it up,or you disclose it and the buyer makes up their own mind and hopefully the boat gets a new owner.

Everybody wins.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thank you all for your kind and helpful advice-there were paths here that I had not considered.Maybe I overstated the boats condition,she is really in near perfect condition other than the deck-to this end I would prefer to get some money for her rather than treat as a donation,as previously stated I am a bit cash poor.
Thank you Denise for your input-Many years ago I visited the Herreshoff Museum and did discuss my boat with staff,there was not a lot of interest which I felt was due to her being a L Francis design-albeit his very last-and not Nathaniel.--The New Zealand builder of this boat,the late Wayne Roberts, has already featured in Wooden Boat when he was called on to go to San Fran with a view to saving a large 1903 (I think) Nat Herreshoff.The boat was beyond repair so Wayne and his crew obtained the plans and built a brand new 1903 boat for the owner.--One difficulty I have is living in New Zealand,at the bottom of the world,would be the freight cost involved in shipping her.The pic you posted is of Golden Ball,which is mentioned extensively in LFH book The Compleat Cruiser--while the Leebord Ketch is only 38 feet long and has much more style and grace.At this stage I am unsure on how to post pics.
I know the Pardy's very well,and other than advice,unfortunatly I do not think that Larry would be physically capable of effecting repairs these days.
Again my sincere thanks for all the suggestions of which I will give serious thought.-Chris
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Why don't you just pay a yard to repair the 3' rotted section? Then (if you want to sell) the buyers surveyor will pick it up,or you disclose it and the buyer makes up their own mind and hopefully the boat gets a new owner.

Everybody wins.
I have thought of this Sal,but all I talk to say there is likely to be further rot elsewhere in the deck-being double diagonal construction with a teak overlay,it would be necessary to remove all teak to examine the top diagonals for signs of rot,and this would get expensive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I thought I should give an update on the outcome of Tern.I have ended up selling her at a very reasonable price to Jed Roberts,the 32 year old son of the original builder Wayne Roberts.Jed had been overseas for a number of years only recently returning to NZ.His two sisters are also returning from Australia to live here and his mother has also returned so it is a complete family reunion,boat and all.It is a pretty emotional time as I bought the boat from Wayne some 30 years ago and have sailed many thousands of miles in her and she has now done full circle.I am happy that my association has ended with a great outcome.
A happy festive season to all.
Chris
 

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Chris- Thanks for the update on Tern. I am about your age with many boat projects and I think know some of how you feel about passing on your boat to the next generation so to speak. I have been a follower of LFH for many years having had Meadowlarks, built a Rozinante, had Quiet Tune in my care, and now have a Marco Polo Schooner.
30 years ago my wife and I had joined some friends in Tahiti and finished our voyage across the Pacific at Opua and because I had some friends on the NZ Bounty we worked our way down to Whangarai. Over in the marina I spotted a bow which I knew had to be LFH! I went around to the marina to find your Tern under those spars and lovely she was. I was aware of the aft cabin on Golden Ball so was amazed to see how well Tern had included that feature. I have enjoyed since then seeing often references to Tern out there in the world, often though John. B. Tern is a wonderful boat and I am glad t ohear it is working out the best for you and her and family. Cheers/ Bob Wallace
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for your nice story and kind words Bob-When you saw Tern at Whangarei she was still owned by Wayne and family as he was working at Smiths boat yard at that time.At that stage there would have been two little blondies aboard,one being Jed,the current owner.Wayne originally had the aft cockpit as per the original two page plans,but converted to centre cockpit with an aft cabin so the kids had somewhere safe to be during the passage to Tahiti.
I have certainly enjoyed my time with Tern,the armfuls of race trophies we have won,the coastal cruises,two five month stints up in the Pacific islands,the list goes on.I know John B very well,in fact we raced against him last weekend in the Russell Boating Club annual Tall Ships Race,this was my swansong race where we went all out to win including extensive use of the leaboards and a borrowed mizzen staysail,it was not to be as light airs and wild windshifts went against us.
Your ownership list of LFH designed boats is pretty impressive,I have always liked Quiet Tune,in fact Wayne and I often discussed building one when he was still alive.
I have been spending the last few days aboard Tern with Jed showing him the ropes so to speak,he reminds me so much of his father it is scary.He is head over heels with Tern and I have been watching him from my home, out sailing single handed around the Bay while he waits for his partner to return from Scotland.He has great plans for Terns future,including hauling her to his dads boat workshop,which he inherited, to replace the deck etc.All this warms my heart knowing Tern is in good hands,and it was never about the money,in fact I turned down some way better cash offers.
Regards
Chris Powell
 

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Hi Bob,
i just bought the Rozinante you mentioned above from David Reid. he cruised in her and raced her quite successfully at the wednesday evening races in marblehead. she wintered around the corner from LFHs castle...
David took great care of her, and I will try to do the same.
i was told you had corresponded with LFH when you built the Rozinante.
would love to learn more about her story ...
thanks for building such a solid, beautiful and fast boat!

michael
 

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Ecclesiastes 3:1-8 Popularized by the Byrds in Turn, Turn, Turn.

For everything there is a season. At 75 the days of being more than an excited passenger is looming ominously in your future. Time is a predator stalking us all. I would advertise for resume's of the next owner. One caveat, they have to take you out several times per season.
 
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