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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Didn't want to hijack the "Theft proof you dinghy" thread so I've started this one, though they are similar.

After many years of rowing a home built dink to the boat, she's out in Milford harbor on a floating dock mooring, I've finally broken down and bought a Bombard inflatable and a 5hp Mariner outboard. The plan is to be able to deflate the dink, stow it in a lazerette, then stow the outboard while we sail Long Island sound this summer. My question is this, where does everyone stow their outboards?

The boat is a 26 foot Seafarer and has a stern swim ladder in the middle of the pushpit. I "think" the pushpit would be strong enough to hang the motor on but it does weigh 45lbs. Lot's of added weight. I suppose I could fabricate or :eek: "buy" a bracket to bolt to the stern, but I'm notoriously cheap. (see above, home built dink, rowed for many years) instead of hanging it on the SS pushpit. I might also be able to fit it into one of the lazerettes but I need to fabricate something to hang it on, don't want it flopping around in there! The last option I see is to put it inside, under one of the quarterberths but who likes the smell of gasoline? Even run drive, I never seem to get all of the gas out of it!

For short trips, I can forsee dragging the dink, inflated, with the motor still mounted (and securly locked) to the dinghy but ther will be times I'd want to get it out and stowed.

So . . . I'm interested to hear from some of the outboard driven dinghy owners. How/where do you stow your outboard aboard the mother ship?
 

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Am dealing with same issue as I decide whether to buy a similar
sized gas outboard or a trolling motor for my inflatable. In any case I will store in lazarette as I like keeping above decks as uncluttered
as possible and don't want to keep outboard in plain sight.
A little easier for me to store on a 30fter.
If you have to go to storing under quarterberth consider selling
outboard and check out a trolling motor and battery with a small solar panel to recharge.
 

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We bought a Seateak outboard mounting bracket last year to hang the outboard off our stern pulpit. We have a 24' Bristol and the outboard for the dink is a 3.5 hp Tohatsu. Not much lighter than your outboard. It held just fine when we sailed to Block in September.
 

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I keep it on the back rail. I've been going in the other direction though, rowing more and using the outboard less. My outboard is a ~30lb Honda 2hp.

I don't like the idea of keeping it in a lazarette. On most boats the lazarette is open to the cabin and so if gasoline spilled you will get the gasoline smell inside your boat (or worse). The back rail is pretty out of the way.
 

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When you get the strong smell of gasoline, odds are the fuel/air mix is pretty good and only needs a spark. The rail is the only acceptable place IMO.

On a related issue, I spent my youth as the inflation/deflation boy aboard my parent's boat. For cruising, that's a real pain. I would consider something you could tow, even if you remove the motor. Deflate and store if sea conditions warrant.
 
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Walk the docks at a marina and you will see several solutions. You can make a stern rail mount with a piece of 2x8 lumber and properly sized stainless U-bolts to clamp it to the pushpit across the top and middle horizontal rails.
 

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Ours is on the stern pulpit next to the mast that supports our wind generator. We attached an Edson motor hoist to the pole and it works great for our Mecury 6 hp
 

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Hey, I have the same boat -- Seafarer 26. Personally, I might hesitate to put 45 pounds on that stern rail on a continuous basis, but I do think you'll probably be fine. The rail is attached at two points, stern and side, and they are pretty bulletproof connections, even on our 30+ year old boat. That rail has been hefting swimmers out of the water for almost as long as I've been alive without any sign of failing as far as I can see.

 

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I think that several of you have too much dinghy and too much engine for your sailboats.

If you have a 25-ish foot boat, then you should either have a 2hp motor and a 6 to 8 foot dinghy. Larger boats have the rail hardware and stowage to accommodate larger dinghies and their engines.

I have a 30 foot boat, and I stow a deflated, 8 foot Avon Redcrest in the quarterberth, and a 30lb. thrust, electric trolling motor on the rail. The trolling motor probably weighs 15lbs. and I don't have to store gasoline for it.

The trolling motor pushes the dinghy quite well against winds up to 20kts.
While anchored about 400 yards from a public dinghy dock, I made several trips to and fro, throughout the weekend and didn't put much of a dent in the battery's charge.
 

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Well, that's, uh, a rather personal question. ;-)

The term used to be more prevalent than it is nowadays. The popular dinghies back in the day were the Dyer Dhow, and the Dyer Dink. The latter had less freeboard so it could fit upside-down on the cabin top and under the boom. And with less freeboard it was row-only, while the Dhow was generally dragged astern and had an available sailing rig which was great fun for evening races in whatever harbor, since many cruisers (at least up East where I was then) had them.
 

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I also sail on a Seafarer 26. I would think the stern rail would be more than ample to hold a 45 pound outboard. That rail seems pretty bulletproof. When the boat is on the hard I always sneak in under the rail and much of my weight goes on stern pulpit and it's never seemed to budge. (Mast down on the trailer it's the easiest way in!). I don't really ever tow the dink as I primarily day sail. When I'm going away for a few nights I've always thrown kayaks up on the deck which provides me some peace of mind over dragging it behind me.

This all being said, I don't personally like the looks of an outboard on the stern pulpit. But that's is just my opinion.
 

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I think that several of you have too much dinghy and too much engine for your sailboats.

If you have a 25-ish foot boat, then you should either have a 2hp motor and a 6 to 8 foot dinghy. Larger boats have the rail hardware and stowage to accommodate larger dinghies and their engines.

I have a 30 foot boat, and I stow a deflated, 8 foot Avon Redcrest in the quarterberth, and a 30lb. thrust, electric trolling motor on the rail. The trolling motor probably weighs 15lbs. and I don't have to store gasoline for it.

The trolling motor pushes the dinghy quite well against winds up to 20kts.
While anchored about 400 yards from a public dinghy dock, I made several trips to and fro, throughout the weekend and didn't put much of a dent in the battery's charge.
I only row my dinghy, but that's not really relevant to the question, is it?

The OP said he already bought the dinghy and 45 pound motor. The question is, now what?
 

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On day sails we either leave the dinghy at the dock or on davits with the engine on. When we head offshore, the engine goes in a lazerette only because we don't have room on the rail itself and it’s easier than hanging from the davits themselves. We use an external fuel tank and we just disconnect it and run the engine dry (usually the prior day) before storing it.

If the rail had the room, that would be my first choice thou.
 

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A dissenting voice chimes in :p

I think that several of you have too much dinghy and too much engine for your sailboats.

If you have a 25-ish foot boat, then you should either have a 2hp motor and a 6 to 8 foot dinghy. Larger boats have the rail hardware and stowage to accommodate larger dinghies and their engines.

I have a 30 foot boat, and I stow a deflated, 8 foot Avon Redcrest in the quarterberth, and a 30lb. thrust, electric trolling motor on the rail. The trolling motor probably weighs 15lbs. and I don't have to store gasoline for it.

The trolling motor pushes the dinghy quite well against winds up to 20kts.
While anchored about 400 yards from a public dinghy dock, I made several trips to and fro, throughout the weekend and didn't put much of a dent in the battery's charge.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Thanks for all the input, it's appreciated.

I'm likely splashing next week as are most others here abouts so it's a little early to walk the docks to see how others have handled this.

I might be inclined to agree regarding the "too much motor, too small dinghy" line of reasoning but pickings are mighty slim with regard to affordable (read used, cheap) outboards around here. Idealy i was looking for a 3-4hp but the two I saw in three months of looking would have made better anchors than propulsion. The Mariner 5hp weighs the same as the 4 and it was a very reasonable $475 for a 1993 motor. The dink (a 2011 left over Bombard) is 7'10" and has a motor weight limit of 55lbs. True the motor is on the high side of the weight limit but it's still lighter than an electric AND a battery.

My Seafarer has the same stern rails as the one posted here but it has two horizontal rails instead of one. I'd thought I might be able to put a plank motor mount on the middle rail but there's not enough room between them to fit the engine cover. It IS pretty sturdy but, again, 45lbs is a substantial amount of weight to hang off the top rail, long term. Additionally, it seems to me to just cry out, "take me, take me" having the motor hanging out there.

I also run the outboard out of fuel everytime ( PITA that dping so is) but still seem to end up with gas on my hands after handling it. This makes me nervous about storing it in either the cockpit lazerettes or under the quarterberth.

I may end up looking for a used outboard motor bracket that can be mounted to the transom. It's possible this may solve the issue. A side benefit would be that, if properly mounted, even a short-shaft would have enough purchase to drive the boat in the event of a main engine failure.

John
 
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