SailNet Community banner

21 - 40 of 44 Posts

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,370 Posts
Today was a great day on the water on the Inter-coastal and out on the Gulf of Mexico. We had about 50 boats out today despite the spotty scattered showers that popped up every now and then. Clearwater Beach and Sand Key were bustling with skate boards, joggers, picnickers, beach goers, swimmers, wind surfers, kayaks, Hobie's/Beach Cats, Opti's, 420's, SunFish, Sports Fishermen and the Sailing Centers were really hopping with families enjoying Summer Vacation together.
Sounds like an ad for Fla real estate.
As for hurricanes in California, usually, only the remnants of tropical cyclones affect California. Since 1900, (118 years) only two tropical storms have hit California, one by direct landfall from offshore, another after making landfall in Mexico.
Whereas one year fairly recently, Fla had 5 direct strikes, and most years at least one makes landfall somewhere in the state.
If you are going to try to instill fear of living in California, perhaps earthquakes would be a better angle.
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,480 Posts
Hell NO! You sweat your head off the moment you step outside and worry about hurricanes full time.

We get the hell out of FL from July to September. Favourite places are Newport Beach, CA, Marina Del Rey, Ca and San Fco Bay. SAn Francisco is great a huge sailing area in protected waters, Temp in low to hight 60's year around and lots of party places new. You can actually go up the rives quite far to new areas.

Caribbean is great from February to end o May.

:2 boat:
Do you live in Florida but escape to the opposite coast when it gets to hot? Do you keep boats on both coasts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,669 Posts
What's not to like about Florida in the summer!? The oppressive heat and humidity keeps the snowbirds away!
Phil, anyone that has lived in the Mid-Atlantic Region, particularly Maryland, can easily tolerate Florida's summers. During the past two weeks, it has been at least 10 degrees cooler in the Florida Keys than it has been in Baltimore. I have a friend that lives in Stuart and he said please don't tell anyone about our summer weather - we want to keep it a secret.

I was stationed in Key West for three months while in the US Navy and the weather was always better than it was at home in Maryland, much less humidity and usually quite a bit cooler.

Gary :2 boat:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
It's rare in SoCal for storms to landfall pretty much year round (especially compared to Florida) and SoCal storms are nothing like Florida storms. We joke here all the time (those of us who have actually been in storms in places like Florida or other parts of the south) about how the lightning in Florida is amazing and beautiful...while here in SoCal, you can miss it even if you are looking right at it. Its usually just like a spark. There is a reason why they say it never rains in Southern California. Unlike Florida.

However, storms at sea are strong enough to be a problem because the Pacific is wide enough to develop a significant swell and a strong offshore wind towards a leeshore which in many parts of the California coast are rocky beaches/cliffs. Nothing particular noteworthy compared to other dangerous coasts, but it can be a serious problem for those new to the area. Especially when adding the surprise factor because our weather is otherwise so nice. A daysailer does not want to be caught out in that...and the winter/early spring is the most likely time for us to receive these types of storms. Most daysailers don't sail much in winter here except on a rare warm day. Wind cuts out early in winter too, even before sundown at times.

Not sure if it would be better here than in certain parts of Florida. Might not sail much here unless you are in an offshore boat and/or don't mind motoring.

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
When it comes to sailing in Florida it's really important to consider which part of Florida as coasts vary significantly with regards to wind, comfort (weatherwise), and opportunities for sailing.

I don't know as much as others here in this regard as I've done little of that there and can not give specific information on it, but I would advise to consider many areas for all the factors that OP is concerned about to determine which specific area would be the best fit for them...

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
555 Posts
Tampa St. Pete area will tick most of the buttons as will some spots on the right wrong coast of Florida but if I were a young whipper snapper of 31 ( I have socks older than that) with a tech career I think I would pick the San Francisco Bay Area. The winters are lovely but the summers not so much. I think it was Mark Twain that said the coldest place he had ever been was San Francisco in the summer. I hope we find out what he does.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Do you live in Florida but escape to the opposite coast when it gets to hot? Do you keep boats on both coasts?
I moved to FL from Los Angeles, Ca. I had a cal 30 in CA and sailed ocean :2 boat: or should I say motored during morning and sailed in afternoon. There are no hurricanes of note in CA. But they do have Santa Ana winds for about 90MPH. There are many sailboat races down to Mexico. When it comes to earthquakes all we asked for was a fair shake. Nothing big. They are so common that after a while you don't think about them.

In FL I had a Potter 19 :cut_out_animated_em that I sold to get an American SAil 14.6. I sold the AS14.6 and got a C165K.

The wind in SOFLO is between 5 and 20. The weather forecasting is usually wrong. The media drives you crazy in hurricane season (june to November) and yes there have been hurricanes in November. The media starts telling you that the hurricane 1500 miles away is headed for your roof and out to kill you if you don't evacuate early. You can count on 2 or 3 hurricanes crossing or running up FL every year. Hurricanes are a necessary evil because they are natures way of keeping the temp low and run according to ocean temps. The local news media is enough to make you want to move to the desert in Saudi Arabia. :svoilier:

If they cannot tell for sure if it's going to rain the next day how can they say we are going to drown in 100 years? That is quite a stretch. in Business we call 10 yr forecasts a guide or wishful thinking. A 50 year forecast is an inner rectum extraction.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
Sounds like an ad for Fla real estate.
As for hurricanes in California, usually, only the remnants of tropical cyclones affect California. Since 1900, (118 years) only two tropical storms have hit California, one by direct landfall from offshore, another after making landfall in Mexico.
Whereas one year fairly recently, Fla had 5 direct strikes, and most years at least one makes landfall somewhere in the state.
If you are going to try to instill fear of living in California, perhaps earthquakes would be a better angle.
My relatives in California are more often affected by the combined effects of mudslides, forest fires and earthquakes along with tidal surges which I previously mentioned than the chances of a hurricane making a direct hit here where I live (yes it could happen and some say we're overdue). I considered the entire package. Oh I left out rock slides too and homes that come off their foundations and slide down a hillside taking out all the homes beneath them in parts of California even without an earthquake.

The hyperbole about constant worry of hurricanes was the main point of that post since its again only a 6 month per year window in the Atlantic Basin overall with most tropical storms that hit close enough to impact the St Pete area with their outer bands milder than the typical Nor Easters that hit the New England area with greater regularity. Yes the news media may publish higher wind speeds then we see here because they take them at Tampa Airport and other more exposed areas however those are much greater that we actually see in built up areas. Many Atlantic hurricanes hit the Mid Atlantic coast and head North with Cape Hatteras being ground zero much of the time so its not just Florida.

My sister moved to the Carolina's from the St Pete area to escape the perceived threat of hurricanes and found she had jumped from the frying pan into the fire. She moved back after a few years and is enjoying the simpler wardrobe and not having to deal with what one would consider the moderately cold winters in North Carolina. Her older husbands health unfortunately took a hit from dealing with the winters there and he is still suffering from the aftereffects.

I also see a number of folks coming into the St Pete area from California because they could not take it any more between the natural and man made disasters and such along with the absurd cost of living.

Remember though that I am not talking about the Glades, Homestead, Punta Gorda, Pan Handle or other parts of the State of Florida with more severe weather known to get the bulk of the "Direct Hits" but just the Pinellas County Peninsula in the area of Clearwater/St Pete. Personally I live in a built up non-evacuation zone know as the Highlands that was constructed in the 1940's. Plenty of buffer zone all around to take the brunt of any storms plus I am at a higher elevation than most of the City of Tampa.

Like I have mentioned a number of times you have to choose wisely.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
My relatives in California are more often affected by the combined effects of mudslides, forest fires and earthquakes along with tidal surges which I previously mentioned than the chances of a hurricane making a direct hit here where I live (yes it could happen and some say we're overdue). I considered the entire package. Oh I left out rock slides too and homes that come off their foundations and slide down a hillside taking out all the homes beneath them in parts of California even without an earthquake.

The hyperbole about constant worry of hurricanes was the main point of that post since its again only a 6 month per year window in the Atlantic Basin overall with most tropical storms that hit close enough to impact the St Pete area with their outer bands milder than the typical Nor Easters that hit the New England area with greater regularity. Yes the news media may publish higher wind speeds then we see here because they take them at Tampa Airport and other more exposed areas however those are much greater that we actually see in built up areas. Many Atlantic hurricanes hit the Mid Atlantic coast and head North with Cape Hatteras being ground zero much of the time so its not just Florida.

My sister moved to the Carolina's from the St Pete area to escape the perceived threat of hurricanes and found she had jumped from the frying pan into the fire. She moved back after a few years and is enjoying the simpler wardrobe and not having to deal with what one would consider the moderately cold winters in North Carolina. Her older husbands health unfortunately took a hit from dealing with the winters there and he is still suffering from the aftereffects.

I also see a number of folks coming into the St Pete area from California because they could not take it any more between the natural and man made disasters and such along with the absurd cost of living.

Remember though that I am not talking about the Glades, Homestead, Punta Gorda, Pan Handle or other parts of the State of Florida with more severe weather known to get the bulk of the "Direct Hits" but just the Pinellas County Peninsula in the area of Clearwater/St Pete. Personally I live in a built up non-evacuation zone know as the Highlands that was constructed in the 1940's. Plenty of buffer zone all around to take the brunt of any storms plus I am at a higher elevation than most of the City of Tampa.

Like I have mentioned a number of times you have to choose wisely.

Your relatives in California are a significant minority. 98% of Southern Californians are absolutely not worried about mudslides. Those who are worried about it, have chosen to be worried about it since mudslides are only a problem on certain hillsides with a certain geology. If you are worried about a mudslide you either live on such hillside or right below it, but this is not typical for Californians and especially not for one who will be living on a boat.

Same for forest fires, although the number of people worried about it may be a bit higher. While we do have forest fires on occassion, they typically happen in the forest areas where the population is pretty low and forest fires are much more likely to occur in the summer months when it is hot and dry, not in the winter months. However again, this shouldn't even be a thought for someone who will be living on a boat, particularly in any of the marinas previously mentioned.

When we do have earthquakes, they are typically well inland so if you are on a boat, it is not really a concern. Tidal waves (tsunamis) are extremely rare and typically occur so far away that by the time they reach our coast, the prevailing winds/currents, intermittent offshore weather, and squalls that it would encounter on the way will have reduced them to a mere caution mainly for those at sea, not in the marina.

I won't talk about the number of Florida plates I see here regularly...yet when I drove to Florida and stayed visiting for nearly 3 weeks, I think I saw only 1 maybe 2 California plates.

I've lived in Florida for a few months and while I personally liked the storms there and the weather is probably second only to California nationwide. Even though we had one hurricane scare and it did hit us but we missed the brunt of it while in Florida. Yet to be honest I am not even counting that...personally I liked how Florida got more rain and beautiful thunderstorms so I'm probably a little biased towards Florida a bit, yet still overall I'd say California gets better weather.

The only reason why I said that OP might prefer Florida is because I think in the winter months that Florida (certain parts of it anyway) will have more opportunities for sailing. I do not at all believe however that Florida has better weather than we do...in any season. In summer months, I think California has hands down better day sailing and for year round living, I'd rather be here.

I sure do miss the awesome thunderstorms though...


Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
136 Posts
The question I would be asking myself here is: what kind of sailing do I want to do? If all you want is to go day sailing from your marina, California may work for you. If you are interested in cruising and exploring Florida is probably a better bet.

Since female companionship is one of your significant criteria, I want to share one other observation with you. Since I started living aboard I have had a variety of reactions ranging from wow, that is really cool to: oh, so your basically homeless. You may find that your status as a live aboard may not have a positive impact on your dating prospects.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,063 Posts
I think the OP was looking for a place to liveaboard where he can go sailing in winter, while being near a city with women around his age. He is not looking to retire to Thailand or the Med.
A few decades ago when I spent a lot of time in English harbor... quite a lovely place... with excellent marine services support... there were many large charter boats which worked from there and of course were crewed by young female stewards in the age range sought by the OP. I suppose this could be a source for dates. My experience was that the social scene for a young sailor was limited in the entire eastern caribbean unless you found some expats working down there at resorts and so on. Best bet for that might be st Marten or the French Islands or the VIs

I suppose things have changed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
... Those who are worried about it, have chosen to be worried about it since mudslides are only a problem on certain hillsides with a certain geology. If you are worried about a mudslide you either live on such hillside or right below it...

While we do have forest fires on occassion, they typically happen in the forest areas where the population is pretty low and forest fires are much more likely to occur in the summer months when it is hot and dry...
Same thing about climate and problem areas in Florida so you've gotten closer to the point. Its a big place at almost 500 miles North to South along with 1,350 miles of coastline so you have to choose wisely and not head to a known problem area. To blanket the whole of either State as the same is a bit off.

I live here full time and know how many times I see a California plate or speak with a tourist from California driving a local rental car with a Florida plate on it. Yes its a two way street however plenty of Californians visiting here on a regular cadence.

My relatives in California live in San Diego, San Fransisco, San Marcos and a few other places and they ended up there in order to keep their jobs which is why they are scattered about. Most of them plan to retire in the Clearwater/St. Pete area in order to stretch out their retirement funds.

I had to get out of the North due to a crippling injury that made living through New England falls/winters/springs with their constant barometric changes very extremely difficult and my choices were San Diego or Clearwater and the cost of living was the deciding factor. I came here thinking "Oh boy how will I survive the oppressive heat everybody is talking about" and after a few years realized that it was mostly hype and things were not as bad here in Clearwater/St. Pete as the extremely vocal minority would lead you to believe. Not having to be on narcotic pain killers most of the year is a blessing plus the added perks of being able to do my own yard work, do my own home repairs, ride a motorcycle, sail along with engage in other outdoor activities year round are priceless. If I had listened to the vocal minority I'd still be on narcotics for pain and likely be a wheelchair bound shut-in now as the doctors predicted would have been the case since 1995.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
Same thing about climate and problem areas in Florida so you've gotten closer to the point. Its a big place at almost 500 miles North to South along with 1,350 miles of coastline so you have to choose wisely and not head to a known problem area. To blanket the whole of either State as the same is a bit off.

I live here full time and know how many times I see a California plate or speak with a tourist from California driving a local rental car with a Florida plate on it. Yes its a two way street however plenty of Californians visiting here on a regular cadence.

My relatives in California live in San Diego, San Fransisco, San Marcos and a few other places and they ended up there in order to keep their jobs which is why they are scattered about. Most of them plan to retire in the Clearwater/St. Pete area in order to stretch out their retirement funds.

I had to get out of the North due to a crippling injury that made living through New England falls/winters/springs with their constant barometric changes very extremely difficult and my choices were San Diego or Clearwater and the cost of living was the deciding factor. I came here thinking "Oh boy how will I survive the oppressive heat everybody is talking about" and after a few years realized that it was mostly hype and things were not as bad here in Clearwater/St. Pete as the extremely vocal minority would lead you to believe. Not having to be on narcotic pain killers most of the year is a blessing plus the added perks of being able to do my own yard work, do my own home repairs, ride a motorcycle, sail along with engage in other outdoor activities year round are priceless. If I had listened to the vocal minority I'd still be on narcotics for pain and likely be a wheelchair bound shut-in now as the doctors predicted would have been the case since 1995.
I'm not necessarily disagreeing with you here except that mudslides and forest fires are not so much a climate issue in SoCal but a location issue because they only occur in certain areas. Secondly, most people living here do not live in those areas. Last but not least, for this topic it's not a concern at all because OP wants to live on a boat in a marina where neither of those have any chance of occuring.

Sent from my LG-H918 using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
Joined
·
2,480 Posts
There are plenty of reasons to be afraid to live in California, earthquakes is not a reasonable one, as long as you don't live in Santa Barbara mud slides is not one either. Growing up in California I have felt maybe 4 or 5, the last one I rolled over and went back to sleep. The last two big California quakes happened last Century and killed under 130 people, Katrina killed 1800. I would guess close to as many people died in Hurricanes last year on the East Coast as died in California Quakes since 1906.

The cost of hurricanes, tropical storms, false alarms add up and subtract from the quality of life in Hurricane Country. If you have only lived in the South East you can consider it all an inconvenience but those who have survived a storm, lost a home or lost a boat, look at incoming storm tracks differently. You can live your entire life in California without being affected by an earthquake. Depending on where you live on the East Coast, you will be affected by Hurricanes at some point in your life, sometimes every 5 years or so.

The true reasons not to live in California: Fires, Cost, Taxes, Traffic, People (lots of them).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,021 Posts
So anyways, I'm looking for 3 main criteria:
1) Warm weather obviously

2) Cool places to weekend sail to, or places where I can cruise to and still work during the day with access to internet and electricity

3) Fun area surrounding the home base marina/mooring/whatever
For #3 (fun land-based area), personally I'd narrow down to some potential locations and then buy a couple plane tickets and go for a mini-vaca to check them out. We did that when evaluating a few relocation opportunities in our 20s, and nothing can substitute for actually being in a place for a weekend and just seeing how it feels.

For #2, personally I don't see a lot of the FL coast and So Cal as being great weekend cruising areas. There's not really anywhere to go (with maybe the exception of the FL keys and Catalina). I have spent time in Tampa/Bradenton area, and the weather can be great, there are some beautiful beaches, and some great daysailing conditions, but if you want to head out for a 2-3 day cruise, the options aren't that appealing to me. I think I'd get bored pretty quickly living on a cruising sailboat in that area.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
For #3 (fun land-based area), personally I'd narrow down to some potential locations and then buy a couple plane tickets and go for a mini-vaca to check them out. We did that when evaluating a few relocation opportunities in our 20s, and nothing can substitute for actually being in a place for a weekend and just seeing how it feels.

For #2, personally I don't see a lot of the FL coast and So Cal as being great weekend cruising areas. There's not really anywhere to go (with maybe the exception of the FL keys and Catalina). I have spent time in Tampa/Bradenton area, and the weather can be great, there are some beautiful beaches, and some great daysailing conditions, but if you want to head out for a 2-3 day cruise, the options aren't that appealing to me. I think I'd get bored pretty quickly living on a cruising sailboat in that area.
A lot depends on your definition of a cool (interesting) place I suppose. To me its the normal everyday people and history of the area and not just a swanky club or glitzy tourist attraction.

There is a series of books called something along the lines of "One Tank Trips" that covers the area and there are an amazing amount of things to see and do in this area on or near to the Gulf or just a short drive inland. I have lived here almost 30 years now and have not scratched the surface.

A lot of history from the Spanish American War, Indian Wars, Spanish Occupation, British Occupation, WWII, WWI and Civil War here too.

One could also sail about and take on the Florida Maritime Heritage Trail which could take some years to do justice to. There are also county run Heritage Villages in many areas that showcase the founders of the area and how things progressed. At the local one they have opened a boathouse to highlight what Clark Mills, Morgan and McKay and others have done for the area and even hold workshops where you can build your own pram or dinghy. Sailing about the almost 1,400 miles of coastline to see and explore the old historic communities could take a lifetime too.

When you keep still for a few moments and really look at whats located close to where your standing things you never knew you never knew keep presenting themselves.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
My boat is in Marina Del Rey and I can fill you in on these:

1) Warm weather obviously
It's always around 72F during the day here, which is cool for me (I reside in Nevada), but it's perfect 'shorts and flip flops' weather. It's a little cooler in the winter, as was stated earlier in the thread. Also a little wet. LOL about mudslides- talk about thread drift....

2) Cool places to weekend sail to, or places where I can cruise to and still work during the day with access to internet and electricity
Also mentioned was Catalina, which is great year round, as are Channel Islands, though I can't vouch for the connectivity therein. The wind doesn't pick up until just after 11am and turns off like a faucet around 8pm. The wind is always fair, rarely over 12kt and swells vary from 2-3 to 4-5' regularly. The forecast is always pretty close. If you like yacht clubs, you can hop down the coast and use free slips for three days at most of them if you are a member that has reciprocals.

3) Fun area surrounding the home base marina/mooring/whatever
There is a path that runs from Redondo Beach, North through several beach communities, past my dock and many others in MDR and continues to Santa Monica. I routinely bike or run in either direction, depending on mood. There are more bars/restaurants around here than I can frequent. I have my favorites and the selection ranges from dive to super trendy within a stones throw. Lots of young professionals here, as West LA is basically an industry town (Movies/TV/Tech). Don't bring your car. Currently there are several basins under construction (dock replacement) and there will be an abundance of available slips soon. Prices are roughly $12'/month non-liveaboard. Add 50% for liveaboard.
Hope that helps!
 

·
Old as Dirt!
Joined
·
3,483 Posts
Coming from California, originally San Francisco and later Newport Beach, but now having lived in southwest Florida for 25 years or so, in my view there is no comparison and particularly in the winter months. In SoCal we had few places to cruise to save Catalina and the Channel Islands and, frankly, one can only do so many trips to Two Harbors or Cat Harbor before the charm wears off. Moreover, the ocean is very cold at all times of year in California so swimming, absent a wet-suit, isn't very enjoyable and, virtually wherever one chooses to go, it is crowded. Avalon is packed like a Sardine Can most weekends with boats less than 10 feet apart often times. For cruising the SF Bay area is somewhat better but colder than shadoodle most of the year unless one gets up to Suisun Bay where the water is a thin as is that in SW Florida but still freezing cold most of the year.

To each his/her own but, if it were my choice, the southwest coast of Florida would fit the bill nicely.

FWIW...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7 Posts
Keys are great but crowded in winter. SouthWest Florida from Sarasota on down to Marco is less crowded. Good marinas, anchorages, friendly folks. Ft. Myers would be better for someone younger. Marco and Naples is older crowd. Good anchorage and moorings in Ft. Myers. Lots of nightlife. And you can sail to Cabbage Key (north) or south to Lover's Key.
If you get down to Naples, I would visit but then head south to Johnson Bay, Isles of Capri. Pelican Bend has a good anchorage nearby. Marco River has good anchorages. South to Cape Romano is nice place for solitude and to take a friend for an overnight.

Buc210
S/V Into the Mystic
Johnson Bay, Isles of Capri
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,129 Posts
When wintering in Florida on a boat you will sometimes need more than a pedal bicycle or skate board to run errands around town but still not need to get on the Interstate however renting even a scooter can be a hassle and expensive over the long haul.

In Lantana Florida is the US Distributor for Di Blasi who makes a folding 50cc motorbike that some cruisers along with flyers carry with them since they fold up rather compactly, don't weigh very much but are street legal and great for exploring the local area without having to arrange for a rental car plus they get about 130 mpg Di Blasi has been in business for around 45 years now so they are not new at this. Much of the area around the Marinas in Clearwater/St Pete for example are 20 to 30 mph speed zones making these very practical.


Folded:
Length............................................................29 1/2"
Height...................................................................23"
Width..............................................................12 1/2"
Weight (empty)................................................64 lbs.
Storage Displacement..............less than 5 cubic feet.



If I understand correctly they also make a few electric models too.

Some companies use them to provide designated drivers (for folks that have had a few drinks and don't want to chance a DUI) who ride out to where you are located, fold the bike up in its bag placing it in the trunk of your vehicle and then drive you and your vehicle home for you so you won't be guilty of driving impaired. Once they get you home they unfold the bike, fold up the bag and are off to their next pickup and your vehicle is not left out in a parking lot where it can more likely get vandalized or stolen but is safely in your own driveway or garage.
 
21 - 40 of 44 Posts
Top