SailNet Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I was thinking about purchasing a portable ice maker for the boat, but after doing a bit of research, I am discovering that they don't work with distilled or pure water - which I would think would be the same water that my water maker will eventually make (I am still working on it.)

So, am I correct in my assumption? and if so, is there a portable ice maker on the market (12 volt or 110 volt, doesn't matter) that will work with a water maker without having to see if adding a little salt to the water will cause the ice maker to sense it - would prefer not to have to add salt just to see if my purchase will work correctly.

Thanks for any and all input and replies.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
At my last job I ran and maintained 2 RO systems. One for the peoples house and one for their 80 foot yacht. this was the only water supply for both. They have several ice makers that work fine.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,770 Posts
RO water makers do not produce distilled water. Only evaporator water makers produce distilled water, and I think it's highly unlikely you will have one of those, on a yacht under 100 feet.
So you can use any kind of ice maker you choose. However, be aware that most cheap ice makers do not have refrigeration; they only produce ice, they cannot store it, a very important thing to consider.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
48 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Thanks for the replies, I was unsure of exactly what kind of output a RO water maker puts out. But am I also incorrect that these type units can't store the ice they produce?

This one at Walmart:

Magic Chef Portable Ice Maker, MCIM22TW - Walmart.com

clearly states it can store ice also:

"The MCIM22TW Magic Chef Portable Ice Maker provides you with 27 lbs in 24 hours and also can store nearly 4 lbs comfortably in its detachable storage basket."

But I'm glad I can at least consider these units without having to worry about adding salt to a gallon of water.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,067 Posts
Impurities in water LOWER the temperature value at which the water freezes. Therefore the 'purer' the water the easier it is and less energy required to freeze it (relatively speaking). Called: freezing point depression.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
8,770 Posts
clearly states it can store ice also:

"The MCIM22TW Magic Chef Portable Ice Maker provides you with 27 lbs in 24 hours and also can store nearly 4 lbs comfortably in its detachable storage basket."
.
OK, I misspoke. They can store it, as in there is a place it can stay, but it is NOT a refrigerated space, so in a short time if it is warm, you will be "storing" water.
 

·
██▓▓▒▒░&
Joined
·
13,645 Posts
"Impurities in water LOWER the temperature value at which the water freezes. "
Article in WIRED.com today says the exact opposite, that pure water won't form ice until -36F and it is only the impurities, typically organic material, that "collect" ice at the molecular level and allow it to accumulate and form up at temps to 32F.

Total news to me, but they swear that 100% pure pristine water molecules want to stay fluid until -36F.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,067 Posts
Probably correct as you need microscopic nucleation sites (teeny solid impurities) for the crystals to 'start' their formation, same with raindrops, etc. :)
 

·
Mermaid Hunter
Joined
·
5,689 Posts
Article in WIRED.com today says the exact opposite, that pure water won't form ice until -36F and it is only the impurities, typically organic material, that "collect" ice at the molecular level and allow it to accumulate and form up at temps to 32F.
The article is about formation high in the atmosphere. What is the impact of ambient pressure?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
22,713 Posts
?....after doing a bit of research, I am discovering that they don't work with distilled or pure water.....
Are you reading an instruction to add tap water, or a prohibition on distilled?

Distilled water tastes lousy, it's the minerals in water that taste fresh, but it certainly freezes.

....which I would think would be the same water that my water maker will eventually make.....
If you think about it, water makers are really only desalinators, they don't actually make water. All they to is filter out salt and other dissolved solids of their size. Anything smaller will remain, albeit, not much.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
847 Posts
----

Distilled water tastes lousy, it's the minerals in water that taste fresh, but it certainly freezes.

If you think about it, water makers are really only desalinators, they don't actually make water. All they to is filter out salt and other dissolved solids of their size. Anything smaller will remain, albeit, not much.
Which is why taking mineral/trace element supplements is a good idea if your drinking water is RO sourced.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
220 Posts
Something else interesting about RO water compared to Distilled. The Ph of RO is 4 and the Ph of distilled is 6. Neutral Ph is 7.3. The Big RO machine I was running (7 GPM) had dissolved solids of around 60 Parts Per Million. So as you can see RO water is quite acidic.
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top