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Discussion Starter #1
Another battery question:

I have flooded lead-acid batteries, so-called "Marine" dual-use (starter + deep-cyle) type (current generation is from Costco). For 99% of the time they are being charged entirely by solar. However, I do have a ProNautic P series battery charger installed and I occasionally use it, when I do have a land power connection.

Now this is definitely not a life-or-death question but I since I have the fancy charger, I want to use it right. It has 2 Profiles for flooded batteries (plus profiles for all kinds of other battery chemistries). They are as follows:

Profile 1: 14.8 VDC 12.8-13.6 VDC
Profile 2: 14.7 VDC 12.8-13.4 VDC

where the first number is the 'Conditioning VDC' and the second is the 'Auto Maintain VDC Range'

The differences are not huge but which is the better one for my batteries? And what is the other profile for?

tx
 

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The right profile to use is determined by the battery manufacturer, but the Costco batteries probably don't have that information available. I'll take a stab at your question by guessing that the two profiles are for traction FLA and "regular" FLA. Traction batteries have thicker plates and more electrolyte needing stirring, so they generally use higher charge voltages.

However, the two profiles presented aren't really much different, and either could be used. I'd pick profile 2 for your batteries.

Mark
 

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Discussion Starter #3
The right profile to use is determined by the battery manufacturer, but the Costco batteries probably don't have that information available. I'll take a stab at your question by guessing that the two profiles are for traction FLA and "regular" FLA. Traction batteries have thicker plates and more electrolyte needing stirring, so they generally use higher charge voltages.

However, the two profiles presented aren't really much different, and either could be used. I'd pick profile 2 for your batteries.

Mark

Thank you. Next time I'll be at the boat I will see if I can find any details on the battery. I agree that these dual-purpose are likely not traction batteries.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
If they are open wet cells I would use #1
If sealed I would use #2
Thanks for the reply. But I believe that, although the labels say just "Flooded" for both of these profiles, they actually mean open flooded cells, for both. Reason is that there are two additional (separate) profiles for "Sealed" cells. Plus AGM, GEL, even Li and Ca have separate profiles. As I said, this is the fancy model (too bad I barely use it...)
 

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I am sure that is true. But if they are sealed maintenance free fla i would use the lower settings

That's my answer and they are your batteries. You know what to do.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
I am sure that is true. But if they are sealed maintenance free fla i would use the lower settings

That's my answer and they are your batteries. You know what to do.
I did not know that.

And now I DON'T know what to do! My batteries are not sealed so you say I should the higher setting. Marks says they are likely not track batteries (and I agree) so I should use the low setting. Hmm.

(much ado about 0.1V?)
 

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(much ado about 0.1V?)
That's pretty much it. There really isn't any practical difference between those two settings. I suspect the manufacturer included them because they were recommended charging profiles from two different popular batteries. I chose the lower settings only because I assumed that charger did not have a temperature sensor for voltage compensation and it is getting to be summer. Also, if they sit in float a lot, I'd prefer the slightly lower float voltage.

Flip a coin - there isn't enough daylight between them to make a difference.

One thing I would do is measure that the voltage on the battery terminals matches the voltage the charger thinks it is supplying. If you have voltage drop in the run, then use the higher profile to compensate (or fix that issue).

Mark
 

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bell ringer
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I did not know that.

And now I DON'T know what to do! My batteries are not sealed so you say I should the higher setting. Marks says they are likely not track batteries (and I agree) so I should use the low setting. Hmm.

(much ado about 0.1V?)
In the end the voltage probably matters little. Amps at absorption matter more.

I can not remember where, but i read once of the same voltage difference as asked about where it was the difference between an Australian standard and everyone else.

Just pick one.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
That's pretty much it. There really isn't any practical difference between those two settings. I suspect the manufacturer included them because they were recommended charging profiles from two different popular batteries. I chose the lower settings only because I assumed that charger did not have a temperature sensor for voltage compensation and it is getting to be summer. Also, if they sit in float a lot, I'd prefer the slightly lower float voltage.

Flip a coin - there isn't enough daylight between them to make a difference.

One thing I would do is measure that the voltage on the battery terminals matches the voltage the charger thinks it is supplying. If you have voltage drop in the run, then use the higher profile to compensate (or fix that issue).

Mark
There is a temperature sensor so that is covered.

But measuring the voltage that the batteries actually see is a good idea. I never did that for some reason. Since I am obsessing about a tenth of a volt I should do my due diligence there. Have to make sure I take my Fluke to the boat and not use the (free) HF VOM that lives on the boat, I am not convinced I trust it to 0.1V
 

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You charge batteries based on the manufacturers suggested absorption & float voltages. Forget about the words on the charger (Flooded, GEL, AGM) and select a charge profile that matches or very closely your battery makers voltage guidance.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
You charge batteries based on the manufacturers suggested absorption & float voltages. Forget about the words on the charger (Flooded, GEL, AGM) and select a charge profile that matches or very closely your battery makers voltage guidance.
I was hoping you would chime in!

As I said, the batteries are from Costco. Next time I am at the boat I will try to find out more about them. Perhaps I can identify the manufacturer.

Thanks!
 
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