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I just got a quote for new rigging.

The rigger suggested keeping the hardware and just replacing the wires. Does this make sense? Should we NDT the fittings first?
Looks like a lot of surface corrosion on everything- I would replace. Also, pull the chain plates and do a inspection using magnifying glass.
 

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I just got a quote for new rigging.

The rigger suggested keeping the hardware and just replacing the wires. Does this make sense? Should we NDT the fittings first?
Is the rigging quote for the Potter 14? that picture does not look like potter rigging. even so the corrosion in the pic is just on the surface and can be removed and passivated. the wire with a swage end is the component that should be changed at least every ten years. if you have reusable wire end fittings then only the wire
 

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You wrote
Well...the new standing rigging is just over a month old.
I went up the mast to do some electrical work and noticed corrosion on the forestay and backstay hardware. The cap shrouds which are about three feet lower look shiny and new as I would expect (last shot).
I know the forestay and backstay were changed, as I was given the old ones.
Thoughts?
Begs the question; Why only the two.
It's not clear if all standing rigging was replaced.

I wrote
Different dies?
What dimensions on shrouds and stays?
That's exactly what he said (without further explanation). Having never assembled rigging I have no idea what that means. I have enough to do, which is why I didn't do it myself in the first place. I'm starting to wish I had, given all the time I'm spending correcting his work! "He's not the cheapest, but he is the best" (I was told).

The wire is 1/4", she's a 30' sloop.
Dies must match the size of the terminal and terminals much match the wire. It's not uncommon to find different diameter wires on the same mast.
 

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Is the rigging quote for the Potter 14? that picture does not look like potter rigging. even so the corrosion in the pic is just on the surface and can be removed and passivated. the wire with a swage end is the component that should be changed at least every ten years. if you have reusable wire end fittings then only the wire
I have used the "Spotless Stainless" passivating solution on much of my stainless. This includes shroud swage fitting, chain plates, bow and stern railings, my Monitor Windvane (316 SS) and other fittings. I have also used the Wichard passivating paste.

Wichard - Wichinox Passivating Cleaner for Stainless Steel

I like the Whichard the best as you can also polish the stainless at the same time. What I find is that after a few months the corrosion is back- even on part that I know were well made like the Monitor. It seems to me, after a certain age, stainless starts corroding to the point it cannot be return to near original condition. Maybe microscopic pitting is occurring and passivation just does not last. I can get all my stainless to look new by polishing and waxing, but in a few weeks, corrosion begins. I do get a lot of salt build up due to near by breaking waves and sea spray. The other problem is that stainless can start corroding from the inside- once the passivating layer has been breached- one may get the part to look nice and shiny, but it has lost strength.
 

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If you've really got nothing better to do than troll threads and make snarky remarks, you have far too much time on your hands!
If you bothered to read the thread, you'd realize that the issue is brand new rigging corroding. Forgive me for being concerned.
Do you know what effect a little surface rust has on the strength of stainless steel? None at all.
 

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I would think that waxing stainless steel is a bad idea. The wax would create an oxygen barrier and promote crevice corrosion.
 

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I would think that waxing stainless steel is a bad idea. The wax would create an oxygen barrier and promote crevice corrosion.
I thought that too, then a friend gave me this:
Collinite Insulator Wax:
•Car, truck, boat, bike, RV, aircraft, personal watercraft, snowmobile, ATV, tractor/farm equipment, golf cart, snowplow.
•Exterior gel coat, fiberglass, clear coat, single stage and lacquer paints and highly finished wood.
•CLEAN, unblemished painted/unpainted metals; chrome, stainless steel, aluminum, copper, and brass
•NOT recommended for rubber, non-skid, black trim, vinyl, glass or non-painted plastic.


Insulator Wax » Collinite

I have used it and it does prolong the passiivating and polish of my stainless. I guess once stainless is passivated, creating a barrier to salt spray (which dries and leaves salt deposits) is a good thing. If one sails only in fresh water, or does not have a salt deposit problem, wax probably not needed.
 

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I have used it and it does prolong the passiivating and polish of my stainless. I guess once stainless is passivated, creating a barrier to salt spray (which dries and leaves salt deposits) is a good thing. If one sails only in fresh water, or does not have a salt deposit problem, wax probably not needed.
That's right.. To get crevice corrosion happening in the first place, the 'corrodant' (eg. salt water) has to be able to remain in continous contact with unprotected metal. If all cracks and crevices are sealed with wax, regardless of whether or not oxygen can get in, the salt can't get to it either and crevice corrosion doesn't happen. This is one reason products like Lanocote were developed.

EDIT: You might not have a salt deposit problem in fresh water, but depending on where you are you might have an acid rain/smog problem instead and a wax barrier would still be of help.
 
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