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The following is a short piece I wrote for a sailing rag a few years back.

My loving wife swears to me that size doesn’t matter. But does it? I was recently told that my boat is too small. Living in the boat yard I meet all types: boaters, builders, workers, and dreamers. We fall somewhere in between the lines. At a whopping 24 feet with a displacement of 6500lbs, by today’s standards our boat is considered small by any measure. I recently read an article titled Pocket Cruiser Of The Year. It was a 38-footer. I guess our boat is now considered a dinghy. There is 6’1” standing headroom and four berths. The shortest, our double, measures 6’5”. We have a full galley with a two-burner propane stove and oven. Even though we choose to use a cedar bucket we do have a very nice enclosed head which is small enough to be considered seaworthy but large enough to actually pull your pants down while inside. With two adults and two dogs this might sound small but it works for us. Because we are financially challenged there aren’t many boats in our price range to choose from. Even if we go up to 30’ we won’t get much more usable room. Having such a small boat we can get away with an outboard engine and no marine head. This leaves us with the usable space of a well-built 30-footer with no prop drag and lighter displacement. Being of a traditional design but built with modern building techniques and materials, our boat is incredibly strong but lighter and faster than she would appear. Sure we could sell our boat and put a nice down payment on a larger boat. Then in 20 years when it is payed off we could spend another three years rebuilding everything on it and sail away. I would be 62, she would be 50, and we would have a boat that is older than the one we currently own. By then we might not be quite as adventurous as we are now and may not be able to happily live without hot water, plumbing, full electronics, and all of the power it takes to run these luxuries. We can't support fancy electronics so we don't have them. Instead we have to be better sailors and navigators adding to the pleasure and satisfaction of cruising. Outfitting and refitting our boat cost less because marine equipment is basically priced by the pound, inch, or foot. We also purchase used equipment where we can. After all, once you use something it really isn't new anymore. Is it really worth paying more than double to have gear that is new for one use? With a very small initial investment we don't feel the need to carry insurance. Every part of our boat takes less time to maintain and is easier on the budget, leaving us more time to play which is what cruising is really all about.
 

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The following is a short piece I wrote for a sailing rag a few years back.

My loving wife swears to me that size doesn’t matter. But does it? I was recently told that my boat is too small. Living in the boat yard I meet all types: boaters, builders, workers, and dreamers. We fall somewhere in between the lines. At a whopping 24 feet with a displacement of 6500lbs, by today’s standards our boat is considered small by any measure. I recently read an article titled Pocket Cruiser Of The Year. It was a 38-footer. I guess our boat is now considered a dinghy. There is 6’1” standing headroom and four berths. The shortest, our double, measures 6’5”. We have a full galley with a two-burner propane stove and oven. Even though we choose to use a cedar bucket we do have a very nice enclosed head which is small enough to be considered seaworthy but large enough to actually pull your pants down while inside. With two adults and two dogs this might sound small but it works for us. Because we are financially challenged there aren’t many boats in our price range to choose from. Even if we go up to 30’ we won’t get much more usable room. Having such a small boat we can get away with an outboard engine and no marine head. This leaves us with the usable space of a well-built 30-footer with no prop drag and lighter displacement. Being of a traditional design but built with modern building techniques and materials, our boat is incredibly strong but lighter and faster than she would appear. Sure we could sell our boat and put a nice down payment on a larger boat. Then in 20 years when it is payed off we could spend another three years rebuilding everything on it and sail away. I would be 62, she would be 50, and we would have a boat that is older than the one we currently own. By then we might not be quite as adventurous as we are now and may not be able to happily live without hot water, plumbing, full electronics, and all of the power it takes to run these luxuries. We can't support fancy electronics so we don't have them. Instead we have to be better sailors and navigators adding to the pleasure and satisfaction of cruising. Outfitting and refitting our boat cost less because marine equipment is basically priced by the pound, inch, or foot. We also purchase used equipment where we can. After all, once you use something it really isn't new anymore. Is it really worth paying more than double to have gear that is new for one use? With a very small initial investment we don't feel the need to carry insurance. Every part of our boat takes less time to maintain and is easier on the budget, leaving us more time to play which is what cruising is really all about.
Barefoot,

WELL SAID!.... WELL SAID!!!

We would say about the same, except we are not financially challenged, NOT rich, BUT, we could afford a much larger boat than our Nor'Sea 27. We do have a marine head, a water maker, hot & cold pressure water, and most any toy a larger boat has, BUT we enjoy our stout small boat and would not trade her for any larger boat. There is just to much good to say about a small boat in place of larger ones.

I have sailed into some remote anchorages in big boats, big power boats and small boats. always feel welcome by the locals in our small boat (a BIG plus as far as we are concerned). When in a big boat, the locals almost always are stand offish.

Greg
 

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6500lbs is not a small boat! That is the same weight range (and thus sail area) as many 28-30' cruising boats.

It's great that you love the boat. I was expecting to read this thread and find someone doing long distance cruising on a WWP 19. That's a small cruiser.
 

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I just finished putting into the water a Flicka-20 which was started back in 1972. I have everything a 40foot boat has, Micro,Air Condition, Refer, Range snd so forth. I have had big boats and little ones are more fun, cheaper to dock and repair as well to single hand sail. I would stay with what you have and the Nortsea is a killer boat mentioned by one coment. The big trick is paying everything off and having a few bucks to cruise on. Don't wait till you are old to cruise, do it sooner not later. Start taking short trips and expand on that. After a short time you will put the dock lines in the locker, really! Small is good for dry docks, slips, shallow anchorages, repairs, insurance and under 25 feet a lot of taxes. Don't buckle to loans and much more expenses but just pay off you current debt and you will be saving for your cruising fund. You know the boat you presently own and can operate and live with it's confines easily. Stick with it and you will go places!
Have a Good One!
 

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Daniel - Norsea 27
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I don't have a lot of experience or time on larger boats. I do dream of someday getting a boat with a little more space. At 6'5", I could use that extra space. I've walked around on a few large boats in the 40+ft range but I feel my Nor'sea 27 is quite comfortable to me. I can lay down straight in my quarter-berths easily enough and there's more space when the table is dropped down and filler cushions are put in place. When I was searching for a boat, I had a couple people telling me to not bother looking at the NS27 because it would be too small for me. But when I saw this boat, it wasn't looking to great but I saw the potential in it. I decided to go for it and saved my boat from the PO and I'm happy I did. My boat may not be the fastest or biggest but I'm comfortable in my little cruiser and right now, I wouldn't trade or sell it for anything else. It has everything I need. :)
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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My boat is 23 feet.. I want to move up in a year or two.. to a 24 footer :D
 

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Freedom isn't free
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Maybe take baby steps... perhaps 23.5
 

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Daysailing is far more pleasurable in small boats I think. There is a certain size that is big enough to not worry about capsize and be able to make a cup of coffee down below, yet small enough to handle easily. Just about any 22-27' keelboat is about in that sweet spot.

I often feel more comfortable in my 25 footer than in my father's 32 footer, even in big air and swell. I am just more in control of my boat (I almost always sail short handed) than my father's at any given moment, and the loads are much more manageable making maneuvers fast and efficient.

Long distance though, when sail and boat handling is generally done in hourly increments, a dodger and some extra waterline make life better
 

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We got our first boat this past spring, a B24, basically 6000 lbs with 3000 under water :) it's a great boat, and like yours it's a grand pocket cruiser. Oh, and it's paid in full. :)
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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hard to get Hull insurance in NJ right now.. Couple of places I called around to said they will not insure for any boat kept in a "hurricane flood zone" which is like all but the Northwestern part of NJ
 

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I just sold my Catalina 309 (31 ft.) and replaced it with a Precision 23. No regrets. I find it much more fun to sail.

We're in a fairly big marina, here in Muskegon, MI, and it's probably the smallest sailboat in the marina. And, it probably leaves the dock more than any other boat in the marina.

Yeah, I had to give up the ability to sail up the coast for a few days or a couple weeks...not gonna rough it in a 23. But, Muskegon has a good sized inland lake with channel access to Lake Michigan, and considering 98 percent of my sailing time was daysailing anyway, we're talking major savings.

There's more than one way to get it done.
 

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......
and it's probably the smallest sailboat in the marina. And, it probably leaves the dock more than any other boat in the marina...
This is exactly my situation. We have a PY23 and leave the dock more than any other boat in the marina, except the other PY23!

The stink potters are amazed when we come down and hurry up to get out, instead of lounging around in the cockpit.

Love It!
 

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Just to inject a different perspective. I actually find daysailing my current Cal 33 easier than the ODay 22 I started with over 30 years ago. And I regularly go out on friend's boats that are smaller so I haven't lost my feel for smaller boats. Things like roller furling and self-tailing winches have leveled the playing field making larger boats much easier to sail.
 

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I like my 26 foot boat, although I probably wouldn't take it across the Atlantic (although it IS a MORC boat, so with a bit of modification and smart seamanship, it would probably do just fine). My only wish is that I were situated closer to a body of water where we could "go somewhere" rather than just sail in circles on our little lake. Fortunately, we DO have a trailer, so once I do a little engineering to make the mast easier (and less nerve racking..) to raise and lower with two people and make a few trailer modifications to make loading and unloading more fool proof, we will hopefully be taking it to that bigger water {Great Lakes} to get the experience!
 

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hard to get Hull insurance in NJ right now.. Couple of places I called around to said they will not insure for any boat kept in a "hurricane flood zone" which is like all but the Northwestern part of NJ
I live directly in the Sandy flood zone and had no problem insuring my boat for its value. Skisafe (from Geico) had the best rates.
 

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I have a Santana23 with a fixed keel I single hand with out any problem ...I can bungee the tiller walk on deck, or show a newbie how to trim sail.. ...I use a Honda 2 hp to get me in and out of my slip and wide open throttle I can get almost 6 knots out of it... the S23 is light and very easy to handle if I had a larger boat I most likely would not sail as much.... plus smaller boat smaller parts ..smaller sails smaller bills
 

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. I have everything a 40foot boat has, Micro,Air Condition, Refer, ...
most people don't publicly admit to having refer on their boats. :D nice boat, by the way. if I could have found one...
 
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