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In my little sailboat a MOB will have difficulty getting back in the boat because while I have ladder, the water up here is really cold. You got to figure that by the time I swing around, the MOB is going to be pretty cold.

So I'm going to have to put extend a mooring line over board from a cleat about 2/3 forward to the bow, and back to a winch in the Stern. The MOB grabs the edge of the deck(or another jack line) and steps on the mooring line(which has wide plastic tubing on in the center to make the step easier), and winch him/her up high enough to climb aboard.

Considering even a very heavy person's weight and buoyancy in water, how strong or big a winch will I need?
 

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Your assuming the mob will have the ability to climb up. Don't plan on it. Check Life Sling. You'll need to rig a block and tackle to a halyard.
Jim
 

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Estimate a 200# MOB and half again that in water weight; figger 300# total weight. a 4:1 block and perhaps a #6 or seven winch. That would make the load manageable.. Rig the blocks to the halyard, haul it up and cleat off. Run the free end to the winch and tie off/clip in the working line to the life sling (?) line. Find a winch and blocks (mebbe use exist main sheet set?) on E-Bay, get some quarter inch+ hi-test line and a sling.. Rig it ahead of time an try it out. .
Of course,thiis all assumestthat your existing hardware/rigging wwwilltaketthe. loads! :D
Are you*that* worriedabout a MOB situ?

HTH
 

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Do you tow an inflatable dinghy? If so, get the MOB into the dinghy first. If they are unconscious - it is a Mayday. If they are conscious warm them up in the dinghy until they get enough strength to reboard.
 

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Top Tip

It may be difficult to get an unresponsive person into an inflatable especially one with big tubes. It becomes much easier if you 3/4s deflate ONE section of the tubes.
 

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On that boat, you'd be far better off bringing a MOB over the transom rather than attempting to drag him over the side rails. BTDT...
 

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The system I put together for my boat, combines the Lifesling with a halyard, and the boom vang tackle.

Snap shackles allow quick disconnect from the mast/boom, and attachment to a halyard and the Lifesling. You can then use the vang for it's advantage to hoist an unresponsive body aboard.

The other option, is to simply connect the halyard to the Lifesling, and run the tail through a jib car, back to a primary winch, and winch the unresponsive body aboard.
 

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It's true, cold water disables you fast. I took a swim around a charter boat in Lake Superior in water around 50ºF. I did three laps around a 39' boat, so I swam maybe 150', and by the time I climbed out I was quite weak and had a bit of trouble getting my fingers to grip the swim ladder.

Over Memorial Day weekend I went for a "swim" in 34ºF water! I put "swim" in quotes because all I really did was climb down the swim ladder and duck my head under a couple times, I couldn't stay in long enough to actually swim or get weak. Water that cold does silly things to your head.

Anyway, I will have to think about this too. I have a 22-foot boat, no way could I use a halyard to pull 300 lbs out of the water, it'd just tip my boat over. I'm not sure if my boom could support that kind of load either.

New rule on my boat: Only skinny people are allowed to fall overboard!
 

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your in a tough situation...small boat sailing is different than big boat sailing

even if you do put in a winch the mast and conversely the wieght overboard will likely capsize you or severy heel you when dragging you up

I think the old rope ladder will be the most practical although not ideal way to get back on

btw I would disagree with what international marine said...they said should but sounds like a sales brochure
 

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"So I'm going to have to put extend a mooring line over board from a cleat about 2/3 forward to the bow, and back to a winch in the Stern. The MOB grabs the edge of the deck(or another jack line) and steps on the mooring line(which has wide plastic tubing on in the center to make the step easier), and winch him/her up high enough to climb aboard."

This scenario assumes that you are strong enough to:
1. Hang on to the side of the boat.
2. Get your feet on that loop that will be slopping around maybe sticking to the side of the boat so you can't get your toe on it or maybe floating up so you can't get your foot that high and still hang onto the boat.

If you are in good enough shape to do that maneuver if you had a removable side deck ladder that went down into the water three steps wouldn't that just be simpler for your wife and maybe even easier for you.

If your life lines are amsteel they can be cut away.

If you can get both hands and feet on a rung of the ladder your wife can put the halyard on the d-rings of your harness and take a few lbs off your legs to help you up.

Your elevator line is by the book and uses what you have already on board. In practice however I think standing on a swinging line will take a lot more strength than climbing a ladder.

Before you spend any money on it it would be easy to rig and give it try.

Any of these things are almost worthless unless you try it on the warmest day of the year of course with a wet suit if necessary with a couple swim team captains.

About the only thing I can almost guarantee you is that no matter what you figure out when you actually try it you will find out something unexpected.
 
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Im just not buying the traditional boom man overboard system working on a potter 19 it just wont work and youll risk flinging your wife into the water

have a fun dog? try with the dog or an adventurous kid first...

200 pounds of the side of a 19 footer no matter how well built and heavy is a recipe for a capsize

id venture to guess you need to be at least 2500lbs and around 22-24feet to do a traditinal mob rig

I used to crew on my dads columbia challenger it was 24, but built like a tank...I would imagine doing so on that boat is fine...it was heavy, cutaway keel and very stable for its size...

19 no way...

sorry

here is what I would do though:

do you have a topping lift attachment?

if you do and its stout rerig the toppingg lift as a halyard big enough for your weight, get a snap shackle on the end and then rig up a very simple purchase system.

1.get a rope ladder that doesnt float(thats key) weighted, prefferably with fixed wood steps) that can be flung off the transom yes transom(make space)

if someone goes overboard the other person HAS to be able to maneuver the boat...

2.mob person grabs onto rope ladder thats weighted so its easy to step on, assuming you can hold on and you have a harness or tether on.

3.use the purchase and topping lift system to keep you on the transom

of course it will be clumsy but thats about all you can do...use the purchase system to inch your way up but not deadlifting.

4.the transom of the west wight potter is straight and vertical so you could install a small stepping block right at water level...once you are there use the purchase system with your arms to get back on but not as a dead lifting system just to help

the angle of the topping lift towards the stern will prevent huge heel angles, youll be more stable boat wise.

just make sure your forestay is beefed up enough or in good condition.

if you are not able to get back on using this system or simply cant in calm water(try with no sails up first) then your only course of action is to not go overboard

if you do you must float and wait for rescue...so have signals a vhf and all sorts of methods so your wife or you can get help soon.

thats all I can think of

good luck

EDIT. notice there is no WINCH in this scenario...
 
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Your elevator line is by the book and uses what you have already on board. In practice however I think standing on a swinging line will take a lot more strength than climbing a ladder.

Before you spend any money on it it would be easy to rig and give it try.
I read this trick in a book and tried it after going for an intentional swim. I was young and in shape and so was the person operating the winch. I couldn't make it work and gave up and climbed up the ladder.

Some ideas are just book ideas. Nobody ever tries this stuff at the dock or in calm water conditions but everybody should!

Medsailor
 

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I know they are famous boats(I used to see them and sail all the time in san francisco too...I sailed out of berkeley) but you are underestimating the traditional mob effect on a boat.

3 people on the rail is not the same as 200 off the end of the boom, for 1 your boom wont handle that weight if for example you plow into a wave will doing the mob, same for gooseneck, etc...

you cant say that your boat will handle it till you try it...same for any boat.

any boat can capsize thats not a hit on the wp19 its a comment for any boat.

you must add waves, wind and other forces to a mob drill.

go try it
 
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Very sobering. I have a swim ladder, but I haven't installed it yet. I'm beginning to think it might be considered safety equipment.

300 lbs can stand on the rail of my little boat with no problem, but I'm imagining that in the rougher conditions that might cause a COB in the first place, the 300 lbs could pretty easily get bounced out away from the boat, then suddenly we've got 300 lbs on a 30' lever working against my keel of 550 lbs on a 5' lever. I don't like those odds….

Regarding rope ladders: I'm in a sailing club with Capri 16s with rope ladders off the back. This boat has very low freeboard, but a lot of people still have trouble getting back in from the rope ladder.
 

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Zarathu

I am familiar with and sail in your area. I am familiar with and sail on my friends WWP 19.

Bottom line for you from me is "stay on the boat". Period. Tether into it if you think there is a possibility of not staying on board.

Rik (If you see me this summer, come say hello. We'll be down there late July.)
 

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gotcha

so get a better pulley, main halyard or topping lift/main halyard and be done with it...

make sure the standing rigging is up to par.

use the purchase system at the end of it and some sort of ladder or step on the transom or sides etc...

cheers

I wasnt familiar with lifesling 2 system
 
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