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One of None
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Thinking I'm long over due the benefits of a anchor windlass. (not to break out the anchor from the bottom. I know) Seems to me, both ways to wire are viable
Charging wire can be over size and still rather small for charging a battery in fwd part of the boat.

Selecting a windlass looks like a very pricey endeavor!
Hunter 34 12 K displacement
 

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Both work, but be certain of that larger wire size. Other considerations are house bank capacity. You'd not want to find you drove the house below 50% getting your anchor back aboard. Windlass are pretty high draw items, probably far in excess of the 20hr rating draw, meaning they'll disproportionately drain the house. Having a dedicated battery forward helps alleviate that concern, but introduces much more expense for the battery and it's charging method.

Seems like Captain's choice. I like the separate battery, if the funding is available.

p.s. how about a bow thruster? I like them on a forward battery too, but also Captain's choice.
 

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First choose the windlass, and get the IRL peak amps and Ah drawn in a worst case session, through actual measurement.

That will then determine the needed wire AWG, probably heavier than you think.

But if you can go that way, take the opportunity to upgrade your single House bank, has lots of advantages over a battery dedicated to that one function, both greater overall capacity and simplicity.
 

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One of None
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
John's I actually know how to do all that!

I seriously doubt I'll ever buy one new, used seem to be mostly "parting out" which kind of confirms to me that anchor windlass have very short lives!

But anchoring, really isn't all that difficult I never really struggled with it once the anchor is broken loose it's pretty easy pull them up. there was a couple times I used a primary winch just because I could.
 

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Hunter 34 12 K displacement???????? You need a windlass if you anchor much.

Yes, expensive beasts. But thats not the question.

Re: Wiring: A windlass uses lots of electricity fast. Recharging a battery uses low charge for a long time.

So if you have a battery forward it has short cable. Good.
As its far forward it will charge slow due to long cable run. But OK for a windlass.
Battery forward and small solar panel on the bow.............? Could run Nav lights too; forward bathroom, cabin etc...?

Mark
 

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One of None
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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I realize I'm up for oversimplifying things but many battery chargers are able to charge two to four Banks that don't necessarily have to be interconnected by heavy switch gear but I could be wrong
 

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bell ringer
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Chose the best lcation for the windlass battery, then cable size as needed. Chosing to reduce cable size instead is just missing the whole point imo
 

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Either way you do it you'll be running pretty big cables.

Assuming you place the battery forward and isolate it so you're only running a charging load to it and assuming that load peaks at 25A, you're still looking at 4AWG. Then all you have powering the windlass is that battery. If you connect it to the other batteries and alternator, the load on that cable will be a lot higher and would defeat the purpose of placing the additional battery forward.

I think the simpler system is not placing a battery forward.
 

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I added a Lewmar V2 windlass to my Hunter 356 when I moved to a larger anchor and more chain and went through the same process and decided on long cables, didn't want another battery or the worry of keeping it charged or the weight forward.

Besides almost always am running the engine...

Jeff
 

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I have 2 Maxwell VWC - 1100 and 1000.. same hole pattern and physical size. I have seen no difference in performance with my boat. I know use a VWC 1000. I was on an anchor for almost 5 years except for fuel and water fill ups.

I ran 2/0 wire from the house bank buss w/ a 150 amp ANL fuse. The windlass on/off switches located adjacent to the battery switches. The wire run was not difficult... through the bilge and up into the anchor locker and to the windlass which is mounted forward of the anchor locker lid. House bank capacity ranged from 400 AH to 500 AH

ENGINE IS ALWAYS RUNNING WHEN THE WINDLASS IS USED

Presumably amps used by the windlass are being made up by the alternator (high output).

When raising the anchor... use the weight of the catanary to move the boat toward the anchor and the windlass to take of slack in the chain, Essentially as the boat is moving toward the anchor...the windlass is NOT used to pull the boat toward the anchor.

139896
 

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bell ringer
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ipersists.i prefer the simplicity , dependability, and longevity of a manual windlass.
The internet is full of electric windlass failures and pleas for parts and repair.
Manual , tried and true.

Pretty much a myth because for every 1 boat you might hear about having a problem with their electric windlass there are 1,000s that you of course never hear about. In 5 years of full time cruising and cruiser get togethers not once have I heard "my windlass stopped working"
 

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ipersists.i prefer the simplicity , dependability, and longevity of a manual windlass.
The internet is full of electric windlass failures and pleas for parts and repair.
Manual , tried and true.
With a due respect...that's an unproven assertion.
I have had an electric windlass for 30 years and no "failures"... worked every time.
I did have a part fail (don't recall whether it was in the gears or the motor itself... and I decided to simply replace after 20 something years rather than hunt for parts and re-build. The new one was less than $1,500 and it was hardly more difficult than changing a bulb. I decided to replace the teak pad as well
As mentioned the owners with failures make the most noise
The ones without failures don't get on the www and crow about how they work so well.
Long story short... windlass has cost me about $100 / year
 

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Old soul
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I don't think electrics are particularly prone to failure -- not any more than any other electrical device. There's also nothing wrong with a quality manual windlass, despite the myths often found on these forums that a manual windlass is hard to use, or very slow, or even dangerous.
 

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I don't think electrics are particularly prone to failure -- not any more than any other electrical device. There's also nothing wrong with a quality manual windlass, despite the myths often found on these forums that a manual windlass is hard to use, or very slow, or even dangerous.
Manual's are fine... Electrics are easier to use and less work.
 

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Tartan 37
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I went through the same debate here when I was contemplating a manual vs. electric windlass. Someone made (at least I thought so) excellent point... A windlass can be considered a safety item. When you need to pull the anchor up quickly, an electric will get it done in a few vs. several minutes.

In addition, as many have pointed out here well... I choose to go with larger cables vs. battery and charger in the bow... Its just to complicated otherwise (at least on most 35' - 65' range boats)
 
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