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Discussion Starter #1
Has anyone ever heard of using two head sails one in each slot of the foil for running wing & wing ?
 

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Yep. My Fantasia 35 had twin head sails. Basically had an aluminum sleeve around the self furling forestay with two jib tracks side by side.
 

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Check out a Vlogger called Sailing Bora Bora... They have done so many times with their boat... My Harken Furler has two tracks for the luff tape... I have only tried what you describe only once.
 

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Has anyone ever heard of using two head sails one in each slot of the foil for running wing & wing ?
Really common to use for DDW trade wind sailing especially before self steering became so prevalent on cruising boats. The twin sails could be set up to steer the boat with the sheets pulling on the tiller. Sails were not especially large and cut with high clew so rolling wouldn't dip a pole.

FYI, wing and wing is running with the main one one side and a headsail poled out on the other not twin headsails.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
It'll be fun to roll up ! Roverhi, I read about using the two head sails set up like that for steering someplace ? Thanks to all.
 

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We have double slots on both furlers on current boat as did past boats. Think that’s pretty common. When racing would prefeed next headsail so two slots was necessary. Now have a solent rig. Great advantage is you can drop the main then pole out double head sails. You can roll in or out desired amount of headsail(s) as required by AWS. This can be done by one person which is ideal for mom and pop cruisers or when on passage. Have even left the pole out and entirely rolled up one of the head sails if we need to go to a reach for awhile before returning to a run.
if you put both headsails in one furler you lose that capability. So would think using both slots simultaneously would only be safe if you knew weather wasn’t going to change and you knew no significant course corrections would be required. Hence think use beyond racing very limited.
Would note some use just use the slot farther away from direction sail rolls up. Thinking less strain on luff line and less likely to pull out of slot.
 

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My foresail foil also has the double slot. I've never yet tried to feed two sails at the same time, but in theory I could. I'd only ever do this if I was certain that gentle conditions would prevail for a long time -- I've never had such a situation :unsure:.
 

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I've flown two head sails down wind across all three oceans, Atlantic, Pacific and Indian. I have never tried to use it to steer the boat and I doubt it would work with the normal tradewind seas which tend to broach the boat.
I wouldn't bother putting the second jib in a slot in the foil, just fly it tacked to the deck and with a tight halyard.
Have two poles attached to the mast with two topping lifts, two foreguys and use the sheet as an after guy. You don't want the pole swinging all over the place, only as a fixed fairlead for the sheet. Lead the sheets to a fairlead amidships and then to the winches, not to the stern as you would with a chute.
If you have the smaller jib to weather, you can even come up a bit and kill much of the rolling. Just ease that pole a bit forward and put a belly in that sail.
Practice in light airs until you've got the hang of it and it will become your favorite long distance down wind rig.
 
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It’s worth the effort to set up as follows
pole with three lines- lift, fore and after guy.
windward sheet through releasable clip at poles end. Have clip face down and be releasable from on deck. Have an expandable cf pole for this. Set it perpendicular to the boat and mast expanded to leave a bit of belly in the genoa.
Then pole is totally fixed in position. One less thing to stress about.
if you only have one pole there’s arguments as to which side to place it on. Some say whichever one is larger. Others say which ever one is to windward. We usually put the larger sail to leeward on a pole and just put the sheet block all the way forward on the windward side solent. As long as you’re 160 to DDW the solent rarely collapses. It does dump it’s air into the poled out genoa on occasion which is ok. There’s not much force in that sail so even an expandable. boat hook is sufficient to rig two poles if you want.
really like two head sails as a inadvertent gybe is just an annoyance and nothing breaks.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
I love these post, can always learn something new. Why DO they put two slots( most of the time), in the foil anyway ? Thank you all for your input, as I said I can always learn something around here !
 

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The double slots are for the racers though the rest might find a use also. Fair the racers, they can set a sail behind the current sail Then drop the old sail so they aren’t bald headed and instantly have a sail set and drawing.
 

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We took a Lagoon 450 on a trans Atlantic yacht delivery that had been modified to have two head-sails (with two poles). It was a great set-up especially for a catamaran.

Pete
 
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