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I store in water in Stamford. Stored in water in New Rochelle, Greenport, North Port.
The marina uses some sort of water agitation system. Haven't seen dangerous ice.
I use more dock lines and check/adjust them at each visit
Visit at least every 2 weeks
remove head sail and send to sail maker for laundering and repair as needed
remove mainsail and send to sail maker for laundering and repair as needed or leave on covered
remove most running rigging, horseshoe, and solar panels
plug into 30 amp shore connection - Use 20 amp charger... 2 8D AGMs
drain all water from fresh water system, open connections at pump, remove spout strainers
We don't drink tanked water, but don't add pink antifreeze to tanks
foot pump until no water. Repeat next visit.
close sea cocks
add pink antifreeze to head, engine bilge water, sink drains
remove food staples... sugar, salt, coffee, oil, pasts etc
remove stowed clothing
remove sheets, and towels
sometimes send oriental rugs for cleaning
top off fuel.. often by jerry can
winterize engine... pink antifreeze
change oil and filter
 

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I've seen ice inches thick in the southern Chesapeake up on the Rappahannock. Meanwhile we haul every year cuz don't wanna think about her in the winter (we love our winter sports!). We still go down a couple times to check on her though. We clearly winterize and also open seacocks once hauled to drain water from them and then close them again as don't wish to risk the yard putting her back in her slip with them open. Leave batteries aboard and simply plug her in on the trips down to top them off. Have never had a problem.

Our marina also forbids heaters if boat is left unattended either in yard or slip. They are fine if staying aboard.
I also do projects onboard in winter. In water is more accessible and warmer than on the hard. When I am there I can run the heater and another electric one if I want. I do not leave heat on when I am not on board. Projects include... things like painting engine, interior varnish, sole varnishing... re upholstering... deep cleaning... renewing wiring... Boat yard doesn't permit a shore power connection to a battery charger on the hard during the winter.
 

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Mostly in water winter storage where the marine has some sort of "agitation system" to prevent ice. Haven't seen a really long deep freeze with a thick ice sheet forms in salt water. One year I needed fuel and motored to a open fuel dock... South Norwalk harbor was iced or filled with slush. I waited for a tug going to sea and followed his no ice wake. When I got close the the fuel dock I had to be a but of an ice breaker... but conditions permitted it. But is was weird. It was not really hard solid thick ice however..
 

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Assuming these are a foot, maybe more, below the waterline, I'm not sure they are the risk. It's squeezing or carving into the hull or expanding inside waterline thru-hulls that don't have anti-freeze past the closed ball, if any.
The hull will not be squeezed, cut of crushed... the geometry prevents that.
Anyone who has a pic of a hull squeezed or cut by ice please post it.
 

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I did not quite understand the procedure but I do understand what you are trying to do: get rid of the water inside the hole of the ball.

Wouldn't it be easier to just fill the hose above the sea cock with AF (e.g. in a sink drain, just pour a sufficient amount of AF into the sink) while the sea cock is closed, then open it for a moment (to let the AF start going through the hole in the ball, and then close it, now with AF having replaced the water in the ball cavity?
This is what you do...
Close the valve and pour into the sink for example... till it fills the hose and then some..
crack the valve and pour more AF in... it will mix and dilute the saltwater,, and drain into the sea and the hose and valce will have AF protection.

The water is usually above freezing. Freezing when it occurs is usually at the surface.... an inch or two or more when there is a long freeze. But the above freezing water that your hull is floating on will make the hull and sea cocks above freezing temps. The air inside your boat may drop below freezing if there is a long freeze. Don't leave drinks in containers over the winter.
 
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