SailNet Community banner

1 - 12 of 12 Posts

·
Glad I found Sailnet
Joined
·
3,842 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
Last night I ran the engine for 20 minutes after changing the oil and filter. Not sure if that’s the right thing to do, but I figured it’s better to get that new oil lubricating everything, rather than just sitting in the oil pan.

What's do you think is the best thing to do?

Of course, I ran antifreeze through the open circuit side of the engine during this time. :)

Regards,
Brad
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,411 Posts
Running the engine to give everything a good coating of fresh oil, and keep the corrosion at bay, is a good practice. The old contaminated oil can become acidic.

That said, I don't do it. I run the engine to warm it up, change the oil, and wait to start it until next season.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,327 Posts
I run it, to bring it up to temp before I drain and replace the oil.

Then, I only run it long enough to add the glycol to winterize it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,675 Posts
If in the water for the winter look to the thruhulls. Hoses with fresh water in them. Even closed thruhulls can burst if internals get cold enough. Outside water temp doesn't count so much. Yu dun good running the engine. Old oil does sit and eat bearings, Drain the exhaust?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
23,485 Posts
The primary purpose of changing oil before winter layup is for it anti-corrosive properties. You never drain 100% of the old oil, so it would seem mandatory that you run it for a bit.

I then change it again during spring commissioning, as those same anti-corrosives have degraded over the winter. That's why oil changes have both calendar time and use limits.
 
  • Like
Reactions: CS Cruiser

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
·
7,411 Posts
I couldn't leave this alone (though I probably should)...

I have an '87 O'day 35 with a Universal M25.

I had some rust on the oil pan from the leaky Oberdorfer raw water pump that I fixed and documented, long ago, in another thread. I held off because access to the oil pan is "challenging" at best. The oil pan sits in a sump, so that access to it involves removing the dip-stick tube, pulling the engine, and removing the engine mounts.

This pic gives you some idea of what I was up against;


You can see the rust on the left side of the oil pan in this picture. I can almost fit my hand between the lower part of the motor mount and the top of the engine compartment. I could not reach the drain plug.

Prior to removing anything, I drained the coolant and the oil. Once the pan was removed, I was surprised to see that it easily contained 3/4 of a quart of oil. Remembering this thread, I reconnected the dip-stick tube to see what the oil level should actually be. I was surprised to learn that When the engine oil level is full, and the engine is at rest, all of the the oil is either in the oil pickup tube (which runs to the pump), in the oil galleries, or in the oil pan. When the engine oil level is full, and the engine is at rest the oil level does not enable it to touch the bearings, crankshaft, engine block, or connecting rod bearings at all!.

Just sayin'
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,421 Posts
Hey,

I run the engine. I want to make sure that fresh oil is circulated through the engine. I also want to verify that the new oil filter gets oil pumped through, and I want to verify that I have the right amount of oil in the block.

Barry
 

·
bell ringer
Joined
·
5,038 Posts
I don't run it because I don't change the oil just because it is winter.
 

·
Courtney the Dancer
Joined
·
3,970 Posts
It's not necessary to run the engine to get a coating of oil on everything, it's already coated (you ran the engine to warm up the oil prior to changing it, right?). I run it to make sure the oil filter doesn't leak and to fill the filter so I can top it off correctly.
 

·
Senior Member
Joined
·
19,488 Posts
It's not necessary to run the engine to get a coating of oil on everything, it's already coated (you ran the engine to warm up the oil prior to changing it, right?). I run it to make sure the oil filter doesn't leak and to fill the filter so I can top it off correctly.
This^^.. only I mostly prefill the filter before installation so that there's no 'void' in the flow during startup. (can't totally fill it because it mounts on an angle). For engines with the filter on a horizontal axis this is probably not possible.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bene505

·
Glad I found Sailnet
Joined
·
3,842 Posts
Discussion Starter #11
But why not run it anyway to get that good, fresh oil covering everything?

This^^.. only I mostly prefill the filter before installation so that there's no 'void' in the flow during startup. (can't totally fill it because it mounts on an angle). For engines with the filter on a horizontal axis this is probably not possible.
Ours is upside down. No way to fill it ahead of time.

Regards,
Brad
 
1 - 12 of 12 Posts
Top