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Learning the HARD way...
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7,794 Posts
Running the engine to give everything a good coating of fresh oil, and keep the corrosion at bay, is a good practice. The old contaminated oil can become acidic.

That said, I don't do it. I run the engine to warm it up, change the oil, and wait to start it until next season.
 

·
Learning the HARD way...
Joined
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7,794 Posts
I couldn't leave this alone (though I probably should)...

I have an '87 O'day 35 with a Universal M25.

I had some rust on the oil pan from the leaky Oberdorfer raw water pump that I fixed and documented, long ago, in another thread. I held off because access to the oil pan is "challenging" at best. The oil pan sits in a sump, so that access to it involves removing the dip-stick tube, pulling the engine, and removing the engine mounts.

This pic gives you some idea of what I was up against;


You can see the rust on the left side of the oil pan in this picture. I can almost fit my hand between the lower part of the motor mount and the top of the engine compartment. I could not reach the drain plug.

Prior to removing anything, I drained the coolant and the oil. Once the pan was removed, I was surprised to see that it easily contained 3/4 of a quart of oil. Remembering this thread, I reconnected the dip-stick tube to see what the oil level should actually be. I was surprised to learn that When the engine oil level is full, and the engine is at rest, all of the the oil is either in the oil pickup tube (which runs to the pump), in the oil galleries, or in the oil pan. When the engine oil level is full, and the engine is at rest the oil level does not enable it to touch the bearings, crankshaft, engine block, or connecting rod bearings at all!.

Just sayin'
 
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