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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hmmm... maybe there's a way to do it but here's my line of thought:

You could just open the decompression lever on the cylinder head and turn the engine over by hand, which will turn the raw water pump thus allowing you to suck up antifreeze, but with no exhaust pressure from the engine actually running you'd be risking just pulling antifreeze into the cylinder and water-locking the engine. I think you're risking a water-lock any way that involves putting antifreeze into the engine without it running.

I've water-locked my 3GM30 winterizing it (not the way described above), and while it's not the end of the world, it sucks to rectify and you pretty much have to change the oil & filter 4 times to clear all the water out of the engine.

Also, if you think it's going to be hard to start now, imagine how pissed-off it's going to be in the spring if you put it away like that.

Personally, I'd do whatever needed to be done to get it running now and winterize it properly.
 

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You could access the water pump (remove the impeller) and use a shop vac or leaf blower or air compressor to blow out any coolant in the system. Home hydronic systems are often "drained" that way, letting the compressed air blow through them for a while. That also gives you the chance to install a new impeller, or leave the cover off and do that in the spring.

When a system is *thoroughly* blown out, some folks just leave it dry and don't worry about anti-freeze. (Which is a bigger expense in home hydronic systems than it is on a boat.)
 

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You could access the water pump (remove the impeller) and use a shop vac or leaf blower or air compressor to blow out any coolant in the system. Home hydronic systems are often "drained" that way, letting the compressed air blow through them for a while. That also gives you the chance to install a new impeller, or leave the cover off and do that in the spring.


going to do this on my 1gm. in the past i've use my wye switch to introduce environmental friendly antifreeze into the water jacket. worth the effort. good luck. js
 

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Draining the engine and leaving it is not good for the engine as you will form Red iron oxide on the inside of the engine and this type of oxide can be very destructive to the engine. Red oxide can cause damage to the protective black oxide coating on the inside surfaces of the engine. use a small electric or hand pump and fill the engine with the winterizing solution
 

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FWIW, I've never trusted "blowing out the water" of a marine system. Unfortunately, air is not very effective at pushing water ahead of it, especially in tubing that is slanting upward. The air usually tunnels through, leaving the water behind in all the low spots. And that water can freeze in the low spots, causing damage. So if you want to minimize the dilution of your antifreeze, it's fine to blow whatever water you can or (even better) disconnect and drain the low points. But you're not going to get all the hidden low points, so it's best to always follow up with antifreeze in your system.

I found the pink propylene glycol-based antifreeze on sale at WestMarine for $3 a gallon, so at that price it was a no-brainer.

Don't buy the cheap orange ethanol-based RV antifreeze commonly sold at Walmart and other discounters. It is known to leach plasticizer out of your impeller and other vinyl parts in your engine's cooling system. Also, the denaturant leaves a sour taste in your potable water system that can take years to leach out. (I know this from experience, since PO used the ethanol stuff in the water tanks.)
 

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To prevent over filling the muffler and hydolocking when adding anti freeze just open the valve on the bottom of the aqualife muffler.,draining to bilge.
 
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