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Discussion Starter #1
i started the process of running my halyards internally. i had to drill some openings in the top of the mast since it was solid. once i got my holes drilled i tried get a snake down the mast to pull some string through. i couldn't get too far so i decided to try from the bottom of the mast. i noticed taped to the inside of the was a string. i figured the p.o. had run the string in case he wanted to pull some extra wires in the future. no such luck. turns out the string was tied to a piece of foam stuffed about 6' up the mast. in back of that about 15' up was another piece of foam with a string. pulled both of those out and noticed a smaller piece of foam located approx. near the spreaders. tried the snake again and after about 20 min was able to get it down the mast. i was able to snake down 3 strings to pull the three halyards down later.
if i can get the halyards down and they run pretty smooth, should i leave the foam near the spreaders in the mast. i was thinking i could get some threaded rod and rod couplers and basically make a 40' piece of threaded rod and force the foam out the bottom.
also, if i take all the foam out, is there a change of the internal wires slapping against the mast?
if that may happen i was thinking of taping pieces of armaflex tubing together and sliding then over the wiring and up the mast. the picture shows copper pipe in the armaflex. this wouldn't be there only the armaflex.
 

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Telstar 28
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I'd take the foam out. It may interfere with the halyards running freely. :)
 

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Discussion Starter #3
so you think i'll have to cover the wires to prevent slapping?
 

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so you think i'll have to cover the wires to prevent slapping?

As you are aware, the foam was there to keep the wires from slapping.
Your best option is to install a pvc conduit inside the mast to contain them and to prevent them from being damaged by your now internal halyards.
This of course requires that the mast be pulled.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
i was trying to keep away from the pvc route. i was thinking the armaflex would keep the wires & halyards from tangling as well as stopping any noise. the o.d of the armflex would be about 1.5-2" depending on what thickness i bought. i was thinking of re installing one piece of foam about 4 feet from the bottom of the mast since the halyards will be exiting between 5-7'. i figure this will help keep the wires in place a bit.
 

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I used polyethylene foam donuts with a hole in the middle when I put internal halyards in the mast on my old Hunter 27. A notch at the front kept the wires tight to the front of mast. The foam is very slippery and the halyards are kept away from wires, screws etc. I put the foam against the end of mast and traced around it, then cut it to that slightly oversize using serrated steak knife. I pushed them up into the mast using my whisker pole from both ends. Absolutely silent halyards!
 

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Larus Marinus
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I have seen a recommendation to attach large cable ties at intervals, leaving the tails on. The tails are supposed to either push the wires to one side of the mast interior, or keep it away, depending on how they radiate. I have not tried it.
 

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I have seen a recommendation to attach large cable ties at intervals, leaving the tails on. The tails are supposed to either push the wires to one side of the mast interior, or keep it away, depending on how they radiate. I have not tried it.
I have. Works great.

The cable ties are about a foot long. Every three feet there are three, each with its tail in a different direction.

There are three internal halyards in the mast, and they run fine. No noise at all from either wires or halyards slapping.

Tim
 

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Telstar 28
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Of course, if you have to pull one of those wires, you're basically screwed royally. :) And a conduit makes running new cables or removing old ones easier, safer and neater.
I have. Works great.

The cable ties are about a foot long. Every three feet there are three, each with its tail in a different direction.

There are three internal halyards in the mast, and they run fine. No noise at all from either wires or halyards slapping.

Tim
 

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Not realy, if something happens that you need to replace one wire, prudence dictates at least inspecting the others, and if you're pulling one wire, it's just as easy to pull more.

Ken.
 

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Of course, if you have to pull one of those wires, you're basically screwed royally. :) And a conduit makes running new cables or removing old ones easier, safer and neater.
Pulling spares or at least a line so you can use it to pull a spare is a easy way fix the "screwed royally" problem.Spare wire is definatly easy if your cheakbook can afford it:) Just remember to lable it.You do not want to know how i know this!!

My Thoughts
Mark
 

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cable-tie method works well !

I have. Works great.

The cable ties are about a foot long. Every three feet there are three, each with its tail in a different direction.

There are three internal halyards in the mast, and they run fine. No noise at all from either wires or halyards slapping.

Tim
I can second this. Last summer I pulled all the wiring out of the mast ... some was in the original counduit, while other wires installed by PO were not in the conduit. I assembled the wires together into a bundle, and fastened four 12" cable ties (with ends radiating in four directions) about every 18 inches. Then with a messenger line at the top AND at the spreaders (for the steaming light), I pulled up while my wife fed the mess in through the hole at the base of the mast. It was a challenge, but we eventually got all the wires where they needed to be! And when we rocked the boat --- no slapping wires! :)
I really liked the fact that we could accomplish this without going into the yard to pull the mast. But it did require many trips up and down the mast to do the job (so invest in some good method to ascend your mast, other than an old-style bosun's chair).
 

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I can second this. Last summer I pulled all the wiring out of the mast ... some was in the original counduit, while other wires installed by PO were not in the conduit. I assembled the wires together into a bundle, and fastened four 12" cable ties (with ends radiating in four directions) about every 18 inches. Then with a messenger line at the top AND at the spreaders (for the steaming light), I pulled up while my wife fed the mess in through the hole at the base of the mast. It was a challenge, but we eventually got all the wires where they needed to be! And when we rocked the boat --- no slapping wires! :)
I really liked the fact that we could accomplish this without going into the yard to pull the mast. But it did require many trips up and down the mast to do the job (so invest in some good method to ascend your mast, other than an old-style bosun's chair).
Nicely done!

Do you have any pictures of this?

Regards,
Brad
 
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