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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am in the midst of a fold up galley extension. I found an old yacht drawer whose sides were teak. After carefully dismantling I joined the three pieces together to create the shelf. The picture is after joining, cutting to size, and initial sanding. Unfortunately I did not have access to a table saw so the squaring was done with a powersaw. This resulted in less than perfect joints. So now before I final sand and varnish with Minwax spar varnish, what should I use for filler? I have kept a baggie full of teak dust from original sanding but am not sure how to approach filling and faring the imperfections. Knowing this forum to house some great woodworkers I thought I would ask here. What I don't want is something that dries to a color that is so off as to be an eyesore.
 

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A good trick for 'laughing' joints - go to an old fashioned paint store and ask for tinted wood fill 'crayons'. These will be graded to the tone and hue that you are trying to 'match'. Just rub the 'crayon' across the open joint so that the colored wax fills the void ... do several times until level. Of course do this after varnishing, etc., then when finished 'filling', varnish, etc. with a teeny brush to protect the 'wax'.

Best is to do the job 'right', in the first place.

In the days before power tools, those who were 'joiners' would take a tee square and scribe a line with a razor knife, then with a razor sharp jack plane, slowly shape the joint to that razor cut 'scribe line'; then with very fine sandpaper (sometimes 'glued') on a dead-flat surface would 'true' the joint ... to perfection.
 

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Some epoxy glue in that gap will take on the color of the surrounding wood and make for a pretty well disguised fill. You can add a little teak dust if you want, but when the dust absorbs the epoxy, it will darken a bit and if you don't finish the rest, it will probably show up darker than the surrounding wood. If you varnish everything after that, it will probably all come up to be about the same color.


PS, I would not recommend spar varnish for a shelf. It stays soft, and stuff might stick to it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I had heard about the epoxy mixed with dust method. May try that. I also agree that getting the joint right the first time is key. But I will experiment (test) with a few of these ideas and go with what works best. I looked for days for a table saw but the boat is in the water making keeping and storing a table saw to be problematic... I also agree that minor imperfections are rarely noticeable to others. I do try to live by the principle don't let perfect be the enemy of good.
 

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Master Mariner
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I have used polyester resin mixed with saw dust for many years. It will take a great deal more catalyst than normal to set, but with the right saw dust (teak, mahogany, etc), it can be varnished and be an almost imperceptible patch. I don't think it will be invisible in this case, but probably better than wood filler or glue.
 

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One of None
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I'm sorry this won't be a easy suggestion to read. The 2 boards that butt each other need a square tight joint or a scarf joint which would be better to make a near invisible joint. The long edge joint can be made near invisable by clamping them so both edges can be hand planed at the same time. Of course this means starting over. Sorry.:-( but if it's only a shelf it may be OK as is,

 
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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
I have used polyester resin mixed with saw dust for many years. It will take a great deal more catalyst than normal to set, but with the right saw dust (teak, mahogany, etc), it can be varnished and be an almost imperceptible patch. I don't think it will be invisible in this case, but probably better than wood filler or glue.
I am leaning towards the resin and dust method. Can you say more about type of resin and mixture ratio of harder? I have almost zero experience with resins. Are we talking West System? Seems like there are almost as many resin options out there as polishes :)
 

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One of None
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Ship the boards to me, I'll joint them properly then ship them back to you at no cost. You pay shipping. I really don't like seeing wood mutilated this way.
Well... I tried to be a bit more tactful,

When I was buiding my Roubo bench I used table saw joints. some of the end joints and knot holes. I filled with epoxy


more saw joints. (mahogany scrap build)
 

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rbyham small 2 tube squeeze epoxy will suffice. Loctite or others . if you use teak dust. (not saw dust, too course) it will turn nearly black.
 
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Over Hill Sailing Club
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If you have a good sharp plane, you can redo those using a shooting board. Find a perfectly straight edge and use it for a guide for your plane, clamping the wood piece just far enough out past the straight edge so that the plane, on its side, cuts down so that the plane frame contacts the straight edge. Even a joiner can't get as close an edge joint as this method when done carefully. Then spline (or biscuit)the joint and use a good wood glue to clamp back together. Forget the wood filler.
 

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If you have a good sharp plane, you can redo those using a shooting board. Find a perfectly straight edge and use it for a guide for your plane, clamping the wood piece just far enough out past the straight edge so that the plane, on its side, cuts down so that the plane frame contacts the straight edge. Even a joiner can't get as close an edge joint as this method when done carefully. Then spline (or biscuit)the joint and use a good wood glue to clamp back together. Forget the wood filler.
Better and vastly 'tighter' than 'biscuits' and 'splines' is a 'pocket screw' joint such as obtained with an inexpensive Kreg Jig:

Kreg R3 Jr. Pocket Hole Jig System - - [email protected]@[email protected]@http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/[email protected]@[email protected]@41auGxMjmXL
https://www.kregtool.com/default.aspx
 
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