SailNet Community banner
1 - 20 of 24 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Do's and Dont's on buy a used wooden sailboat? (from Turkey)

I have noticed that Wooden sailboats in Turkey (Turkish Gullets) are spacious, large, look real nice and most of all cheep, why so cheep? look at these boats I found online for sale (this site won't allow me to post links, but you can see them at "yacht world", they are all over that site..)... Im almost giddy when I think how cheep these are..

My goal is to open a surf/dive charter in Indonesia. These boats look great!! 6 cabins, very roomy.... Anyway, can someone tell my why or why I shouldn't buy these used Turkish wooden boats?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I have noticed that Wooden sailboats in Turkey (Turkish Gullets) are spacious, large, look real nice and most of all cheep, why so cheep? look at these boats I found online for sale (bellow are the links)... Im almost giddy when I think how cheep these are..

My goal is to open a surf/dive charter in Indonesia. These boats look great!! 6 cabins.... anyway can someone tell my why or why I shouldn't buy these used Turkish wooden boats?
 

·
Junior Member
Joined
·
3,505 Posts
Re: Do's and Dont's on buy a used wooden sailboat? (from Turkey)

The Surf/Dive guys I know operating in Indonesia are using catamarans with all the gear. One week tours cost the customer 5K plus. Nobody wants to stay on a leaky, stinky, old wooden boat....
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Re: Do's and Dont's on buy a used wooden sailboat? (from Turkey)

The Surf/Dive guys I know operating in Indonesia are using catamarans with all the gear. One week tours cost the customer 5K plus. Nobody wants to stay on a leaky, stinky, old wooden boat....
I totally agree with your last sentence.. However, did you see the Turkish Gullets for sale on that site? They do look rather nice and luxurious.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
846 Posts
The gulets are worth to consider. They are working in charter business in Turkey. I recomend them for charter, but the boat should be surveyed. You can also contact "Aegean Boats" for a planned replica of the gulets from steel. They are selling a lot to the Indian and Pacific ocean for charter.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
Re: Do's and Dont's on buy a used wooden sailboat? (from Turkey)

I have noticed that Wooden sailboats in Turkey (Turkish Gullets) are spacious, large, look real nice and most of all cheep, why so cheep? look at these boats I found online for sale (this site won't allow me to post links, but you can see them at "yacht world", they are all over that site..)... Im almost giddy when I think how cheep these are..

My goal is to open a surf/dive charter in Indonesia. These boats look great!! 6 cabins, very roomy.... Anyway, can someone tell my why or why I shouldn't buy these used Turkish wooden boats?
They are traditionally built boats, this means they need all the usual TLC that most people just don't do, don't know how, or can afford! Cheap is only the cost of the boat. You don't say where you are but warm waters are not the place for wooden boats there is a worm that eats them in very short order. Do you know how to work wood, obtain that what lumber is needed to maintain such a vessel? Paint and varnish are nearly 365 days a year in need. like a bridge.. maintenance is never ending. Join the wooden boat forum, many of us sail netters are there too.

 

·
Registered
Joined
·
25,123 Posts
Re: Do's and Dont's on buy a used wooden sailboat? (from Turkey)

A wooden boat for commercial purposes would be a nightmare, as best I can imagine. Way too much maintenance, just to enjoy one on the weekends. IMO.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,269 Posts
if you talking about a true made of wood gullet made in turkey then they are mostly made of mediterranean pine. the sea creatures in indonesia would love you for bringing them lunch. more modern materials and it would be a great boat but would cost as much as most motor sailers. it's the O'l pay me now or pay me latter. wooden boats in a wet all the time climate require a lot of maintenance.
 

·
Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
Joined
·
4,525 Posts
When we were in Indonesia there were large, traditional-looking craft that looked to be good for sailing-dive charters. From our experience you end up motoring a lot since the winds in southern Indonesia were pretty light. I have no idea how well-built the local boats are or what they accommodations would be like. You would need to be very self-sufficient. Almost nothing for yachts is available locally. Stuff has to come from Singapore or Oz.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shoalnervo

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,225 Posts
The Turkish Gulets were never designed, nor built for anything more than what they are used for; interisland tour/charter boats in the Aegean. They are not built with ocean sailing nor longevity in mind. They hold up reasonably well in a Mediterranean climate, but would probably not last long in the tropics. There is a very good reason they are plentiful and cheap; they have saturated the market with cheaply built boats. Sorry.
 
  • Like
Reactions: shoalnervo

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
For thousands of years wooden boats were the answer to traversing the oceans of the world. What really has been lost because of cost; are the skills to keep such boats afloat. Countries with very cheap labor can still build the boats. When said boats are taken to places where the dollar cost stops or prohibits routine work needed for large wooden boats, this when they become the big negative. the loss of forests, the loss of natural resources also affects the ability to keep tradition afloat.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
For thousands of years wooden boats were the answer to traversing the oceans of the world. What really has been lost because of cost; are the skills to keep such boats afloat. Countries with very cheap labor can still build the boats. When said boats are taken to places where the dollar cost stops or prohibits routine work needed for large wooden boats, this when they become the big negative. the loss of forests, the loss of natural resources also affects the ability to keep tradition afloat.
Keep in mind that traditional wooden vessels were assumed to have a useful life of less than 20 years. While a 20 year old fiberglass vessel is just getting ready for new electronics. Putting a wooden vessel in warm tropical water is going to cut down on that lifespan compared to the cold water of the eastern med.
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
Keep in mind that traditional wooden vessels were assumed to have a useful life of less than 20 years. While a 20 year old fiberglass vessel is just getting ready for new electronics. Putting a wooden vessel in warm tropical water is going to cut down on that lifespan compared to the cold water of the eastern med.
In the op's other i mentioned that. Warm water and wood =bad.

WE NEED to direct comments to the op, not those who know and love wooden boats and also know the reasons why owning them is only for those that CAN afford them and know the problems.

A trip to the colder water places will find wooden boats much older than 20 yrs. New england, pnw, norway, etc
 
  • Like
Reactions: shoalnervo

·
Administrator
Joined
·
8,345 Posts
A trip to the colder water places will find wooden boats much older than 20 yrs. New england, pnw, norway, etc
But not Turkish Gulets. None would survive that long, either in Turkey or anywhere else in the world. If their survival rate is 10 years they are doing well.

So these guys are selling a hulk with masts at the end of its servicable life.

And, Denise, you are right about the wage rate over "there" to over "here". Just look at all that varnish! They wouldnt be paying $50 per day for the man to do that in Turkey, but you are paying that per hour "here".
You couldnt even maintain it if you kept it in Turkey because its only the locals who could negotiate that rate... You would be on full whities rates.

They may look attractive but they are a hornets nest. The Turks throw NOTHING away. Why would they gid rid of this boat? And why wouldnt someone else in Turkey want it?
 

·
One of None
Hunter 34
Joined
·
8,633 Posts
my marine plywood kayak rotted quietly in some spots under it's deck where there wasn't any air movement and it was under a tarp. "Use it or loose it" really applies to wooden boats of any size!
 
  • Like
Reactions: shoalnervo

·
Bombay Explorer 44
Joined
·
3,619 Posts
Hmm I am the last person to be suggesting wood is good BUT look up Iolaire and Don Street.

Iolaire was built in 1905, sail by Mr Street in the Caribbean for 40 years and still going strong back in Ireland.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,225 Posts
Keep in mind that traditional wooden vessels were assumed to have a useful life of less than 20 years. While a 20 year old fiberglass vessel is just getting ready for new electronics. Putting a wooden vessel in warm tropical water is going to cut down on that lifespan compared to the cold water of the eastern med.
As someone who sailed a gaff ketch through a tropical cyclone when she was 65 years old, I would very much like to disagree with your "a useful life of less than 20 years". There is absolutely no doubt that that very old and well sailed Wm Hand gaff ketch got us through the storm safely, not the other way around.
Most wooden yachts (I'm not talking about the Turkish Gulets, now) were built to last a hundred years or more, not like the plastic crap most manufacturers build today, only trying to maximize their profits. It's how well a good wooden boat is maintained that determines if the builders' expectations are met.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,262 Posts
As someone who sailed a gaff ketch through a tropical cyclone when she was 65 years old, I would very much like to disagree with your "a useful life of less than 20 years". There is absolutely no doubt that that very old and well sailed Wm Hand gaff ketch got us through the storm safely, not the other way around.
Most wooden yachts (I'm not talking about the Turkish Gulets, now) were built to last a hundred years or more, not like the plastic crap most manufacturers build today, only trying to maximize their profits. It's how well a good wooden boat is maintained that determines if the builders' expectations are met.
I am not saying that wooden ships couldn't last longer, but that they weren't expected to. The British navy for example was replaced on average every 14 years (see The Arming and Fitting of English Ships of War, 1600-1815 By Brian Lavery). While some ships lasted close to 100 years the average ship wore out long before this, either due to worms or from what they called weeds (barnacles and other growth).

This lifespan however was extended by two major developments, composite construction (steal framing with wooden planks), and copper sheathing of the hull (but was very expensive often costing more than the construction costs). Frankly the great age of sail was an exercise in the disposable economy. Ships were built, took one or two trips then were sold off and replaced instead of repaired.

Of course there are wonderful examples of ships that were saved, but there are also classic examples of a Ford model T still on the road. But the exceptions are just that, exceptions.
 
1 - 20 of 24 Posts
Top