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· Tartan 27' owner
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The Pearson Triton is a classic plastic boat that has a similar hull shape to my Tartan 27 (1967 vintage). It is a great boat but not one I would want to go out in while the current changes and the wind dies as SD warns of above.
Much as I am not a major fan of outboards I suggest that if you could put a transom mount for a 5 - 8 HP outboard on her you should have the propulsion you will need to get in and get out.
There is an east/west current called 'The Race' just to your east that is caused by the LI Sound and Woods Hole is in a restricted channel between MV and the Cape of Cod which will always cause strong currents. If you do not get an outboard I would suggest that you make sure you have some good anchors and long anchor rodes to keep you from ending up in Nantucket or at Fischers Island or wherever you would end up.
My boat is on the Hudson River with 2-3 knot currents both ways and it is always nice to know that we can get to our mooring when the wind dies. Otherwise you will be calling your buddy with the power boat when you do get caught out and he will get tired of that quickly.
A refurbished Atomic 4 will cost you over $6K from Moyer Marine and a lot more to install on your boat whereas an outboard with a motor mount will cost a lot less. If you have good anchors and are willing to wait a few days until the tides and winds are in your favor I suggest you think about getting some auxiliary propulsion for your Triton besides oars.
It is a great boat and if you only go out for an hour or two you should do fine most of the time. It is the ends of the 'bell curve' that you need to worry about, not the perfect days spent with no motor.
Get the 'Eldridge Tide & Pilot' manual that will give you the predicted tides and has current charts that show you how many knots to expect in your area.
Enjoy.
 

· Tartan 27' owner
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Redstripe,
While I am not familiar with the torqeedo electric motor you mentioned it sounds as if it has enough power. The problem with an electric motor though is not the motor itself but rather the battery bank you will need to make it work. Since you will be on a mooring AND will have no alternator to charge the battery bank you may need to get some serious solar panels to keep the batteries charged up (yes, I would get 2 grp 27 batteries for this). Once you start adding up the cost for all this a 'dependable' outboard starts sounding pretty good. At least with an outboard you can motor as long as you have fuel and if you run out someone can give you a gallon or 2 in an emergency. With an electric motor you will only be able to motor as far as there is enough juice in the batteries. Batteries also loose their charging power as they are depleted and recharged each time so your available motoring time would always be on the decrease.
For aesthetic reasons I too would prefer not to have an outboard but for practical reasons it makes sense.
 

· Tartan 27' owner
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After pricing the Torqeedo engine I would gladly opt for the gaseous devil known as an outboard. Around $1700 at Worst Marine for just the engine!
You would still need a battery (or two) for a lout-board but you can store Jerry cans of gas in case you had to go a longer distance against a foul current. I would look for a 2 cycle outboard that is hopefully in good shape as they are lighter pound for pound to HP then the 4 stroke models. The only problem with the 2 strokes is that they pollute a bit more AND you can't buy a new one in this country.
Pearson Triton is still a nice boat even if it has an outboard hanging on the transom.
 
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