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30 and 70 make a world of different... even 50 and 70. Seniors will to go offshore at their own peril. It in not prudent to do it without some young strong hands on board. Learn to accept the diminished capacity and change.

This couple was too old for what they had to face.. and not prepared and their guard was down. But who wants to sail with the expectation of a killer storm in their path?

It's pretty much an AARP convention out here mate.

My friends Jim & Joy were not to old to do this! I guess a windward passage SESE from Asia to Fiji and then down to New Zealand and back to the PNW to complete their circumnavigation wasn't enough preparation in your book? Read a bit more carefully and ask your self why Joy was looking for her walking stick? We used to ride bikes together in Malalysia..she had suffered from a crippling leg issue form a childhood bout with polio. Some of the gutsiest and experienced cruisers i've met.

Don't let your own infirmities cloud your ideas what others are be doing out here.
 

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S2 7.9 Bear Lake, UT
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Jordan Series Drogue.
You will find some 10 y.o. posts by SailingDog here where he raves about the JSD.
After i posted the question I did a random search of the files in my head and came up with the name. It did not take long for me to figure it out since they have my name. It seems like a no brainer to have one of these when crossing oceans. Although I seem to recall some posters being against them or at least conversations as to which way to have the boat lie when deploying them.
 

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It's pretty much an AARP convention out here mate.

My friends Jim & Joy were not to old to do this! I guess a windward passage SESE from Asia to Fiji and then down to New Zealand and back to the PNW to complete their circumnavigation wasn't enough preparation in your book? Read a bit more carefully and ask your self why Joy was looking for her walking stick? We used to ride bikes together in Malalysia..she had suffered from a crippling leg issue form a childhood bout with polio. Some of the gutsiest and experienced cruisers i've met.

Don't let your own infirmities cloud your ideas what others are be doing out here.
I assumed these were your friends based on your post earlier. I imagine it's got to hurt vicariously to see them go through this. Even though they survived, to see their circumnavigation cut short, would feel like loosing a friend.

Were they able to recover the boat?
 

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No, but there is where they departed and the spillover can still hurt. What caused the problem?
 

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Is that some sort of drogue? I was wondering is such conditions they did not have one out? I try not to judge their actions because they have a world of sailing experience over me. Well not quite the world but close.
I don't like drogues, period. I believe the boat is safer being able to be steered out from under a breaking wave, kinda like a surfboard.
But that's my personal preference, from my own experiences, and I do not advocate that my preference is correct for anyone else.
I will say though, I fished that coast from Mexico to Alaska on crabbers and salmon boats as a teen, and it is one of the most consistently rough and dangerous places I have ever been. Hurricane season in the Caribbean is a cakewalk in comparison. After all, you can avoid the hurricanes, especially with internet weather that we have available today, but that coast has few safe harbors and even if you know bad weather is coming, there's little you can do to avoid it, if offshore.
 

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I have a sea anchor. If I had a cat I would have a series drogue.

I haven't rear the article and have no intention of reading it. I know what the risks are.

*They got off an unsunked boat of their own volition. Reasons probably age/shock/injuries/mental health.

Met a guy yesterday... Been waiting at this maria 5 years waiting for his mother to die. Sounds like she has another 5 years in her. So he will be 70 before he starts again.

Go now.

Oh, the other bit about old people... They think cruisibg is healthy, it is... But they don't do any gym. They are old, healthy but soft.

When in Port work out.
 

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I don't understand the reported conditions. 30 kts of wind and 30 ft seas. Is there a counter current in that area, shallow depth? And what would have been the mechanism of the roll? Broach and roll?
 

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Discussion Starter #31
There happened to be a piece on FB about those waters st the confluence of the Columbia and the Pacific, great video....nasty body of water. They got caught wrong place wrong time. We should not quibble or Monday morning quarterback their actions.
There's always somebody else's opinion. They're alive after a 35+day passage, probably tired. We weren't there.

I too have my learning points gleaned from this saga. They didn't want to be pulled, but when tired, freezing in 50 degree water up to your ankles, etc etc...might do the same...and the CG can be rather convincing I'm sure.

Let's just nod and be grateful, not judgemental please.

Sent from my SM-G965U using Tapatalk
 

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Though not mentioned in the article..the USCG can deem a vessel unseaworthy and justifiably terminate the voyage of that vessel and extract all crew...

Very difficult to force someone to abandon ship.

Especially an Australian with a full larder of expletives. Starting with that one about sex and travel.
 

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Very difficult to force someone to abandon ship.
I can't imagine the Coast Guard forcing someone to abandon ship in a storm. It's seems difficult and dangerous enough getting a willing rescue victim into a helicopter in a pitching sea. To forcibly extract them would be a lot harder, with or without the Aussie Attitude.

If I recall this happened 180 miles offshore. Does the USCG have any jurisdiction there?
 

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If I recall this happened 180 miles offshore. Does the USCG have any jurisdiction there?
Nope.

They claim to have ability to board any US flagged vessel worldwide for drug inspections... But I cant see happening without a host country permission. So only in international waters for that.
In reality drug seisures are normally don't when a suspect vessel arrives in the next port.

But your point on how difficult it is to get a willing person off a boat safely is the crux. If a USCG swimmer 180nms off the coast had to somehow overpower a citizen on a non-sinking ship the Damages claim in court would be Huge!
 

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Note..in Mexican/International waters..

http://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/military/sdut-should-coast-guard-have-forced-owner-from-sailboat-2011dec05-htmlstory.html

“The Coast Guard may board any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, whether on the high seas, or on waters over which the United States has jurisdiction, to make inquiries, examinations, inspections, searches, seizures, and arrests for the prevention, detection, and suppression of violations of U.S. laws. 14 U.S.C. § 89.”

Note: the USCG Search and Rescue areas..

https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=gmdssArea
 

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I believe that if you have called them for assistance, then they DO have full, legal jurisdiction, even that far offshore.

Gary :cool:
I guess if you call them and they show, they should have something to say about the continuation of your trip.

I think the story about the blind guy is fishy.

He called in an emergency.
Unless the aft cabin was filled with $100 bills or it had a gold keel, no Flicka is worth $150k.
 

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Note..in Mexican/International waters..

Coast Guard forces owner from boat - The San Diego Union-Tribune

“The Coast Guard may board any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, whether on the high seas, or on waters over which the United States has jurisdiction, to make inquiries, examinations, inspections, searches, seizures, and arrests for the prevention, detection, and suppression of violations of U.S. laws. 14 U.S.C. § 89.”

Note: the USCG Search and Rescue areas..

https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=gmdssArea

As I said, that's for drug inspections.
 

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Note..in Mexican/International waters..

Coast Guard forces owner from boat - The San Diego Union-Tribune

“The Coast Guard may board any vessel subject to the jurisdiction of the United States, whether on the high seas, or on waters over which the United States has jurisdiction, to make inquiries, examinations, inspections, searches, seizures, 777and arrests for the prevention, detection, and suppression of violations of U.S. laws. 14 U.S.C. § 89.”

Note: the USCG Search and Rescue areas..

https://www.navcen.uscg.gov/?pageName=gmdssArea
I would be a bit surprised if Mexican teritorial waters extend 60 miles out to sea, more likely 12 miles.

The vessel in the article was an American flagged vessel in what is likely international waters. The USCG has legal authority to inspect US flagged vessels on international waters for safety.
 
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