SailNet Community banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
46 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Does anyone else find it incredibly awkward to work dual-lever engine controls? I'm curious if anyone has any tricks to dealing with these:



My difficulty is that I have tiller steering and these controls are on port side of the cockpit close to the stern. I'm right handed, so I stand just to the left of the tiller in a relatively narrow area. Any time I need to gun the accelerator momentarily, I need to squat, fuss with the controls, stand, then squat again to change it back. And lord help me if I'm making a starboard turn at the same time, when I have to maneuver around the tiller and somehow fuss with the controls (which are now behind me), while paying attention to what's going on in front of the bow.

Anyone have any tips for dealing with these, short of installing a wheel or changing the controls?

-Milkjug
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
8,867 Posts
Does anyone else find it incredibly awkward to work dual-lever engine controls? I'm curious if anyone has any tricks to dealing with these:



My difficulty is that I have tiller steering and these controls are on port side of the cockpit close to the stern. I'm right handed, so I stand just to the left of the tiller in a relatively narrow area. Any time I need to gun the accelerator momentarily, I need to squat, fuss with the controls, stand, then squat again to change it back. And lord help me if I'm making a starboard turn at the same time, when I have to maneuver around the tiller and somehow fuss with the controls (which are now behind me), while paying attention to what's going on in front of the bow.

Anyone have any tips for dealing with these, short of installing a wheel or changing the controls?

-Milkjug
Sounds like perhaps the location is more of a problem than the two lever control? Many larger outboards have a single lever control:

https://www.google.com/?gws_rd=ssl#q=single+handle+motor+controls

Paul T

Edit: Maybe some way to rig up removable lever extensions?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
830 Posts
Mine's to Stbd; but same-o, same-o. I was exasperated to the point of trying to find bulkhead mounted shifter/throttle. Price and time saw to it that I became used to the low mounts.. I still might chop the shifter a tad;as it protrudes over the seating. I might even fabricate a. bag or box to cover the evil sticks when sailing.. Lines attend to wrap themselves about the handles :eek: Now that I'm more familiar with them and handling the boat, I'll prollystickwith them.

Mounted to Port?Must a been a Leftie or Brit ! ;)

AFA operation??
Motoring in FWD is easy-peasy, as your not going in/out gear a lot. Maneuvering in/out of slip/marina is. where it gets dicey.. Only time I might have. trouble is when the tiller is waaaay over to Port and I needto rapidly switch gears or throttle. Then I simply let tiller go and do as needed, then back to it. My docking regimine is to go to neutral while heading in,coast into fairway and start 180 turn. When in approx position I desire, I swat tgears into R. andwait while the prop chews the water and starts to move back'ards, while tiller is hard over to Port, trying to ease severe prop walk. Onceshe's moving some, back to centered/whatever and control is better.. Then out. of R and wait for boat to come tonext waypoint.; stbd quarter tothe dock. Just when you think she'll. hit, throw the tiller hard to stbd annd gear into FWD a bit tostop. All while standing R of tiller,left hand controling. and RH avail for controlling gear/throttle. A bit of stooping with head up and swivweling is necessary ;) Actually works better'n it sounds :D
Slo. as you go, easy on the throttle and a light hand on the tiller. Whatreally helped me was finding a nice, calm and empty spot; working the. T/G levers and tiller all at once.Must a appeared foolish backing and fwding all. over; but it worked a. treat to find. out. how to do it and how tthe boat wanted to do it best :D

HTH,
Paul
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
There are no "standards" for where the levers are. I prefer two handles over one any day of the week. You get used to it. Is this a new boat for you?
 

·
One of None
Joined
·
8,040 Posts
I don't know about newly made ones. b But I've never seen anyone that has one in their boat not struggle with them shifting fwd/rev or fast or slow rpm
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,019 Posts
^^ Whats the problem with single lever controls?

I have twin engines; how much fun do you wager it would be to work 4 sticks while backing into a slip? I wanna watch.

Problems controlling throttle? I will say that they basically did not know how to use them. Period. I back into my slip every sail and find them very smooth. Perhaps there is a bit of a touch, but once learned, very easy and smooth. It is possible that single levers are more tolerant of hard-shifting engines and bad linkage routing. Coudn't say. I'm shifting 9.9 hp Yamahas.

Fear of the unknown, perhaps.

Sail Delmarva: Shifting: A New Morse MT-3 and New Cables
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
Most twin screw motor yachts have 4 levers plus a wheel, and the sport fishermen, as well. You failed to mention however, to all the single screw sailors on here, how absolutely simple it is to handle a twin screw vessel. Kinda takes the challenge out of docking, when the boat will do a 360 in her own length, or power sideways, with a little coaxing. In reality 4 levers is a lot easier to use than 2 and a lot safer, which is why most motor boats use separate levers.
 
  • Like
Reactions: christian.hess

·
Registered
Joined
·
712 Posts
Most twin screw motor yachts have 4 levers plus a wheel, and the sport fishermen, as well. You failed to mention however, to all the single screw sailors on here, how absolutely simple it is to handle a twin screw vessel. Kinda takes the challenge out of docking, when the boat will do a 360 in her own length, or power sideways, with a little coaxing. In reality 4 levers is a lot easier to use than 2 and a lot safer, which is why most motor boats use separate levers.
Not only that... but twin outboards??? Apples and oranges here me thinks. I just don't see many twin screw (or outboard) sailing vessels in my marina. I think we have a couple cats.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,434 Posts
Lets see now.... driving a standard shift automobile..... left foot for clutch, right foot for throttle, left hand for steering wheel and right hand for gear shift. Anybody remember the good ole days. Or maybe flying a little Cessna, left rudder/left foot; right foot on right rudder pedal; yoke in or out for up or down attitude while perhaps turning yoke a little left or right with some rudder to bank a nice turn while holding altitude.............
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
Not only that... but twin outboards??? Apples and oranges here me thinks. I just don't see many twin screw (or outboard) sailing vessels in my marina. I think we have a couple cats.
Unless you have counter rotating props on a twin screw outboard vessel, they can be a real bear to handle.
 

·
Master Mariner
Joined
·
9,055 Posts
Lets see now.... driving a standard shift automobile..... left foot for clutch, right foot for throttle, left hand for steering wheel and right hand for gear shift. Anybody remember the good ole days. Or maybe flying a little Cessna, left rudder/left foot; right foot on right rudder pedal; yoke in or out for up or down attitude while perhaps turning yoke a little left or right with some rudder to bank a nice turn while holding altitude.............
It would be most unusual to need to operate a throttle at the same time you are shifting in or out of gear, so that reduces the complexity quite considerably. When operating a twin screw vessel, it is also unusual to use the helm, most of the vessel control is done with the props. Of course, you can get fancy and get her to walk sideways, using props and rudder, but again, rarely all three at the same instant.
If you really want to see how it's done, be on the dock when the big sportfishermen back into their slips after a day of fishing. The captains stand with their backs to the wheel and controls and make it look like these 60 odd footers are on a rail! No cautious, easing into their slips with 1600+ hp under the deck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,690 Posts
I've had several powerboats with twin screws, but they ALL used single lever binnacle controls. Now, when I had a C27 powered with an Atomic4, it had the same configuration you have - it was a piece of cake to handle under all conditions. I would suggest, however, you add some type of tiller tamer to your tiller, thereby allowing you to lock it down when necessary.

Good Luck,

Gary
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
41 Posts
I have exactly the same set up on port and do most of the throttle and shifting with my foot. easy except getting out of forward
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top