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I would be interested to here anyone's who has completed a World ARC in the past 5 years, their opinion on doing the World ARC. Very vague question but give me your thoughts and would you do it again?
RDW
 

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I would not, you get IIRC 18 months to do the trip, if you can not sail at a given spee, you must motor to make sure you make the full commitment etc.

Along with there are usually 50 or so boats that do this cruise/race around the world, you probably have all of 150-300 people thru out the world that have one this! Chances of you finding someone on/from this or any forum, is probably a needle in a haystack find frankly. You would be better off finding the names, address's etc of past people and direct email or letter to them to get an answer!

marty

Marty
 

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We were in Mauritius when the World ARC boats came in and disrupted everything. They had the only good docking area reserved (even before they arrived you couldn't use it. I get a sense that it might work (assuming you wanted to around really quickly and were not too worried about seeing many things) if you had a very fast boat and got to each destination at the front of the fleet. The first two boats into Mauritius were an X-50 and a 50+ cat. They were there for a few days before anyone else arrived. I suspect being the smallest/slowest boat would not be good as you would get to port have only a couple of days to fix things and provision and then we off again. You would have no time to relax and be a tourist. If you want to do a fast circumnavigation there is no reason why you can't do it yourself. We crossed paths with a HR43 with a father and son crew were doing a two year trip and having a great time.
 
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Sailboat Reboot
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I too have run into the World ARC on my travels. It does seem that they are in a hurry - it is about getting around the world, not smelling the roses. They do overwhelm small ports.

I think people join the ARC for two reasons:
1. Because the ARC people are intended to smooth the way at each port. That may happen but is no infallible - half of the World ARC boats were refused admittance into the Galapagos.
2. Because there is safety in numbers. The truth is, as I know from sailing in company - that even with other boats around they are generally 4+ hours away from helping one. If the weather is bad they are most likely incapable of helping anyway as they are struggling on their own.

Fair winds and following seas :)
 

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I think people join the ARC for two reasons:

...

2. Because there is safety in numbers. The truth is, as I know from sailing in company - that even with other boats around they are generally 4+ hours away from helping one. If the weather is bad they are most likely incapable of helping anyway as they are struggling on their own.
Every once in awhile, however, that whole 'safety in numbers' thing might conceivably pay off...

News articles from World Cruising Club: Yacht Ciao sinks after collision with submerged object

 

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We have a couple in our club who completed the World Arc a few years ago on a Sundeer 60. They have raved about their experience and had plenty of time to visit and explore on their 18 month trip. Their also is the flexibility to take an extra year and pick up with the following years group.

They met some lifetime friends cruisers who traveled in that Arc just like any group of cruisers would. They picked up great experience in doing two Carribean 1500 before trying it and just completed their third one this year on their boat Crazy Horse.

So whose opinion do you take the pundits behind the computer....or the people who did it. ( no offense Kiilaarny as I followed your trip closely and respect your circumnav. )
 

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The world ARC folk did a seminar/presentation at my club and while it sparked my interest to a degree-they certainly seemed like a well oiled machine, it is not something we would personally do.

It's certainly on the quick side of things for RTW but i believe it is aimed squarely at a new type of 'cruisier' who would find the concept ideal. Unsurpisingly the people most interested in my club were well heeled, ex racing folk with quick boats and a quick lifestyle who would do this with rotating crews, partners who fly in and out and for them the timeframe is probably perfect.

The cruising purists will cringe, but if its your cup of tea why not.
 

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The world ARC folk did a seminar/presentation at my club and while it sparked my interest to a degree-they certainly seemed like a well oiled machine, it is not something we would personally do.

It's certainly on the quick side of things for RTW but i believe it is aimed squarely at a new type of 'cruisier' who would find the concept ideal. Unsurpisingly the people most interested in my club were well heeled, ex racing folk with quick boats and a quick lifestyle who would do this with rotating crews, partners who fly in and out and for them the timeframe is probably perfect.

The cruising purists will cringe, but if its your cup of tea why not.
Yup, not my sort of thing, either... But the sort of folks who've chosen to go that route certainly seem for the most part to be pleased with their decision...

Coming Full Circle | Sail Magazine
 

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My experience in the WARC was crew on the 3000 mile leg from the Galapagos to French Polynesia on a 60' cat. As previously mentioned there are positives and negatives. Slower boats coming late into a small anchorage got the worst spots and had the least amount of time to enjoy the stop. With that in mind, leaving the Galapagos, some boats left early because they determined the weather was better than the scheduled departure date. One boat weary of the entry denial (bottom growth as determined by a govt agent) got fuel and provisioning, perhaps spent a day or two without clearing in.... and took off. Other boats left late because they were waiting for parts. One or two boats left on schedule but turned around within hours because of autopilot failure. All the boats that ran outside of the schedule did meet up in Hiva Oa eventually. The double edged sword of the WARC from my view is that it is perceived as a rich group to have money extracted from. Speaking with other cruisers I learned that fuel prices, laundry service, tours etc. all charged more for the WARC boats. The regular cruisers mentioned that internet speeds plummeted when the WARC boats showed up... In the Galapagos I spoke with a cruiser from St Thomas who had no issue or inspection of his hull before granted entry. The WARC was clearly picked out for inspection of a rule that is rarely enforced for regular cruisers. It caught the ARC officials completely offguard. To their credit, the ARC people worked very hard with local officials to resolve the problem and come up with a workable, but onerous, solution. Clearly having the ARC reps smoothing the way is a large benefit into clearing into and out of some of the islands.

The boat I was on did stop their circumnavigation in New Zealand. I believe they intend to continue when the next WARC comes through. On the Yellowbrick tracker I noticed a bunch of boats jumped onto the WARC after Australia.

It is definitely a social group!!!
 

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I did half a one in 1998 when Jimmy Cornel was running it. I have a great time! I was crewing on three different boats.

If I had a big boat and plenty of money I would certainly do one. Its a floatig village of fun, good sailing and great site seeing.

The difference to normal cruising is you pack it all in. So you arrive in port, hit the dinners, jump the tour busses and get cracking o the next leg. You certainly don't have time to gently scrape the barnicles off the boat here and there... You need a properly prepared boat that would be maintenance limited.

It turns out to be like a round the world race, but casually, warm, not wet and enjoyable.

There is no real downside. If you like that sort of thing you will love a world ARC.
 

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Its not and "or" thing, in my mind, its an "and".
A circumnavigation can be one fast and then slow. I am on my second circumnavigation... But its gunna be verrry slow. But if the first one was slow maybe I woulnt know what I am missing for 10 years, or only get to the fun spots when I am 76 1/2.

The ARCs 18 months is such a sliver of life that Bahamian snow birders havent even played two season of volleyball, but others have curcuited the whole world.

Do an ARC as a prelude to the main game.
 
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