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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I built this Dory a few years back and it's boat number 3 so I'm looking to try to kill 2 birds with one stone as I start sailing,and not have to buy boat #4, if it would be safe and not too expensiveI would like to add a sail to it.I would be using it in the Rehoboth Bay in De.I did put a small keel on it,just a 2 by 4 for running a trotline and it did help me go straight,but not sure if it would be enough or even if its a good boat to try to sail in.
 

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That shape would have some form stability but without ballast under sail it won't be enough. The bigger issue will likely be the tendency to 'skate downwind' with no keelplan to resist that, and making progress to weather difficult.

In short, not a good candidate unless all you wanted to do was save some fuel when you're heading downwind. Might be fun to try though...;)
 
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
That shape would have some form stability but without ballast under sail it won't be enough. The bigger issue will likely be the tendency to 'skate downwind' with no keelplan to resist that, and making progress to weather difficult.

In short, not a good candidate unless all you wanted to do was save some fuel when you're heading downwind. Might be fun to try though...;)
I take it the 2 by 4 keel would be of no help ? They were my 2 biggest concerns as it is a very light boat and we do get some decent wind.
 

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I take it the 2 by 4 keel would be of no help ? They were my 2 biggest concerns as it is a very light boat and we do get some decent wind.
Right.... adding a leeboard as linked by Rich wouldn't be that difficult and would certainly help with leeway but you'd still be primarily relying on crew placement for 'ballast'...
 

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The problem with adding a mast/sail, rudder and leeboards will be getting the CLR/CE relationship correct ... for correct helm balance.

You can probably find a cheaper route, by seeking out a 'beater' sailing dinghy with all the 'numbers' already worked out and all the bells and whistles sailing stuff already included. ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
The problem with adding a mast/sail, rudder and leeboards will be getting the CLR/CE relationship correct ... for correct helm balance.

You can probably find a cheaper route, by seeking out a 'beater' sailing dinghy with all the 'numbers' already worked out and all the bells and whistles sailing stuff already included. ;-)
Being that I'm new to all of this, I have 2 questions,what would constitute a dinghy ? that sounds small ,and would it be something I'd have to switch sides on and duck the sail ?
 

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Being that I'm new to all of this, I have 2 questions,what would constitute a dinghy ? that sounds small ,and would it be something I'd have to switch sides on and duck the sail ?
If you don't put a ballasted keel on your boat then you are the ballast which requires you to "switch sides" and "duck the sail" regardless of which other mechanism you use to counter leeway.
Generally speaking, a dinghy is an open boat, unballasted, and if equipped with sails also includes a centerboard and rudder. They can be anywhere from 8 - 20 or so feet long, but are always crew ballasted. If you go this route, it would be wise to also install positive floatation into the hull so that capsize does not equal sinking.
John
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
If you don't put a ballasted keel on your boat then you are the ballast which requires you to "switch sides" and "duck the sail" regardless of which other mechanism you use to counter leeway.
Generally speaking, a dinghy is an open boat, unballasted, and if equipped with sails also includes a centerboard and rudder. They can be anywhere from 8 - 20 or so feet long, but are always crew ballasted. If you go this route, it would be wise to also install positive floatation into the hull so that capsize does not equal sinking.
John
Thats educational,I can't really do too much to the boat as its my crabbing boat,although the ballast would probably help because I need it to run a perfectly straight line when I'm crabbing as I run a trotline.I do think ballast would be needed as the boat is very light,I estimated around 600 lbs,it's just 3/8 inch plywood and 2 by 4s.How much ballast do you think it would take ?
 

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In reality without putting the ballast down low (ie in a keel that you don't have) mostly you'd just be weighing things down and going slow(er).

I think the 'kayak sailing' mentality would work.. sail when your course is generally downwind, save some fuel then. In that case , a couple more 2x4s and a bed sheet will get you going! ;)
 

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Basically the ballast resists the force of the wind on the sails so sail size would be an important factor. As well as where you put the ballast. If you put a very small sail on it you may have sufficient form stability so that ballast may not be necessary. But you won't make much speed with a small sail.
Look at the link above to the John boat sail rig. It might meet your needs.
Welcome to the world of yacht design. What you think may not be correct.
And remember the positive flotation.
John
 

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Add 2x4 outriggers with closed end pvc pipe, for stability. Experiment with how far out they need to be for the proposed sail.

Sailing off Essington requires close attention to tides, currents and ships, but sail the waters you have, not the waters you would like.

I suspect sailing Rehoboth Bay requires a shallow draft and close attention to water depth.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
Add 2x4 outriggers with closed end pvc pipe, for stability. Experiment with how far out they need to be for the proposed sail.

Sailing off Essington requires close attention to tides, currents and ships, but sail the waters you have, not the waters you would like.

I suspect sailing Rehoboth Bay requires a shallow draft and close attention to water depth.
Rehoboth Bay is fairly deep in most places,There are a few sandbars that you can stand on in low tide.I do know my way around the bay though as its not that big and I've been boating in it many years,I wouldn't try Essington as my boat stays at my place in De and I'm just a short ride to the bay
 
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