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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My wife, son, and I are restoring a 1972 Yankee Seahorse 24. It appears only a few of these boats still exist.

Does anyone have any photos of the swing keel showing where and how the swing keel cable is attached to the swing keel?

There is currently a rope connected to swing keel. We would like to replace the rope with a stainless steel cable, before we launch. If the rope breaks, will the swing keel fall to the bottom?

The boat is currently on a trailer and we are wondering if there is a way to cut an access point from above so we could get access to the connection point inside the cabin. We could then fiberglass over the area we cut off. It would be nice to see a photo of what we should expect to see, before we start cutting a hole in the boat.

We are documenting the process of our restoration with photos and text. We are hoping to launch the boat in about a month. Our restoration blog title is Sailboat Project or Bust.
 

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Instead of steel cable (unless you happen to have some on hand) I would use Dynema or similar high tech line and do a Brummel splice. Easy quick and likely to last the life of the boat.
 

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Welcome to Sailnut!

https://sailboatprojectorbust.wordpress.com/

The one reservation I'd have about using dyneema instead of the wire rope that was most likely originally used is that dyneema is susceptible to chafe.

I suppose you could cut into the center board trunk from above to find the attachment point on the board but that seems like a lot of extra work to me, since you will have to glass over any holes in your center board trunk before launching.

Normally, work like this could be done with the boat up in a travel lift, or crane so you can access the center board from below. Without access to a travel lift or crane another option is to attach your center board pennant when your boat goes back in the water, eg, using scuba or snorkel gear to work on it under water. If there is a diver at your lake then he/she could help you out with this process.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank you for your reply, CalebD. Yes, I agree that cable replacement is normally done from below the boat. We live on a lake and although there are a lot of sailboats on this lake, there are not many options that we've found for raising the boat up high enough to work on it.

In order to raise the boat, we would probably have to rent a crane capable of lifting 3000 lbs, plus we would need Jack stands to support the boat while we worked on it.

One other option we are considering is to place a rope at the top of the mast and roll the boat 85 degrees in shallow water to get the stub keel above the water. Then pie the boat off with more ropes to hold it in place. Once stable we would wad out into the water and remove the 200 pound swing keel. Most likely, this is the method we will try, if we cannot replace it from within the cabin.

The swing keel is the only thing we have not been able to get to on this boat. I hope it does not fall off before next summer when the water warms up again.
 

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The PO of my boat (a Yankee Dolphin 24) used a jack and some home-made sling braces to hold the boat while he drove the trailer out from under. He then dug a hole under the centerboardso it could be lowered all the way to deal with the pennant, and painting it. The dolphin24 website (Dolphin24.org - A Website For Dolphin Owners and Others Interested in this Classic Design) has instructions on making and using the sling braces.
If you are worried about dyneema chafing, then you need to fix the chafe problem first.
 

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This boat originally came with a rope, Marlow pre-strecth I think which was also used for halyards, not wire to lift the centerboard. There are two plastic sheaves that the rope runs around before getting to the centerboard winch. If the rope breaks it the board will swing to the down position. On the boat my father owned, way back when they first came out (tall-rig) he ended up having 2 stainless sheaves machined, one that split in half in order to upgrade the system to stainless wire. This was after the rope breaking twice due to abrasion.
 
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