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As someone with over 25 years of experience in maintaining and repairing diesel engines I recommended the use of Power Service and Lucas Oil Additives, this is because I know a whole lot more about diesel engines than most of you will ever know. These are not "secret sauces" they are tested and proven commercial additives used by companies like J.B. Hunt, Schneider, Swift, Werner, Halliburton, KBR, Nabors, and hundreds of other large companies because it works. Now if you want to listen to someone who is not a diesel mechanic, has zero diesel engines in his shop to be rebuilt, and thinks that most marine diesels do not have glow plugs because he has seen one or two without them, go ahead.

I hate giving advice on here because there will always be some ding a ling who thinks he knows more than someone with literally thousand of hours of training and experience who will come along and tell everyone how the expert and highly trained professional is wrong. I wander if a doctor were telling you that you should take a certain medicine if you wanted to live longer, would you go to a palm reader and take their advice instead? Would you prefer the advice of someone who earns a six figure income because he knows diesel systems, or the advice of a person who sells doughnuts or something for a living?
Here's a response back from Mack Boring in particular Larry Berlin, Service Trainer, when I specifically asked about Lucas additives in Yanmar engines.

I remember he saying from taking one of his classes that additives are not recommended but to make sure there had been no change in their policy I went ahead and asked for clarification on the product mentioned
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Hello Mr. Owen,



Yanmar does not recommend any oil additives.



They recommend you use a high grade 30W or 15W40 viscosity oil that meets

or exceeds API specs of CF4 or higher. Mack Boring follows these recommendations.



Oils meeting these specifications are readily available. Follow the oil change intervals

as given in the operators manual or once a season whichever comes first.



Have a great boating season.





Larry L. Berlin

Training Services

A Division of Mack Boring & Parts Co.

Phone 908-964-0700 ext 298

Fax 908-964-0856

========================================================
..Just an FYI..Larry Berlin has probably taught more mechanics as well military personnel in the subject of diesels than most..so I have a great respect for his wisdom...
 

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mark2gmtrans said "As someone with over 25 years of experience in maintaining and repairing diesel engines I recommended the use of Power Service and Lucas Oil Additives, this is because I know a whole lot more about diesel engines than most of you will ever know.
There you go again. Do you just enjoy insulting people, or just tooting your horn to make yourself feel good, or trying to convince yourself you know something? You didn't need to add the "this is because... ", maybe you do, and maybe its applicable, maybe not, but what do you gain by insulting everyone else. Your not the only one that's ever learned things in their lives.

Unless "power service" has changed (could have) it wasn't all that good in treating #2 for cold weather in the mid 80s... but then we were in what most would call severe cold... minus 30s routinely... coldest I've ever operated in was -50. PS was only good to like -20 or something in preventing gel up. What its good for on other properties I do not know. But I will not put in in my cummins. If I have to operate the Cummins in "gel territory" I'll top off with #1.

Personally, I will not run additives in oil or fuels... I've seen them cause issues with seals and linage mostly in the old school engines/systems (which many of our 20 and 30 year old boats fall into BTW). I even had a poly tank that additives somehow caused the poly to dissolve a little and totally implant itself around the fuel pump's intank filter (gasoline Dodge). It restricted the filter's flow to nothing once the fuel level dropped below a filter bypass line that protruding above the filter to about the 1/4 tank level. Took a while to figure out what was happening as above 1/4 tank it ran just fine as the pump could still get fuel.

Today's materials are more tolerant than yesterday's... (which is probably why fleets can get some of the benifits) but there are few substitutes for frequent and complete servicing.

I do know also that marketer's truly push the limits on their claims. We had a second name for our Marketing class back in my college days... its was called "Liars class". 80 or 90% of most of the claims a product will do is exaggerated or only relevant in an extremely small percentile of cases. Take this into account when you read labels... no matter who's product it is.

There are very few or no true magic pills to solve or prevent issues in any engine.

Run a good quality proven virgin oil (I do not trust reclaimed...) changed at 1/2 the manufacturer's suggested interval (I've seen the pan inside my 250,000 mile engines that were still clean enough to eat off of...), yes 1/2 the interval... its cheap insurance. Remember, there are only two reasons engine bearing surfaces wear... cold start limited oil film cushion, and micro fine dirt particulates being circulated with the oil and too small to be trapped by the filter. As time progress the concentration of these micro particles increases... especially in diesels.

Always do regular periodic maintenance on all systems, change out simple things like belts and linage at the first sign of fatigue, way before they fail... do the whole system then not just the one with the most fatigue, the rest are likely not far behind).

I also strongly recommend always installing proper monitoring gauges eyed in a sweep across the gauges every minute or two when operating (once in this habit it only takes a micro second to spot something outside its normal operating range)... its part of good operation of any piece of equipment... your boat's engine is just another piece of equipment designed for a certain duty. Redundancy on oil and temp gauges using different system types (mechanical and electronic) is also a good idea.

I believe Mark2g is mostly trained in modern designs... a lot of our old boats are old school. Keep that in mind. He'll likely deny it though.

Dave
 
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mark2gmtrans said: "As someone with over 25 years of experience in maintaining and repairing diesel engines I recommended the use of Power Service and Lucas Oil Additives, this is because I know a whole lot more about diesel engines than most of you will ever know".

Hmmm...while not wishing to engage in a urinating contest, it doesn't matter who you are, or what your field of expertise is, there is ALWAYS someone out there who is better, knows more, has more experience, is smarter, whatever.

Intelligent people can read these forums and decide for themselves what is good advice, especially when sources such as manufacturers are quoted.

Perhaps we should all post our formal qualifications, years in our speciality and sailing miles?

I find some of the comments here quite enlightening, some educational and some quite blatantly biased. No prizes for picking the biased......
 

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So Mack Boring suggests API CF-4 or better?

Jeez, the API has only one word to say about that: OBSOLETE!

CJ-4 Current
CI-4 Current
CH-4 Current
CG-4 Obsolete
CF-4 Obsolete
CF-2 Obsolete
CF Obsolete
CE Obsolete
CD-II Obsolete
CD Obsolete
CC Obsolete
CB Obsolete
CA Obsolete

About Engine Oil

If a can (excuse me, bottle) of oil on the shelf today only had a CF-4 rating, I'd snatch it up and sell it on Antiques Roadshow.
 

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That a neat site Hellosailer. I saved down the pdf.

Worth a look if your interested in oils you all. I'd love to get my hands on their test data for the various brands, but I doubt that's possible (and rightfully so).

I've searched the internet for various studies.... I found only three brand based and 1 independent based. In that case it was gear lube I was researching. Funny thing (well actually not so funny)... the brand site tests always showed theirs as the best... of the 8 or 10 they tested. At first I was interested as one was a brand I use... then found two more that said theirs was... so it was meaningless... I just love marketing (NOT)!

Dave
 

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Here's a response back from Mack Boring in particular Larry Berlin, Service Trainer, when I specifically asked about Lucas additives in Yanmar engines.

I remember he saying from taking one of his classes that additives are not recommended but to make sure there had been no change in their policy I went ahead and asked for clarification on the product mentioned
-------------------------------------------------
Hello Mr. Owen,



Yanmar does not recommend any oil additives.



They recommend you use a high grade 30W or 15W40 viscosity oil that meets

or exceeds API specs of CF4 or higher. Mack Boring follows these recommendations.



Oils meeting these specifications are readily available. Follow the oil change intervals

as given in the operators manual or once a season whichever comes first.



Have a great boating season.





Larry L. Berlin

Training Services

A Division of Mack Boring & Parts Co.

Phone 908-964-0700 ext 298

Fax 908-964-0856

========================================================
..Just an FYI..Larry Berlin has probably taught more mechanics as well military personnel in the subject of diesels than most..so I have a great respect for his wisdom...
I am sure Larry has taught a lot of classes, and he knows a lot about engines. I am kind of wondering what he knows about oils though. I was gone for a few days, but others already beat me to it, the type of oil he is listing is not available. You can find oil that exceeds the standard, but oil has changed a lot over the years and like I said before, I recommend Lucas Larry is more than welcome to recommend oil that is obsolete, impossible to find, and not produced today. I just buy Rotella for diesels and add Lucas to help keep the oil where I want it, you can do what you want to do with your engines.

I know there are people with a LOT more experience than I have, just like I have a LOT more than most people do, but I give my opinion based on my experience. I get a lot people who seem to think that my being in Texas or my being a full time oilfield mechanic working on both old and new engines somehow translates to my not knowing my stuff well enough to work on a 1975 model engine. Fine, I have too much work as it is, and have had since I was a kid, take your engine to someone else, get your free advice from someone else or not, it makes me know difference at all.

I have my own engines to work on too, and I am trying to get time to do them, but it seems that other people's engines keep getting in my shop and I do not have the time or the room to do any more than I am right now.

My brother told me once not too long ago that the reason he never gives out free advice and consultation is that the people asking are just going to argue, and not do what you advised them to do anyway, so why waste the time? He is certified with Cummins, Mack, Caterpillar, Detroit, Perkins, and a couple of others as well as Allison, Eaton, and some of the others, and together we have done a few mechanic jobs over the years, but no one wants to listen to the things people getting paid to do the work have to say. Instead they go around until they can find someone who agrees with them.
 

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<del>Mr. Owen</del> The man at Mack Boring works for a corporation, and there's a high probability that corporate counsel, or someone in the corporation, has decided to Cover Thine Ass in this litigious society by recommending what the manufacturer recommended in their original and normally unrevised manual. So if his recommendation is for a product that's been obsolete for a decade and is no longer the best choice for engineering purposes, he probably knows that. And for liability, rather than engineering, reasons, that's the story he'll stick to.

That's sadly normal corporate "technical" support these days, has been for a long time.

Cover Thine Ass.
 

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Mr. Owen works for a corporation, and there's a high probability that corporate counsel, or someone in the corporation, has decided to Cover Thine Ass in this litigious society by recommending what the manufacturer recommended in their original and normally unrevised manual. So if his recommendation is for a product that's been obsolete for a decade and is no longer the best choice for engineering purposes, he probably knows that. And for liability, rather than engineering, reasons, that's the story he'll stick to.

That's sadly normal corporate "technical" support these days, has been for a long time.

Cover Thine Ass.
Oh?..and what "corporation" do I work for...or..are you just trolling?

Clay Owen aa3jy
 

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My apologies, Clay. I read an earlier post as "Mr. Owen" bring the man at Mack Boring. I'll go back and edit my post to correct that.

I don't troll. Even for fish.
 

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This is similar to another recent thread. In researching oils, the only modern classifications that seem to be ok for Yanmar or heavy use diesels are API ratings of CL-4, CJ-4, and CH-4. Their descriptions specify them as the replacements for all the "obsolete" oils. I stopped looking for the manual-specified CD rating years ago.

Oil companies like Shell and Exxon, etc. spend millions of dollars in additive research done by the best chemical/petroleum engineers in the world. IMO, it is unwise to add a concoction that tries to second-guess them.
 

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Hear hear! 'Concoction' being the operative word. Also, unspecified additives in a new or overhauled engine could void the warranty.
Should the engine suffer damage - whether or not caused by the additive - the ensuing claim could get messy, because we all know that when money is concerned big business and insurers will duck for cover if there is any possible 'out' that can be used to exonerate them or their product.

If the manufacturer wants stuff added, the manual will say so. For example, my Moto Guzzi motorcycle manual suggests a Moly additive in the final drive gear oil. However, it is a fairly old manual for an old-fashioned bike, so if a newer grade gear oil already had a Moly content, I would not be adding any more.

However, if you have an old, worn engine that is burning oil or obviously on its last legs, I suppose it is reasonable to try anything to prolong the inevitable overhaul or replacement.
 

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"Also, unspecified additives in a new or overhauled engine could void the warranty."
Not in the US, not since the 1960's.
The US auto manufacturers used to say your warranty on a new car was void unless you used their oil, changed at their dealerships. Someone took them to court and the courts said that was a nice try but also was illegal restraint of trade. Now, if someone wants to claim "You broke it" they have to show specifically what you did that broke it. They can't just say "You used an unauthorized additive" but they have to show specifically, what product did what type of damage.
And any reputable maker of additives will also give you an express warranty that their product will not void the manufacturer's warranty, or they'll pick up the costs themselves.

Which doesn't mean their products aren't of much use for anything except "makes me feel good" and there's always some value in that too.
 

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Fair enough comment - consumer protection is alive and well, in the USA at least.

But, playing devil's advocate: Suppose some-one wishing to 'feel good' put an additive in during the early life of the engine. It does not run-in the way it should - for whatever reason. The engine is serviceable, but oil consumption is excessive. The manufacturer makes no guarantees about maximum oil consumption - we have just come expect it to be almost minimal in today's engines.

I don't think anyone could be held to blame for that except the owner.
 

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Fair enough comment - consumer protection is alive and well, in the USA at least.

But, playing devil's advocate: Suppose some-one wishing to 'feel good' put an additive in during the early life of the engine. It does not run-in the way it should - for whatever reason. The engine is serviceable, but oil consumption is excessive. The manufacturer makes no guarantees about maximum oil consumption - we have just come expect it to be almost minimal in today's engines.

I don't think anyone could be held to blame for that except the owner.
I would think that a company in business for a very long time, with a solid reputation for standing behind their product, ( if you use Lucas or Power Service anti gel treatment in a semi and it gels they pay the tow bill), and a proven benefit to the engine would not be the cause of some mystery damage. Like I said before, some things you add because they work, they give the benefit they claim to give, I like sweet tea, I add an additive purported to sweeten things, it works just like it is supposed with no surprise after taste, it is called sugar. When I want to reduce the bacteria in my fuel tank I add Power Service Diesel Kleen, when I want good adhesion to surfaces from my oil at all temperatures I add Lucas. These things I add because they do as they are advertised to do by the manufacturer. CYA guy from Mack Boring has to say things that way because he is paid to say what he is told, but if you contact Cummins, Mack, Caterpillar, Detroit, or any other engine manufacturer and ask them specifically about using Power Service or Lucas they will not tell you that those things are bad for the engine.

Rotella is designed for diesels, is used by several manufacturers as the OEM engine oil, but it is not CF-4 because CF-4 was declared obsolete in 2007.



http://www.sinwal.com/data/LUBE REPORT_ API_ CF-4 Diesel Oil Now Obsolete.pdf

API: CF-4 Diesel Oil Now Obsolete
By Lisa Tocci
WASHINGTON, D.C. – API CF-4, a heavy-duty diesel engine oil category
that debuted 17 years ago and continues to hold a sliver of the market,
was declared obsolete yesterday by the American Petroleum Institute's
Lubricants Committee at its semi-annual standards meeting here.
Beginning immediately, no new licenses for the category will be accepted or
issued.
The demise of CF-4 was pretty much a given, since one key engine test for
the category – the 600-hour Mack T-6 test that measures piston and ring
wear, viscosity change and oil consumption – is no longer available. API
had asked ASTM, which defines the test, whether the newer Mack T-12 test
might be an acceptable substitute, but ASTM's Heavy Duty Engine Oil
Classification Panel came back with a firm negative. There's no data to
support a correlation between the two tests (they use different engines and
measure different performance parameters), so this option is not open, the
panel responded.
The Engine Manufacturers Association, which represents the interests of
diesel engine builders, has already agreed that without the test to support
it, API CF-4 licensing needs to be discontinued, Kevin Ferrick of API told the
meeting. The engine builders also requested that API encourage its
licensees to upgrade their products to at least CH-4, the performance
standard that was introduced in December 1998 and is fully backward
compatible with the expiring category.
Would you really trust a manufacturer's representative who was six years behind the curve on his knowledge of lubricants? Not so much.
 

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Would you really trust a manufacturer's representative who was six years behind the curve on his knowledge of lubricants? Not so much.
Larry Berlin of Mack Boring response...

============================

Hello Mr. Owen,



All we are saying is what Yanmar’s minimum requirement is.





.



Larry L. Berlin

Training Services

A Division of Mack Boring & Parts Co.

==================================

My question if the above individual have ever met one another..or better yet been Yanmar serviced trained?? Larry can only speak for Yanmar as the OP's thread was a concern about his Yanmar..
 

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No surprise thatt Mr. Berlin is clearly stating their recommendation is based on liability rather than engineering.

"Rotella is designed for diesels, is used by several manufacturers as the OEM engine oil, but it is not CF-4 because CF-4 was declared obsolete in 2007."
Ah, Mark, most engine makers would say "must use oil that meets or exceeds API standard CF-4..." If they were amateurs who said the engine simply required CF-4, well, that's what open mike night at the comedy club is for.
Engine makers have gotten used to lubricant standards being a moving mark for a long time now. This ain't the 1950's any more.
 

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just like I have a LOT more than most people do, but I give my opinion based on my experience. I get a lot people who seem to think that my being in Texas or my being a full time oilfield mechanic working on both old and new engines somehow translates to my not knowing my stuff well enough to work on a 1975 model engine. Fine, I have too much work as it is, and have had since I was a kid, take your engine to someone else, get your free advice from someone else or not, it makes me know difference at all.

I have my own engines to work on too, and I am trying to get time to do them, but it seems that other people's engines keep getting in my shop and I do not have the time or the room to do any more than I am right now.

My brother told me once not too long ago that the reason he never gives out free advice and consultation is that the people asking are just going to argue, and not do what you advised them to do anyway, so why waste the time? He is certified with Cummins, Mack, Caterpillar, Detroit, Perkins, and a couple of others as well as Allison, Eaton, and some of the others, and together we have done a few mechanic jobs over the years, but no one wants to listen to the things people getting paid to do the work have to say. Instead they go around until they can find someone who agrees with them.
Wowee...

When you can spout years of experience repairing, maintaining, troubleshooting and servicing small diesel engines in a marine environment, then maybe you will actually have the credibility that will generate the respect you so desperately think you currently deserve.

To date, the sum total of your bragged-on diesel experience- driven "advice" is to pimp two manufacturer's fuel additives.

Hey, you want us to bow to your "experience" and take your "advice" without question? Get your story straight. Depending upon which thread one reads here, you are a truck driver, or a water expert, or a mechanic with 28 years of experience who doesn't understand torque, or a pipe inspector, or a guy who has watched steel get loaded and hauled. You come in here three months ago bragging on 10,000 offshore sea miles in one thread, then in another thread admit that you have crewed on two Gulf cruises on other people's boats that ended early.

Pick a story and stick with it.

If you and your brother notice people arguing with the "advice" you give maybe you might want to reconsider the value of that advice.

BTW, i notice you brag on your brother's certs, but where's yours? I mean, after all, if you know more than lots of us, allegedly have 28 years of experience and get hissy when anyone questions your advice on additives, maybe you can show us some "Texas Diesel Mechanic of The Year" plaques or Westlawn diplomas or something.
 

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Yea, I didn't appreciate his blatant direct attack on me either... when he obviously missed the whole point on light vs heavy duty designs and didn't understand the marine environment and what in essence is an Archimedes' screw trying to "screw", albeit inefficiently, through a fluid medium when at speed (as in a planing hull) combined with the primary forces in effect which are a combination of all three of Newton's laws of motion depending on several factors. He somehow mistakenly thought there was a 1:1 relationship on the prop's engagement to its medium as there is in a purely mechanical link to a load as in a direct connected machine or rolling stocks traction to its road. A prop does not have a true 1:1 engagement. The actions of the water on the hull almost always absorbed by the the prop's slip and do not impart enough delta to the shaft/torque to activate an internal governor. But he missed all that.

But hey we're all idiots in his mind.

Most of the marine installations I've seen were governed solely by the prop. In diesels where the engine included internal governing as part of its injector pump design... if properly propped... the prop's upper end of governing and the engine's internal will meet only near 100% torque and the max rpm the prop will allow at that torque input. If over propped it will not even get near the governor's max rpm setting. If under propped it will and prevent over revving. But he missed that too.

I also tried to explain that insulting every one did him no merits... but its doubtful he'll listen.

Dave
 
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