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Discussion Starter #1
I have a 2GM20F with the steel stop cable. It is time for it's every 6 month greasing, which is sort of an annoying job.

I know that an electronic/solenoid controlled stop is a factory option. How easy of an upgrade is this to add? My friend's boat with a Beta engine has solenoid controlled stop and it is a lot nicer to use.

I'm okay with knowing that I'd need to do it manually if something failed in the stop circuit.
 

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I have a Beta20 with the solenoid. I'm probably going to add a manual cable control to it.
Belt AND suspenders! :D
 

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Discussion Starter #3
Everyone (cable or solenoid) should know how to turn off their engine directly from the engine, bypassing whatever control system is installed. I'm not sure how a manual cable is that much more reliable than the solenoid.
 

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6 month greasing?

Alex every time someone tells me they do that I cringe. What you are doing is packing in grease that then binds the cable.
Most often things are fine until someone decides to service them.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
My cable rusts and starts to bind if I don't grease it. I completely remove it, clean off rust, lightly grease it, and put it all back together.

The panel on my boat has been replaced at least once because the friction on the stop cable put too much load on the panel. On the last replacement (the only one that I've done) I also put a backing plate on the cable.
 

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Freedom 39
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I would just buy a new cable to replace the old one and see how many years it can go without needing attention. By chance does your existing cable have a lot of tight radius bends? I replaced the shifter cable on my boat with one that was 2' longer so the bends wouldn't have to be so tight. The old cable slid smoothly once removed. The new longer cable worked great.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
My cable is too long. Pearson or whoever installed it corrected that with some too tight loops of cable. I corrected that to have much larger bend radii.

If I replace the cable I'm likely to do it with teflon lined bicycle brake housing and die drawn stainless cable. The boat-specific options here seem to be similar at best, but for about 4x the same amount of money. Bicycle brake cables are designed to take a lot more load. Has anyone experimented with that?

I was hoping to learn about changing between the systems, not just replacing what I have.
 

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Freedom 39
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To change systems is relatively easy. You will have to acquire the stop solenoid which attaches to the same place your stop cable does on the engine. Mount it and adjust it for proper travel. Run a pair of wires to wherever you wish to mount a momentary switch, probably near the helm. Mount the switch. Connect the wires so that when you push the stop switch it energizes the stop solenoid.

What you now have is a more complex system with more potential points of failure. Make good connections and understand how to shut the motor down in the event your new electrical stop system fails to work when you need it.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Thanks, I was hoping it was as simple as it looked.
 

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It appears that you are considering a solenoid that mechanically operates some kind of lever? We had a VW diesel that had a solenoid that opened/closed the fuel supply. While my wife was driving on one of the busiest boulevards in San Francisco it failed, no go. Luckily, she was in the right lane and found a spot to pull off in.

I would think a properly operating cable would be more dependable. I have read that a large CO2 fire extinguisher blown into the intake will kill a runaway.

Paul T
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Was your VW a 1997-2003 model? The engines used on those have a relay that drives that solenoid that was faulty. It also failed on my 2000 Gold TDI. There was a cold solder joint inside the relay.

As long as the solenoid fails open (as if the cable is pushed in) I don't see what the danger is. If the engine won't stop then I'll leave the boat in neutral and push the stop lever manually. This is different than your Golf example where it prematurely stops the engine.
 

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Courtney the Dancer
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Generally the stop solenoids close when they lose voltage (not familiar with the Yanmar kit). I've never had to grease a stop cable on any of the many diesels I've had with one, there must be something wrong with it. I know you are hoping to switch to the solenoid to reduce the maintenance but I'd go with the KISS plan so the engine can continue to run without any juice.
 

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If you do go ahead with the solenoid a full off on switch (like an auto key set up)prevents partial shutdown and suckback of cooling water.(I know for a fact that this can cause bent conrods) Still should have some kind of manual over ride both off and on for those interesting moments
 

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I have the stop button on my 1987 Yanmar 4JH-TE. It works well. One year the solenoid broke and I had to turn the engine off manually on the engine. It was a pain but not difficult. On my previous boat I had the cable. Both methods are easy to operate, although your cable seems to have issues mine did not have.
 

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Was your VW a 1997-2003 model? The engines used on those have a relay that drives that solenoid that was faulty. It also failed on my 2000 Gold TDI. There was a cold solder joint inside the relay.

As long as the solenoid fails open (as if the cable is pushed in) I don't see what the danger is. If the engine won't stop then I'll leave the boat in neutral and push the stop lever manually. This is different than your Golf example where it prematurely stops the engine.
It was a 1979 VW Rabbit diesel, had it for a number of years with only one failure. Before the failure I had purchased a spare solenoid which I kept in the car. I don't recall a separate relay ahead of the solenoid?, just battery from the switch. The solenoid was closed when no battery was present, spring loaded, I think.

I had a 3-71 Detroit diesel that had a cable which worked from the wheelhouse and the flying bridge. Not sure if it operated the "flapper" valve, which cut off the air or if it went to the fuel rack? In any event, I think a properly maintained cable is fairly fool proof?

Paul T
 

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If you do go ahead with the solenoid a full off on switch (like an auto key set up)prevents partial shutdown and suckback of cooling water.(I know for a fact that this can cause bent conrods) Still should have some kind of manual over ride both off and on for those interesting moments
It is my considered opinion that any solenoid (naturally open or naturally closed) should only ever be operated by a push-button switch. A full on/off switch will leave the solenoid energised one way or the other and the solenoid will cook itself to destruction within a short time frame.
 
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