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We may be about to buy a boat that currently has the mast pulled for winter. The yard did the work, and we'll have to pay them in spring to step the mast again. That brings up my question: Will the yard normally also tune the rig? By "tune", I just mean the basics, like making sure the mast is straight from port to startboard, and has the appropriate rake. I don't mean racing prep.

Basically, I'm asking if I'm going to have to not only pay a yard to step the mast, but also spend hours myself or pay someone to adjust all the standing rigging after they step it.

Of course, I realize each specific yard will vary on the work they do, and we'll definitely ask this yard this question when the time comes, but it would be nice to know what's "normal" in terms of spring re-stepping/rigging. Anyone have any experience with this?
Thanks,
J
 

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Yard Stepping

J,
Even if the yard put a great "tune" on the rig after you "splashed" the boat in the spring,,,,,,,,,,you WOULD have to "tune" the rig again in a week or so, depending on how warmed up/un-stressed the boat is. A sailboat is in a continuous change of rig tension, depending on it's water/air temperature. So after the boat "relaxes" in the water from the yard stay, you should "tune" the rig. The fiberglass hull will eventually change shape when it hits the water after a stay on the "hard".
Tuning the rig isn't "rocket science" if you can read a tuning meter. Get ahold of the rig's or boat's manufacturer and they will usually give you a "tuning how-to" to at least get started. After a while you will get accustomed of the needs of adjustment.....

.........Hey----------it's a Sailboat!!!!!!!!!!!Ya gotta love it.......

Now that's "just my opinion"..............capt'n tye
 

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Sunfishin is right on. It will change again.

I wouldn't let anyone from the yard do anything with the rigging other than put the stick up and put the clevis pins in. Don't even let them put the cotter pins in. Be there when the stick goes up and do all that stuff yourself.

Its your boat. Learn it know it and love it!
 

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Yard tuning the mast after stepping.

J,

In most cases the yard will do a basic job of adjusting the rigging when they step the mast.

If you have chance, check out their rigging dept. You will be able to get afeel for the kind of work they do and how much you want them to do.

I don't know what your level of experience is, but you will find it a good experience to be there when they do the work so you can see what is involved and perhaps make some notes and ask questions, also take some photographs. Make sure you ask the workers permission before you go taking lots of photographs of them working. If you get some good ones share them with the yard workers or forward them to management with a complimentary note. Keeps relations where they should be.

It will also go a long way towards helping you understand your particular vessel's systems and be more effective and proactive in the management of your asset.

Congrats on the new boat! If this is the one.

Hope that helps,

John
 

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I got the same thing going in about two weeks down in Punta Gorda, Fl. I got a rigger who's lining up a crane. The rigger is going to do all of the monkey work to step the mast on the keel and hookup all of the stays, shrouds and roller furler. I just plan on taking lots of pix and asking questions. He said it takes about two weeks in the water for the boat to achieve some kind of a final hull shape before he'll actually "tune" the rigging. Our rigger charges $75/hour and should be worth the cost, especially since I only plan on doing this once in the forseeable future.

Good luck with the adventure!!
 

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Hello,

Are you sure that you have to pay to have the mast stepped? Most places around here (Long Island Sound) include the cost of putting the mast on and splashing the boat as part of the haul and store costs.

Anyway, the places that I have dealt with made sure the mast was straight and all the rigging was connected. They got things 'sort of tight' meaning it was good enough to sail in light winds, but you really needed to tune it before sailing in anything over 10 kts. You could just tighten each piece a few turns and that would be good enough to get you going.

Barry
 

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LearningtobeaLiveaboard
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We are having our mast restepped and rerigged and the mechanic gave us a price of $400 t0 $500. are we getting the screws?
 

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We are having our mast restepped and rerigged and the mechanic gave us a price of $400 t0 $500. are we getting the screws?
Without knowing what kind of boat you have, how much reassembly is necessary, how much rigging is being replaced, whether it's deck stepped or keel stepped, it's impossible to answer your question. There are just too many variables.
I hope by mechanic, you mean rigger.
 

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LearningtobeaLiveaboard
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more info

It's a 29 ft Columbia, deck stepped, we had it shipped up via truck and most of the rigging is still hooked up except the bottom portion, i.e None of it was disconnected at top... Just unhooked from deck and taped up. The mast is currently in two pieces (half on deck and half down below).

It only cost around $150 to get it "unstepped," and the rigger (/mechanic - guy used by the marina where we are renting a slip) seems to be giving us the run around on the quotes for re-stepping. He's already cost us some money by sending us around to different yards from not knowing which one had the ability to unload the boat (they couldn't, then a week later they could, then when the truck got there they couldn't, meanwhile the driver is hanging around waiting for them to get their s*** together....). If he's a "professional" how does he not know these things? But the marina and the yard where we unloaded both named him as the guy they use to re-step.
 

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Without knowing what kind of boat you have, how much reassembly is necessary, how much rigging is being replaced, whether it's deck stepped or keel stepped, it's impossible to answer your question. There are just too many variables.
I hope by mechanic, you mean rigger.
from ther post

"Tracey
29' Columbia (fingers crossed)
soon to be liveaboard in the Panhandle of FL "
 

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INDENT](/mechanic - guy used by the marina where we are renting a slip) seems to be giving us the run around on the quotes for re-stepping. He's already cost us some money by sending us around to different yards from not knowing which one had the ability to unload the boat (they couldn't, then a week later they could, then when the truck got there they couldn't, meanwhile the driver is hanging around waiting for them to get their s*** together....). [/INDENT][/COLOR.
i would find someone Else to do the Job, but that is just me
 

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LearningtobeaLiveaboard
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i would find someone Else to do the Job, but that is just me
I noticed you were in the FL Gulf Cost - any recommendations? We really don't want this guy working on our boat, but it seems no one local/nearby has any other names to give us. We don't mind traveling to develop a relationship with someone trustworthy.
 

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from ther post

"Tracey
29' Columbia (fingers crossed)
soon to be liveaboard in the Panhandle of FL "
Missed that, thanks.

lottobemine said:
It's a 29 ft Columbia, deck stepped, we had it shipped up via truck and most of the rigging is still hooked up except the bottom portion, i.e None of it was disconnected at top... Just unhooked from deck and taped up. The mast is currently in two pieces (half on deck and half down below).

It only cost around $150 to get it "unstepped," and the rigger (/mechanic - guy used by the marina where we are renting a slip) seems to be giving us the run around on the quotes for re-stepping. He's already cost us some money by sending us around to different yards from not knowing which one had the ability to unload the boat (they couldn't, then a week later they could, then when the truck got there they couldn't, meanwhile the driver is hanging around waiting for them to get their s*** together....). If he's a "professional" how does he not know these things? But the marina and the yard where we unloaded both named him as the guy they use to re-step.
I don't understand exactly what you're describing here. If the yard has a travel lift that's capable of lifting your boat, where's the problem? How could they not be able to do it, then be able to do it and then not be able to do it again?
I don't understand the course of events. You are saying that the yard where the boat was unloaded recommended this guy to you but you also seem to be saying that this guy is the one who arranged to use the yard that unloaded the boat? Sorry, I'm totally confused.

Bottom line, if you were here in Saint Petersburg, I would recommend one of three or four yards depending on whether or not you wanted to do any work on the boat yourself before she splashed or not. If you wanted a full service yard, I would have you come to the yard where I have my shop where the boat would be unloaded from the truck and either blocked to be worked on or put directly into the water.
I would probably charge you a half hour to get the mast off-loaded.
From what you describe, it would probably take about one hour to get the boat rigged and into the boat.
Then it would take about another hour to hang the boom, tune and bend on sails.
If you have an anometer, there would be a few minutes more to take a man aloft to install that. (I usually put those up after the mast is up to avoid damaging with the crane cable).
So, figuring about two and a half hours and one crane fee, you're at about $335. and that's with no products and everything going to plan. You might need spreader boots, you might want your lights tested and bulbs replaced before stepping, you might need new cotter pins or rings, etc, etc.
It really doesn't sound like the guy is too far out of line to me, but there is a lot I am only guessing about.

"The mast is currently in two pieces (half on deck and half down below)."

Please explain what you mean there.
 
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