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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
What are my options for parking this boat in this slip?
I've done it once and it worked out OK but not the exactly the way I wanted it to.

The problem was that the wind was from my stern as I came down the fairway.
The plan wast to go down far enough to turn into the "P" dock then do a K turn and tie up port side.

What happened is that since I was going very slowly I was unable to get the bow to swing upwind enough and I got pinned against the piling to the right of the waverunner docks.
It was no problem I just springed off the piling and forced the bow around and and it worked fine. During the season however their may be boats protruding from the pilings.

The constraints are that this has to be single handed and has to be port side tie up.
My dock is the end of "O" where the blue dot is.




So here are the options I know of:
Just do the maneuver faster.

Make the turn into the T dock before the "P" fairway and even touch the dock with the bow and let the wind blow the stern down.

Bring the bow to the aft dock post at any angle and lasso it let the stern swing down then get off the boat at the bow and manually pull the boat in place.

Attempt to tie off starboard side too and from the dock swing the boat.

What method to you figure would have the best chance of success either from the above choices or something different.
 

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Swab
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In my boat, which will pivot 180 degrees in its own length, or nearly, I would just proceed down the left side of the fairway just a bit faster than necessary to maintain steerage, turn to starboard at the end, letting the wind slow me down as I approached the slip at a very slow walking speed. If I need to scrub off more speed I can throttle up in reverse for a few seconds. Since the prop walks the boat to port in reverse, this will actually help pull the stern in. Engine idling, transmission in neutral, step ashore as the boat comes to a complete stop with a line to a midship cleat lead to an anchor point on the dock forward. Secure fore and aft and take a bow if you can pull this off without crew. :cool:

We always have fenders and dock lines arranged port and starboard when entering a harbor, even with an assigned slip. You never know when you might need to switch sides at the last minute.
 

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How controllable is your boat in reverse? Could enter the marina in reverse and go backwards the whole way?
 

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BA, that was my thought, too - when the wind is at the stern, "just" back in. It would give you the ability to easily slow the boat down if a gust comes up, and you'd have the control when you REALLY need it, at the end and as you dock.
 

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how big is your boat?
 

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driving in reverse for prolonged times is a bad idea...can go wrong in a number of ways...and most boats arent that good in reverse(most) try it though if you feel like it.

anyways enter slowly and hug your berth, almost touching it...then turn to port with a big oomph of power, go neutral while still turning, then hard over to stbd and gas it in reverse then you should be with your port side to the berth by then...then let the wind push you into it if you have passed it slightly or if done perfectly you should be right at your berth with the bow into it...then simply scooch along it

really hard to explain but I had an exact same berth setup once...it was a side tie that was downwind at berkeley marina in california...but I loved it

when the wind was piping which it usually does...I simply lowered all sails and let the wind push me into my berth...then I would either leave it like that till the wind died and or flipped it in its berth using my berth lines...
 

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One of None
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driving in reverse for prolonged times is a bad idea...can go wrong in a number of ways...and most boats arent that good in reverse(most) try it though if you feel like it.
I've been tempted to go a couple of miles in reverse just because once the rudder "bites" my boat steers pretty good! If, I don't go too fast. :D
 

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I say back in, unless you have a full keel or something else that makes the boat totally unmaneuverable in reverse. The ability to pull straight in without having to stop or turn around prevents the wind (or in my case, currents) from overcoming you. Plus, if you get in trouble and need to stop suddenly, you're gunning the motor in forward, which generally works better for most props.

This video shows my docking in a strong tidal cross-current that's pushing me into my slip. I need to back in because the finger pier is too low to board onto the bow, and too short to reach the cockpit if I pull in forward. If I took the time to stop and reverse the boat, the current would push me into my neighbors' boats sideways:

This next video shows me backing in with the current pushing me out of the slip. It's much easier - like landing a plane into the wind - but still much better to back in the whole way:

 

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I've been tempted to go a couple of miles in reverse just because once the rudder "bites" my boat steers pretty good! If, I don't go too fast. :D
good for you! dont be tempted...if for some reason you let go of the wheel most boats snap to one side or the other especially if going fast...

if I can I will always let the wind, or current or whatever help me...

but then again I loved to sail into my slips...starting in dinghies helps
 

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...then hard over to stbd and gas it in reverse then you should be with your port side to the berth by then...
In my experience with inboards, gassing it hard in reverse will cause prop walk that pushes the stern to port, which is the opposite way that he wants to turn.
...then let the wind push you into it...
I think he said that he wind is pushing parallel to the fairway, not into the dock.
 

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I don't think you are going to have a lot of options in this. Most important; which way does the boat back? Which is the prevailing wind; is it often gusty and flukey? Is there any current to contend with? Are you spade rudder? Long or short keel?
Do you have enough power in reverse to stop the boat with the normal wind from the stern, with one short, quick burst?
Need this info to give an intelligent suggestion.
 

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We've found that many sailboats actually back pretty good into the wind. You are pulling the back of the boat towards the wind, and the rest of the boat kinda acts like a flag and hangs straight back, so you maintain control.

Bow into the wind, if you loose the bow at low speed, it's hard to get it back. So, for example to hover into the wind, you need to keep correcting the stern to keep it lined up with the bow.

So maybe when the wind is blowing straight down the slipway, you consider backing in the entire way. Other wind orientations use different tactics.

I'd try backing the boat into the wind in some open area first to see if it works for this boat.
 

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I too would be tempted to back down the entire way. Depends on how reliable she backs down.

Another thought for coming in bow first. If you could ride the fairway on the left side and make one turn to get at least 90 deg to the dock and attach the bow line, the wind would continue to push the boat fully around. Even putting her in reverse would do so, particularly if you attached a mid-ship forward spring line, instead of a bow line.
 
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If you go in forward, make sure you know which way the prop walk pushes your stern when in reverse. If it's to port, like most boats, then you were doing your K turn in the wrong direction. I like Minne's suggestion, because it effectively makes the K turn in the opposite direction, which takes advantage of prop walk to port.

You should be able to turn your boat on its length, but only in the direction where prop walk helps you.
 

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I thought the wind was pushing him down the fairway...not into the actual dock I couldnt make that out

sorry

so basically here is the deal, I should refrain from commenting until more info is given...

boat size, displacement, how does it back in reverse, etc...

I had an old boat that had an offset prop...I still could make it go the direction I wanted it to by judicious use of throttle at the perfect time...its just a matter of getting used to your boat...

honestly this thread is like giving driving lessons online...sounds good butyou need to be on the boat in question to really offer any real help...

peace
 

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Don't quite understand why you HAVE to be port side to. Starboard side to would allow you to slide right in. You wouldn't have to worry about turning the boat around until you went out again. If you needed them then, spring lines would be easy to rig and you'd have all the time you wanted to set things up.
 

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I thought the wind was pushing him down the fairway...not into the actual dock I couldnt make that out.....
That's the way I understand it too.

Think about it this way. Get the bow connected and regardless of where the boat is pointed when you tie up, she will clock into the wind, just like at anchor. A little reverse will help, just like at anchor.
 
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That's the way I understand it too.

Think about it this way. Get the bow connected and regardless of where the boat is pointed when you tie up, she will clock into the wind, just like at anchor. A little reverse will help, just like at anchor.
oh OK...then I dont know what the confusion really is...bow always first tie up then spin, or tie another line or whatever you want to do...

is the wind blowing from the right side of the diagram or the left side? or somewhere else?

when the wind was really piping in my old slip I usually had a fender at the quarter on stbd side...then I would first tie a stbd stern line after jumping off the boat....then I would tie others...

I guess Im confused now as to what the real issue is...

sorry but if the wind indeed is pushing you in I have no idea why anybody would want to be pushed in reverse by the wind into a slip...

as to the starboard side being adamant or needed many boats just have a preffered side...but for me if safety is involved id much rather use whatever side has best and easiest access to the water and or quick sailing...

man I need to stop posting! jajaja:D
 

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is the wind blowing from the right side of the diagram or the left side? or somewhere else?
.....
The way I understand the OP question, the wind is blowing from the left side of the diagram and the OP is trying to tie up to the end cap of O-dock.
 
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driving in reverse for prolonged times is a bad idea...can go wrong in a number of ways...and most boats arent that good in reverse(most) try it though if you feel like it.
Not my experience. The biggest issue is getting enough speed through the water to get good flow over the rudder so you can steer.

good for you! dont be tempted...if for some reason you let go of the wheel most boats snap to one side or the other especially if going fast...
That is a valid concern. Hang on. *grin* Unless you have fully balanced rudder you have to remain in control. If you don't let the wheel get away from you every boat I have delivered handled fine in reverse once you got good way on.
 
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