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This is what happened to a house during the Philippines typhoon....


Could you imagine what that wave would've done to a boat?
 

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This is what happened to a house during the Philippines typhoon....
New video shows typhoon wave washing away house - YouTube
Could you imagine what that wave would've done to a boat?
"You DO NOT want to be living on a sailboat during a Hurricane"
Why in the world not?
At least a couple of full days of hard work preparing the boat and securing her before the storm. Then, the equivalent feeling to standing one foot from a freight train moving at 60 mph for the duration. Next we get the days of cleaning up and putting the boat back together afterwards, in the hot and humid conditions that follow a tropical storm. All that, assuming you did your job properly, and everybody else did too, so their boat didn't destroy yours.
What's not to love about being on a boat in a tropical storm?
Ain't yachting fun?
 
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I have not been in conditions like shown on the video. I have ridden out several TS and hurricanes on my boat. Some folks question the wisdom of that. Where, how and around whom I anchor is a major factor. A boat is made to float, houses are not, so storm surge is not an issue if you plan and use proper scope. It is also designed to point into the wind and properly stripped offers much less resistance than a fixed house. The other thing is that my boat has everything I need. Food, water, power, shelter etc and those are not washed away. As we recover from a storm I am not a burden on the limited resources ashore. Dan S/V Marian Claire
 

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Wind and pie move my boat.
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I have ridden out 3 major hurricanes in my boat & done just fine. Folks on shore not so well.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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plus being in the water, the stormsurge affects you much less.
 

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This extract from a BBC website:

Haiyan - equivalent to a category five hurricane - is now heading towards Vietnam and southern China.

The storm made landfall on the Philippines shortly before dawn, bringing gusts that reached 379 km/h (235 mph), waves as high as 15m (45ft) and up to 400mm (15.75 inches) of rain in places.

Nobody rides out a storm like that at sea or in an anchorage for that matter. That is a nudge over 200 knots.

One has to understand that a CAT 5 hurricane is any wind speed over 135 knots
 

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I can imagine myself getting really seasick riding out weather like that on a boat.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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we keep having monster storms like this.. we are going to need a cat 6
 

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Quirky
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Knowing what 100+ on my motorcycle feels like, no way in hell am I playing with 200mph winds.
 

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200mph generates four times the force of 100mph. Only place to be is underground far from the storm surge line.
 

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This extract from a BBC website:

Haiyan - equivalent to a category five hurricane - is now heading towards Vietnam and southern China.

The storm made landfall on the Philippines shortly before dawn, bringing gusts that reached 379 km/h (235 mph), waves as high as 15m (45ft) and up to 400mm (15.75 inches) of rain in places.

Nobody rides out a storm like that at sea or in an anchorage for that matter. That is a nudge over 200 knots.

One has to understand that a CAT 5 hurricane is any wind speed over 135 knots
From what I gather from reading the posts on this forum, most on here won't even sail in the "nudge" between the 200 knots you mentioned and the 235 of the article. I read they may update the Beaufort Scale as they did the Fujita, to accommodate these larger storms.
 

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we keep having monster storms like this.. we are going to need a cat 6
We have been having storms like this for hundreds of years. Early Spanish records show a hurricane with the same intensity as Katrina, striking the Mississippi gulf Coast in 1792. The reports of the damage it caused, and how far inland the storm surge went, are remarkably similiar to what Katrina did. It took 40 years for the area to come back after that hurricane. A Spanish investigator who arrived in 1793 found all of the Spanish ships aground inland, and nobody around.

Hurricane Camille hit Mississippi in 1969 amd broke the equipment at Keesler Air Force Base (home of the Hurricane Hunters) in Biloxi, MS when her winds reached somewhere around 205 to 210 mph. So we'll really never know just how high her winds were.

How many people here remember that one?

We just know about them now.
 

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From what I gather from reading the posts on this forum, most on here won't even sail in the "nudge" between the 200 knots you mentioned and the 235 of the article. I read they may update the Beaufort Scale as they did the Fujita, to accommodate these larger storms.
Sorry, just to avoid confusion, the 235 in the article is MPH which is about 200kn.

One only has to look at the damage cause by this blow. The buildings are same as or worse than those caught in a Cat 5 twister and this is a tropical weather system not a tornado. This winds comes and stays a while, possibly days.

It must be unbelievably spooky.

Beaufort scale goes to 12 which is 64 knots and upwards. That doesn't even begin to describe Haiyan. Hell, I've sailed my boat in open sea through 80 knots, wouldn't choose to do it again but it is easily survivable.
 
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