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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I see a lot of people here talking about oversized anchors here. Can somebody explain this too me? It seems they are saying they don't trust the manufacturer of the anchor enough to trust their sizing guides. Why not just purchase an anchor that works flawlessly like a Rocna or other new gen??? So your 35lb CQR worked for ten years of cursing but now that you have a new gen... you are going to 45, seems like a lot of rampant paranoia.
 

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Administrator
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Remember that movie Fear is the Key?

Just think what would happen if an anchor company purposefully underestimated the size anchor boats need and some boat dragged ashore... The lawyers would have afield day.
So the companies probably also factor in a safety margin.

I but at the top end of the scale. And if on the boarder I would go up a size instead of down a size.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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I have a 23 foot boat.. but I fall above the 2500 pounds they recommend for that size boat So I would go for the next size up. I do not see myself needing more than a 15 pound anchor
 

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Anchors are typically sized for "normal" conditions. I have a Manson Supreme 45lb and a Mantus 60lb on the bow. An over sized anchor like the one I have is used for abnormal or storm conditions.

Coastal cruising is pretty good with one anchor but anyone who is off cruising should consider at least two. We have three.
 

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██▓▓▒▒░&
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"Why not just purchase an anchor that works flawlessly like"

Because none of them are flawless. In some conditions, every anchor will fail and by using one that is "too large" there's less chance of that happening. The rode will break instead, or the anchor chocks, or something else.

What's good enough for lunch or a dinner trip ashore, is plenty good enough. Unless you want "one size fits all" that can also withstand a hurricane, which is when "oversize" begins to count.

Rule of thumb: If you can lift the anchor, it's too small. (G)
 

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Chastened
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BF-

The short answer, is that the sizing guides are not that accurate. They are a vague, general guideline.

For example, a sizing guide that recommends a 22lb. modern anchor, for a 30 foot boat, displacing up to 8,000lbs, doesn't consider or include people, provisions, and equipment that could easily take the boat over the guide's recommendation.

Then factor in that the sizing guides *might* be written for up to 20kt breezes.
Forget hurricanes, what about that summer squall that rolls through with 35 kts of breeze?

Howeverrrrr...there is truth in what you say. Some people up-size their anchor and rode well beyond the range of common sense, relying on the "iron mountain" strategy.
 

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I prefer to use a heavier than normal anchor, and I prefer to use heavier than normal all chain rode, for the following reason:

Bottom characteristics especially around islands that are subject to constant 'surge' can quickly change, or scour out all the 'soft stuff', sand, etc. and what was good holding, a year later can now be 'poor holding'. When in light to moderate sea and wind conditions, and the next anchorage is many many miles away, the extra heavy weight of the anchor and perhaps a few hundred pounds of chain dumped on top of the anchor sometimes makes the difference between a good night's sleep or staying up all damn night doing an anchor watch. I do this a lot on the Bahama and other 'banks', and dont care if I do drag, sometimes several miles; as in such conditions/bottoms the MORE weight/mass you have down the less the amount of drag .... and the longer you can get 'a few winks'.

;-)
 

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"Why not just purchase an anchor that works flawlessly like"
Because sometimes you do sometimes choose to anchor in less than ideal bottom conditions which prevent 'flawless' performance of any anchor. Anchoring in areas of scoured-out marl or 'cochina' bottoms with only 2-3 inches of rounded (fish chewed) coral reef sand on top can sometimes be a bear
 

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snake charmer, cat herder
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i have a 30 kg bruce, original, and a 45 pound cqr, original. i use all chain, 5/16......
i have dragged the 45 pound anchor. i have not dragge dmy bruce.
i will use the oversized bruce, as conditions in mexican west coast are perfect for bruce anchors...rocky bottom with sand or silt over. 45 kt winds in anchorages..NOOO PROBLEM even with chop and swell.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
i have a 30 kg bruce, original, and a 45 pound cqr, original. i use all chain, 5/16......
i have dragged the 45 pound anchor. i have not dragge dmy bruce.
i will use the oversized bruce, as conditions in mexican west coast are perfect for bruce anchors...rocky bottom with sand or silt over. 45 kt winds in anchorages..NOOO PROBLEM even with chop and swell.
I think your chain is too small :)
 

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Old soul
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Yes, after 10 years of "cursing" at my 35 CQR, I am happy to have a modern anchor (Rocna) as well :D

...So your 35lb CQR worked for ten years of cursing but now that you have a new gen... you are going to 45, seems like a lot of rampant paranoia.
My approach, and my recommendation when anyone asks, is to get the largest new-style bower anchor your boat and gear can reasonably manage. This privisio is important b/c I don't want an anchor that is so large that it deters me from using it as I should (resetting, shorts stops, etc.). I also don't want an anchor so large that I can't effectively set it with my boat's engine or backwinded sails (the two techniques I use). I don't think of my bower as a storm anchor, but I do expect it to hold in a wide variety of bottom and sea/wind conditions.

As for trusting the anchor-seller's recommendations, well... given the huge number of variables when it comes to anchoring, I don't think any one (LOA) or two (displacement) dimensional chart can come close to covering the range of possibilities we face out in the real world. It's definitely useful information, but I wouldn't take their recommendations as gospel.

BTW, with my new (old) boat my bower is a 25 kg Rocna (55#) on 3/8" chain (all chain). After three years of seasonal, but pretty intense use, I can count on one hand the number of times I've failed to get a set on the first try. It has held through a few 50 knot storms, one of which spun us 360-degrees in a very short time. This anchor is roughly what Rocna recommends for my boat, although it leans somewhat to the heavier size (our boat falls in-between some of the gradations).
 

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baDumbumbum
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I think your chain is too small :)
Ha. Maybe, maybe not. The size of your rode is largely about the relationship between boat and anchor: loaded displacement, windage, anticipated winds and waves. The weight & design of the anchor is primarily about the relationship between anchor and seafloor. I would much rather save 20# on the upper part of the rode by choosing a smaller, G4 chain -- or 40' of chain plus nylon -- and put that 20# in the anchor itself. Better net holding power. So one approach is to choose how much weight you want on your bow, select a rode that will be strong and chafe-resistant enuf, and then fill the remainder of your weight budget with anchor.

We will carry a couple other anchors aboard, but our Rocna/Manson/Mantus primary will be upsized to 33-35#, which puts it between bower and storm weight for our boat. Combined with 40' of G4 chain and a high-strength, compact 8-plait nylon rode, we feel that system will supply the best blend of anchor hold in multiple bottoms, catenary & chafe protection, pull strength, and shock absorption, all within reasonable weight and bulk. It's probably a bit overkill for normal conditions, but if you can think of a better place for overkill, please share it with us.:p
 

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Broad Reachin'
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There is so much variability in anchoring (boat size, wind, bottom type, rode, chain, anchoring technique, etc.) that I think most people figure upsizing is erring on the side of caution.

I'd also say if folks have a 35lbs CQR that's been working for them, then they'll probably buy a similarly sized anchor when they upgrade to "new-gen".
 

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I will trust their anchor sizing when they provide a warranty that covers my boat during a storm.

The reality is that all the sizing charts assume between 35 and 45kn of wind. Which is great for every day, but what happens when you have a hurricane hit?
 

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Old soul
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The reality is that all the sizing charts assume between 35 and 45kn of wind. Which is great for every day, but what happens when you have a hurricane hit?
Storm anchoring is a different beast than your every-day anchoring. A storm anchor, especially one to deal with a hurricane, will be many sizes bigger than your bower. But I do think the new style anchors are generally better than older designs, therefore they cover a wider range of conditions.

Although I still carry a Bruce and a Danforth I haven't used the latter one since getting my new style anchor. The Bruce I still use as a stern and kedge anchor.
 
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