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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Many years ago while voyaging on my wooden ketch between the shores of New England and South America I learned to highly respect those that sailed the long miles w' nary a wooden nickel in their pockets. From a few of those salty sailors I learned much about dumpster diving, salvaging and repurposing. The affectionate term that I eventually made up for these hearty souls was 'bottom feeders'. With all respect I coined the term and I use it often to refer to those brave and creative sailors that are out there handily 'doing-it' while others remain permanently anchored - awaiting the checks that never add up to procure the hardware required for such bold adventuring.

I now find myself constantly thinking of affordable items I can repurpose from shore that will withstand the abuse of my own future world circumnavigation. I have not the finances to purchase much new through marine chandleries but I am fully committed to launching my salvaged steel ketch and zipping the globe.

The concept of this thread is this: PLEASE POST PHOTOS AND VERY BRIEF DESCRIPTIONS OF ITEMS YOU HAVE CREATED TO FURTHER YOUR OFFSHORE CRUISING MILES. THE CRITICAL COMPONENT HERE IS THAT IT MUST BE MUCH LESS COSTLY THAN THAT OFFERED IN ANY CHANDLERY YET INORDINATELY RELIABLE. There are no limits here... generating power, lighting, self steering, heating water, anything that will gain more miles or comfort for the short handed sailor.

Please reserve any comments as to sailors not paying ones way or leaving a good impression for others that follow - the gentlemen that I refer to left little behind but smiles and the admiration from all that were left in their wake. True yachtsmen there were - may we all voyage with such style and grace!

jw


"Some years ago, never mind how long precisely, having little or no money in my purse...." Herman Melville
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
As a primer for this thread....

one of the amazing concepts that one of my mentors used was fish tank gravel in place of sand for non-skid surfacing. He simply taped off the deck areas where he wanted superior grip and poured epoxy. Then he packed the epoxy with fish tank gravel and after it set up it was painted with deck paint. I am here to witness that you could stand on that deck at any angle your ankles could contort too. In fact, he had to grind a bit down for fear of the skin removed post falling! When you want a true non skid go no further than your fish tank - but beware!!!

jw
 

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Charlie:

If you are looking for ideas on how to make stuff yourself from what's available, I highly recommend a thread that's been on this site for awhile:

http://www.sailnet.com/forums/boat-review-purchase-forum/94255-pros-cons-steel-sailboats.html

Brent Swain has been building and sailing steel sailboats for quite some time, and he takes great pride in fashioning equipment from other people's discards. Fair warning: you will have to wade through a mountain of crap to find what you are looking for in this thread. Brent takes some very strong positions here concerning the marine industry and those that sit at their docks instead of cruising. Some of the comments (on both sides) become quite personal. I sense from your posts that you value decorum and dignity. Well, maybe you can skip over the personal attacks. Brent does present some very interesting ideas for homemade cleats, blocks, windlasses and a host of other things. It's his attitude that anyone who doesn't want to cruise full time in a steel sailboat is not only stupid but lazy and morally bankrupt that I think rubs some people the wrong way. Of course, if you like to see a good, old fashioned mud-slinging hootenanny, pull up a chair, set yourself down and enjoy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I respect Brent for his work in the maritime industry and he certainly has put many people on the water. But perhaps I am more interested in what I can tear apart, change around, and install with new purpose. What can we commonly find at the local recycle center that has use on our boats? I am talking simple stuff for offshore ie. lighting, energy, cozy stuff, cooling/heating etc.

Thank you for directing me to the other site.... but perhaps this thread has merit of its own? I don't mind spending over $100.00 as limited by the other site if it has its use!
 

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Bristol 45.5 - AiniA
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We installed strips of LED lighting, from a regular store in our engine room to replace the two lights that were there. Makes an incredible difference when you need to work on the engine or genet, uses a fraction of the juice and was less than the price of one marine fixture. I know it is not recycled. I don't think too much LED stuff has made it to the recycler yet.
 

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Wingnut
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Really, there isn't much you cant just make yourself out of scrap.
If youve got a steel boat, you are way ahead of the game. If you got welding skills, then you are laughing.

Im just finishing building my keels. The leading edges are 3 " solid round stock. Old hydraulic arms from an old hoe. Paid 40 bucks each at the scrappers...

Sent from my HUAWEI Y300-0151 using Tapatalk
 

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I've been a proud repurposer since I started my little tall ship project ,a Spray named Thane. I was sailing in 5 years for less than 12 grand.of collected beer bottles. Spent somewhat more than that over the years but mostly for gewgaws like radar ,new engine, autopilot. As a working girl Thane earned over a 100 G/yr since about 1990. Enjoyed most every aspect of the journey and still find myself peeking in scrap yards and demo sites . Bonus is ther's not much I can't make or express an opinion on.
 

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Bombay Explorer 44
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I was in Bequia two or three years ago and spotted this bit of recycling.


The local kids had dug up some holed beach cat hulls nailed some scrap timber between the hulls, repurposed a windsurfer mast and sail, cobbled up some seats from beer crates, even added a water tank [starboard rearand and a compass [box in front of water tank]..

Well I thought it had been local kids, it turns out it was a young couple who had dragged the hulls out of the trash in St Marten and built them selves a boat with the idea of sailing from St Marten to Venezuela.

They made it.
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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while I cannot call it dumpster diving.. I proudly swim at the bottom when it comes to repurposing. In refitting my SeaSprite 23, I regularly troll ebay and the like for cast off parts. One of my favourites was a steaming light/deck light mount from a Cape Dory. I got it for all of 20 bucks and it neatly fits the newly polished bronze steaming light and LED deck light I got.. I just need to reshape the mounting some to fit my more slender mast
 

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Hi Mr. charlie , I like your style . Make it yourself . I also like your boat . Are you thinking about a self steering wind vane ? A friend of mine made one, one of the parts he used was a small bicycle wheel . At the time he had very little money, he was going to collage and he made the vane for a engineering thesis . I never saw it , and the boat is long gone , but he said it worked . In one of Bernard Moitessier's books he shows how to make one . Good luck with your plans !
 

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Barquito
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I try to keep costs under control by buying used, and making stuff myself. However, I have had mixed results. I have bought some things that turned out to be crap.

It would be useful if this thread concentrated on more expensive items, whereas the 'Low Buck' thread concentrates on less expensive items.

Anyone want to try marinizing an old VW engine?
 

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Anyone want to try marinizing an old VW engine?
It's not exactly boat-related, but Farm Show magazine has all sorts of articles about re-powering tractors, making your own tractors, fabricating odd devices from scrap.

I've never lived on a farm and I can't weld, but I still get a kick out of seeing the projects these people do.

There might be some ideas in there that would apply to re-powering boats.

FARM SHOW - Books
 

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* Rigging shops throw out lots of high-tech halyards from big boats with one bad spot. Generally the perfect size and length for sheets on smaller boats, and often much better than what you would buy (I'm using Warpspeed where I would have bough StaSet--no stretch and VERY strong).

* Nearly new dock lines with one chafed spot. Cut and tie a knot; uncool doesn't matter if we're bottom feeding.

* I watched a guy paint the bottom entirely with dregs from MT cans. Said it was not the first time. He matched up enough black so that the final coat looked OK. The boat looked a little worn, overall.

*Lash 2" PVC pipe to the stern rail for rod holders. Often free, looks good if done cleanly, and stronger than most commercial holders. Also handy for boat hooks and paddles. The same trick works in the tender; put a paddle in the holder and you have a cleat for towing (this is how we tow kayaks--more versatile than cleats).
 

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Sea Sprite 23 #110 (20)
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Anyone want to try marinizing an old VW engine?
Not much to Marinize, just a matter of getting cool air to the fan and a way to duct the hot air out of the boat. I have seen aircooled Diesels, I have wondered how they would fare in a boat
 

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Not much to Marinize, just a matter of getting cool air to the fan and a way to duct the hot air out of the boat. I have seen aircooled Diesels, I have wondered how they would fare in a boat
Generally poorly. The problem is that engines in cars/trucks/tractors get tons of fresh air. The entire body is exposed and can cool into the environment. Once that same engine is buried into a generally insulated engine room they get very hard to cool. It's possible, but the amount of air needed is substantial.

As for low budget stuff.... LEARN TO SPLICE. It is amazing to me that people will buy the cheapest line they can then pay someone $50 to splice the ends. Learn to do it yourself and lines get much cheaper.
 

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I try to keep costs under control by buying used, and making stuff myself. However, I have had mixed results. I have bought some things that turned out to be crap.

It would be useful if this thread concentrated on more expensive items, whereas the 'Low Buck' thread concentrates on less expensive items.

Anyone want to try marinizing an old VW engine?
Not much to Marinize, just a matter of getting cool air to the fan and a way to duct the hot air out of the boat. I have seen aircooled Diesels, I have wondered how they would fare in a boat
Generally poorly. The problem is that engines in cars/trucks/tractors get tons of fresh air. The entire body is exposed and can cool into the environment. Once that same engine is buried into a generally insulated engine room they get very hard to cool. It's possible, but the amount of air needed is substantial.

As for low budget stuff.... LEARN TO SPLICE. It is amazing to me that people will buy the cheapest line they can then pay someone $50 to splice the ends. Learn to do it yourself and lines get much cheaper.
Diesel Outboards | Klaxon Diesel Outboards here look at the 25 HP unit air and oil cooled
I have a Pathfinder marinized vw diesel that came out of my boat. Turns over but the PO had the injector lines off. So if you had a manual you could probably get it running. It's a 5 cyl inline, 70ish hp.

For sale in NOLA for $500 or a half a boat buck... Or 4 Spanish pieces of eight. Whatever works.

:)
 
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